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Imotil oral

Generic Name(S): loperamide

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  • Uses
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Warnings:
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Uses

See also Warning section.This medication is used to treat sudden diarrhea (including traveler's diarrhea). It works by slowing down the movement of the gut. This decreases the number of bowel movements and makes the stool less watery. Loperamide is also used to reduce the amount of discharge in patients who have undergone an ileostomy. It is also used to treat on-going diarrhea in people with inflammatory bowel disease.Loperamide treats only the symptoms, not the cause of the diarrhea (e.g., infection). Treatment of other symptoms and the cause of the diarrhea should be determined by your doctor.

How to use Imotil oral

See also Warning section.

If you are using the over-the-counter product to self-treat, read all the directions on the product package before taking this medication. If your doctor has prescribed this medication, follow your doctor's directions and the directions on your prescription label.

Take this medication by mouth, usually after each loose stool, or as directed by your doctor. The dosage is based on your condition and response to treatment. In children, dosage is also based on age and weight. Adults should not use more than 8 milligrams in 24 hours if self-treating, or 16 milligrams in 24 hours if under a doctor's direction.

If you are taking the chewable tablet, take this medication on an empty stomach. The chewable tablets should be chewed thoroughly before swallowing.

If you are using the rapidly dissolving tablets, dry your hands before opening the blister pack to carefully remove a tablet. Do not push the tablet through the blister pack. Place the tablet on the tongue, allow it to dissolve completely, then swallow it with saliva. Do not crush, split, or break the tablet before taking it. Do not remove the tablet from the blister pack until just before taking. No water is needed to take this medication.

Diarrhea can cause a serious loss of body water (dehydration). Drink plenty of fluids and minerals (electrolytes) to replace what is lost. Tell your doctor right away if you develop signs of dehydration (e.g., extreme thirst, decreased urination, muscle cramps, weakness, fainting). You may also need to change to a bland diet during this time to reduce irritation to your stomach/intestines. Consult your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Tell your doctor if your diarrhea does not improve after 2 days, if your condition worsens, or if you develop new symptoms. If you develop blood in the stool, fever, or an uncomfortable fullness/swelling of the stomach/abdomen, or if you think you may have a serious medical problem, seek immediate medical attention.

If you are taking this medication under your doctor's direction for ongoing diarrhea, tell your doctor if your diarrhea continues after 10 days of treatment.

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Selected from data included with permission and copyrighted by First Databank, Inc. This copyrighted material has been downloaded from a licensed data provider and is not for distribution, except as may be authorized by the applicable terms of use.

CONDITIONS OF USE: The information in this database is intended to supplement, not substitute for, the expertise and judgment of healthcare professionals. The information is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, drug interactions or adverse effects, nor should it be construed to indicate that use of a particular drug is safe, appropriate or effective for you or anyone else. A healthcare professional should be consulted before taking any drug, changing any diet or commencing or discontinuing any course of treatment.

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