NADH

OTHER NAME(S):

B-DPNH, BNADH, Coenzyme 1, Enada, NAD, Nicotinamide Adénine Dinucléotide, Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Hydrate, Reduced DPN, Reduced Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide.<br/><br/>

Overview

Overview Information

NADH stands for "nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) + hydrogen (H)." This chemical occurs naturally in the body and plays a role in the chemical process that generates energy. People use NADH supplements as medicine.

NADH is used for improving mental clarity, alertness, concentration, and memory; as well as for treating Alzheimer’s disease. Because of its role in energy production, NADH is also used for improving athletic endurance and treating chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS).

Some people use NADH for treating high blood pressure, high cholesterol, jet lag, depression, and Parkinson’s disease; boosting the immune system; opposing alcohol’s effects on the liver and the hormone testosterone; reducing signs of aging; and protecting against the side effects of an AIDS drug called zidovudine (AZT).

Healthcare providers sometimes give NADH by intramuscular (IM) or intravenous (IV) injection for Parkinson's disease and depression.

How does it work?

NADH produced by our bodies is involved in making energy in the body. While there is some evidence that suggests NADH supplements might reduce blood pressure, lower cholesterol, help chronic fatigue syndrome by providing energy, and increase nerve signals for people with Parkinson's disease, there isn't enough information to know for sure how or if these supplements work.

Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Possibly Ineffective for

Insufficient Evidence for

  • Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). There is some early evidence that NADH might reduce the symptoms of CFS when used along with traditional medications.
  • Parkinson's disease. So far, study results don’t agree about the effectiveness of NADH in treating Parkinson’s disease.
  • Depression.
  • Jet lag.
  • High blood pressure.
  • Improving athletic performance.
  • Increasing energy.
  • Improving memory and concentration.
  • Boosting immune function.
  • Reducing signs of aging.
  • Lowering cholesterol levels.
  • Protecting against side effects of the drug zidovudine (AZT) used to treat AIDS.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of NADH for these uses.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

NADH seems safe for most people when used appropriately and short-term, up to 12 weeks. Most people do not experience any side effects when taking the recommended amount each day, which is 10 mg.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of NADH during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Interactions

Interactions?

We currently have no information for NADH Interactions.

Dosing

Dosing

The appropriate dose of NADH depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for NADH. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

View References

REFERENCES:

  • Birkmayer JG, Vrecko C, Volc D, Birkmayer W. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) - a new therapeutic approach to Parkinson's disease. Comparison of oral and parenteral application. Acta Neurol Scand Suppl 1993;146:32-5. View abstract.
  • Budavari S, ed. The Merck Index. 12th ed. Whitehouse Station, NJ: Merck & Co., Inc., 1996.
  • Bushehri N, Jarrell ST, Lieberman S, et al. Oral reduced B-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) affects blood pressure, lipid peroxidation, and lipid profile in hypertensive rats (SHR). Geriatr Nephrol Urol 1998;8:95-100. View abstract.
  • Bushehri N, Jarrell ST, Lieberman S, et al. Oral reduced B-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) affects blood pressure, lipid peroxidation, and lipid profile in hypertensive rats (SHR). Geriatr Nephrol Urol 1998;8:95-100. View abstract.
  • Dizdar N, Kagedal B, Lindvall B. Treatment of Parkinson's disease with NADH. Acta Neurol Scand 1994;90:345-7. View abstract.
  • Forsyth LM, Preuss HG, MacDowell AL, et al. Therapeutic effects of oral NADH on the symptoms of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 1999;82:185-91. View abstract.
  • Hawkins EB. NADH: Advanced supplementation for more energy and slower aging. Natural Pharmacy 1998;2:10.
  • Kuhn W, Muller T, Winkel R, et al. Parenteral application of NADH in Parkinson's disease: clinical improvement partially due to stimulation of endogenous levodopa biosynthesis. J Neural Transmiss (Budapest) 1996;103:1187-93. View abstract.
  • Rainer M, Kraxberger E, Haushofer M, et al. No evidence for cognitive improvement from oral nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) in dementia. J Neural Transm 2000;107:1475-81. View abstract.
  • Swerdlow RH. Is NADH effective in the treatment of Parkinson's disease? Drugs Aging 1998;13:263-8. View abstract.
  • Vrecko K, Birkmayer JG, Krainz J. Stimulation of dopamine biosynthesis in cultured PC 12 phaeochromocytoma cells by the coenzyme nicotinamide adeninedinucleotide (NADH). J Neural Transm Park Dis Dement Sect 1993;5:147-56. View abstract.
  • Vrecko K, Storga D, Birkmayer JG, et al. NADH stimulates endogenous dopamine biosynthesis by enhancing the recycling of tetrahydrobiopterin in rat phaeochromocytoma cells. Biochim Biophys Acta 1997;1361:59-65. View abstract.

More Resources for NADH

CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version. © Therapeutic Research Faculty 2009.