Hysterectomy - What to Think About

Your doctor may suggest other treatments before recommending a hysterectomy. If you are considering a hysterectomy and would like more information about other treatments or surgeries, talk with your doctor. Ask about the risks and benefits of each option. Consider both the immediate and long-term risks and benefits of all treatments.

Hysterectomy is a necessary and effective treatment for cancer of the pelvic organs, a severe infection of the uterus, or uncontrollable bleeding.

Following hysterectomy, you will not be able to become pregnant. If you have plans for a future pregnancy, hysterectomy is not an appropriate treatment option for conditions such as uterine fibroids, endometriosis, or pelvic organ prolapse. Talk with your doctor about other treatments.

Hysterectomy is not used to prevent pregnancy. There are many methods of birth control that are safe and effective. If you are not sure which method is best for you, talk with your doctor about your options.

Estrogen therapy (ET)

Women who have early, sudden menopause after hysterectomy are usually advised to use estrogen therapy (ET) to protect against bone loss. The low estrogen levels of menopause cause bone thinning. Compared with women who are not taking hormone therapy, women taking ET have fewer hip fractures (a sign of estrogen's bone-protecting effect).6

For more information, see:

Hysterectomy and Oophorectomy: Should I Use Estrogen Therapy (ET)?
WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise
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