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How does exercise affect blood sugar?

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When you exercise, your body needs extra energy from blood sugar, also called glucose.

When you do something quickly, like a sprint to catch the bus, your muscles and liver release glucose for fuel.

The big payoff comes when you do moderate exercise for a longer time, like a hike. Your muscles take up much more glucose when you do that. This helps lower your blood sugar levels.

If you're doing intense exercise, your blood sugar levels may rise, temporarily, after you stop.

SOURCES: 

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: "Physical Activity and Health: A Report of the Surgeon General."

American Diabetes Association. 

Castaneda, C. Diabetes Care, December 2002.

National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse: "What I need to know about Physical Activity and Diabetes."

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on October 16, 2020

SOURCES: 

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: "Physical Activity and Health: A Report of the Surgeon General."

American Diabetes Association. 

Castaneda, C. Diabetes Care, December 2002.

National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse: "What I need to know about Physical Activity and Diabetes."

Reviewed by Tyler Wheeler on October 16, 2020

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