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  • Question 1/12

    Anxiety and stress are the same thing.

  • Answer 1/12

    Anxiety and stress are the same thing.

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    • Correct Answer:

    Anxiety is an emotion -- you feel nervous or scared. Stress is a physical response to something you feel threatened by -- your heart beats faster, your breath comes quicker, and your muscles tense. It’s your body’s way of making you alert and prepared for action. Anxiety can be triggered by stress.

  • Question 1/12

    Anxiety can be a good thing.

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    Anxiety can be a good thing.

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    It may not be enjoyable, but it’s a normal emotion. And it can help you focus when you face a challenge or threat.

  • Question 1/12

    You may need to talk with your doctor if anxiety makes you:

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    You may need to talk with your doctor if anxiety makes you:

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    A loss of appetite or sleep every once in a while because of anxiety is normal for most people. But people who have extreme fear and worry that won’t go away or interfere with their jobs or relationships may have an anxiety disorder. Some examples are generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and social anxiety disorder.

  • Question 1/12

    What percentage of American adults are affected by an anxiety disorder each year?

  • Answer 1/12

    What percentage of American adults are affected by an anxiety disorder each year?

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    • Correct Answer:

    Anxiety disorders are the most common type of mental illness in the U.S.

  • Question 1/12

    Who’s more likely to be affected by anxiety disorders?

  • Answer 1/12

    Who’s more likely to be affected by anxiety disorders?

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    • Correct Answer:

    Women are twice as likely as men to have one. Your risk is also higher if you're under 35 or you have a chronic disease.

  • Question 1/12

    You may be more likely to have an anxiety disorder if you:

  • Answer 1/12

    You may be more likely to have an anxiety disorder if you:

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    You’re also at greater risk if you have money problems or have dealt with stressful life events.  

  • Question 1/12

    Medication can cure anxiety disorders.

  • Answer 1/12

    Medication can cure anxiety disorders.

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    • Correct Answer:

    Medication can only manage the symptoms. The ones usually used to treat them are antidepressants and anti-anxiety drugs. Other medicines can help control physical symptoms like a fast heartbeat or shaking or trembling. But you also may need therapy for the underlying cause.

  • Question 1/12

    Exercise works as well as medicine for some people with anxiety disorders. 

  • Answer 1/12

    Exercise works as well as medicine for some people with anxiety disorders. 

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    In one study, people who did regular, vigorous exercise were 25% less likely to develop an anxiety disorder. Talk with your doctor about how to ramp up your exercise plan.

  • Question 1/12

    This can be a symptom of generalized anxiety disorder:

  • Answer 1/12

    This can be a symptom of generalized anxiety disorder:

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    If anxiety prevents you from doing everyday things and just won’t go away, you may have this type of disorder. You might also have a hard time concentrating, be irritable, or have muscle tension.

  • Question 1/12

    Fear of this may be linked to a panic disorder:

  • Answer 1/12

    Fear of this may be linked to a panic disorder:

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    This disorder involves repeated panic attacks -- sudden, intense fear that makes your heart pound and causes sweating, trembling, and shortness of breath. You also may worry about when the next attack might happen and avoid places where you’ve had them before. For example, if you have one on an airplane, it can lead to a fear of flying.

  • Question 1/12

    An intense fear of this can be a sign of social anxiety disorder:

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    An intense fear of this can be a sign of social anxiety disorder:

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    You may feel nauseous and blush, sweat, or tremble when you’re around other people. You may be afraid of being embarrassed or judged, and may worry for days or weeks before a social event.

  • Question 1/12

    One way to treat an anxiety disorder is to face your fears.

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    One way to treat an anxiety disorder is to face your fears.

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    Called exposure therapy, it involves doing the things that make you anxious, with the guidance of a therapist. It’s usually used along with relaxation exercises. But studies have shown that it doesn’t work as well as cognitive therapy, which focuses on finding and addressing the reason behind your anxiety.

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    Your Score:

    You correctly answered out of questions.

    Results:

    You’ve conquered your anxiety about this test and come out on top. Well done!

    Results:

    Not bad! A little more work might help reduce your anxiety and improve your score.

    Results:

    No need to get anxious. You simply need to put in a little more study time to improve your score.

Sources | Reviewed by Melinda Ratini, MS, DO on November 04, 2016 Medically Reviewed on November 04, 2016

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini, MS, DO on
November 04, 2016

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

1) Dave & Les Jacobs / Getty Images

 

SOURCES:

Anxiety and Depression Association of America: “Exercise for Stress and Anxiety,” “Facts & Statistics: Did You Know?” “Stress.”

National Institute of Mental Health: “Anxiety Disorders,” “Any Anxiety Disorder Among Adults.”

National Library of Medicine: “Women are more likely to suffer from anxiety than men.”

This tool does not provide medical advice.
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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.