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SEA BUCKTHORN

Other Names:

Ananas de Sibérie, Argasse, Argousier, Argousier Faux-Nerprun, Bourdaine Marine, Buckthorn, Chharma, Dhar-Bu, Épine Luisante, Épine Marrante, Espino Armarillo, Espino Falso, Faux Nerprun, Finbar, Grisset, Hippophae rhamnoides, Meerdorn, Oblepikh...
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SEA BUCKTHORN Overview
SEA BUCKTHORN Uses
SEA BUCKTHORN Side Effects
SEA BUCKTHORN Interactions
SEA BUCKTHORN Dosing
SEA BUCKTHORN Overview Information

Sea buckthorn is an herb. The leaves, flowers, and fruits are used to make medicine.

Sea buckthorn leaves and flowers are used for treating arthritis, gastrointestinal ulcers, gout, and skinrashes caused by infectious diseases such as measles. A tea containing sea buckthorn leaves is used as a source of vitamins, antioxidants, protein building blocks (amino acids), fatty acids and minerals; for improving blood pressure and lowering cholesterol; preventing and controlling blood vessel diseases; and boosting immunity.

Sea buckthorn berries are used for preventing infections, improving sight, and slowing the aging process.

The seed or berry oil is used as an expectorant for loosening phlegm; for treating asthma, heart disorders including chest pain (angina) and high cholesterol; for preventing blood vessel disease; and as an antioxidant. Sea buckthorn oil is also used for slowing the decline of thinking skills with age; reducing illness due to cancer, as well as limiting the toxicity of chemical cancer treatment (chemotherapy); balancing the immune system; treating stomach and intestinal diseases including ulcers and reflux esophagitis (GERD); treating night blindness and dry eye; and as a supplemental source of vitamins C, A, and E, beta-carotene, minerals, amino acids, and fatty acids.

Some people apply sea buckthorn berries, berry concentrate, and berry or seed oil directly to the skin for preventing sunburn; for treating radiation damage from x-rays and sunburns; for healing wounds including bedsores, burns, and cuts; for acne, dermatitis, dry skin, eczema, skin ulcers, and skin color changes after giving birth; and for protecting mucus membranes.

In foods, sea buckthorn berries are used to make jellies, juices, purees, and sauces.

In manufacturing, sea buckthorn is used in cosmetics and anti-aging products.

How does it work?

Sea buckthorn contains vitamins A, B1, B2, B6, C, and other active ingredients. It might have some activity against stomach and intestinal ulcers, and heartburn symptoms.

SEA BUCKTHORN Uses & Effectiveness What is this?

Possibly Ineffective for:

  • A skin condition called atopic dermatitis (eczema). Early research shows that taking sea buckthorn pulp oil by mouth for 4 months improves atopic dermatitis. However, sea buckthorn seed oil taken by mouth does not have this effect. Also, applying cream containing 10% or 20% sea buckthorn on the skin for 4 weeks does not seem to improve symptoms of mild-to-moderate atopic dermatitis.

Insufficient Evidence for:

  • Burns. Some early research suggests that dressing burn wounds with sea buckthorn oil significantly reduces pain and improves healing. However, other research suggests that dressing burn wounds with sea buckthorn oil may be less tolerable and less effective than other active preparations.
  • Heart disease. Developing research in China suggests that taking a particular sea buckthorn extract three times by mouth for 6 weeks lowers cholesterol, reduces chest pain, and improves heart function in people with heart disease.
  • Common cold. Early research shows that consuming sea buckthorn berries in a frozen puree for 90 days does not prevent the common cold or make symptoms go away faster.
  • Digestive tract infection. Early research shows that consuming sea buckthorn berries in frozen puree for 90 days does not prevent digestive tract infections.
  • Dry eye. Some early research shows that taking a specific sea buckthorn product (Omega-7, Aromtech Ltd., Finland) by mouth decreases feelings of eye redness and burning.
  • High blood pressure. Early research suggests that taking sea buckthorn by mouth for up to 8 months might reduce high blood pressure similarly to certain blood pressure-lowering drugs.
  • Liver disease (cirrhosis). There is some early evidence showing that taking sea buckthorn extract might reduce liver enzymes and other chemicals in the blood that indicate liver problems.
  • Stomach ulcers. Early research suggests that taking sea buckthorn oil while receiving standard treatment using an endoscope might reduce how long people with stomach ulcers have to stay in the hospital.
  • Weight loss. Early evidence shows that taking sea buckthorn berries, berry oil, or extract by mouth does not reduce body weight in overweight or obese women.
  • Arthritis.
  • Gout.
  • High cholesterol.
  • Vision disorders.
  • Aging.
  • Cough.
  • Asthma.
  • Chest pain (angina).
  • Cancer.
  • Heartburn.
  • Sunburn.
  • Wounds.
  • Pressure ulcers.
  • Cuts.
  • Acne.
  • Dry skin.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate sea buckthorn for these uses.


SEA BUCKTHORN Side Effects & Safety

Sea buckthorn fruit is LIKELY SAFE when consumed as food. Sea buckthorn fruit is used in jams, pies, drinks, and other foods. Sea buckthorn fruit is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth or used on the skin as a medicine. It has been safely used in scientific studies lasting up to 90 days.

However, not enough is known about the safety of using sea buckthorn leaf or extracts.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking sea buckthorn if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Bleeding disorder: Sea buckthorn might slow blood clotting when taken as a medicine. There is some concern that it might increase the risk of bruising and bleeding in people with bleeding disorders.

Low blood pressure: Sea buckthorn might lower blood pressure when taken as a medicine. In theory, taking sea buckthorn might make blood pressure become too low in people with low blood pressure.

Surgery: Sea buckthorn might slow blood clotting when taken as a medicine. There is some concern that it might cause extra bleeding during and after surgery. Stop using sea buckthorn at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

SEA BUCKTHORN Interactions What is this?

Moderate Interaction Be cautious with this combination

  • Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs) interacts with SEA BUCKTHORN

    Sea buckthorn might slow blood clotting. Taking sea buckthorn along with medications that also slow clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding.
    Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen (Anaprox, Naprosyn, others), dalteparin (Fragmin), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin, warfarin (Coumadin), and others.


SEA BUCKTHORN Dosing

The appropriate dose of sea buckthorn depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for sea buckthorn. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

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Conditions of Use and Important Information: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version. © Therapeutic Research Faculty 2009.

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