NATTOKINASE

OTHER NAME(S):

BSP, Extrait de Natto, Fermented Soybeans, Haricots de Soja Fermentés, Natto de Soja, Natto Extract, Nattokinasa, NK, Soy Natto, Subtilisin NAT.<br/><br/>

Overview

Overview Information

Nattokinase is an enzyme (a protein that speeds up reactions in the body) that is extracted from a popular Japanese food called natto. Natto is boiled soybeans that have been fermented with a type of bacteria.

Natto has been used as a folk remedy for diseases of the heart and blood vessels for hundreds of years. But you won’t find nattokinase in soy foods other than natto, since nattokinase is produced through the specific fermentation process used to make natto.

Nattokinase is commonly used orally for cardiovascular diseases including heart disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, stroke, chest pain (angina), deep vein thrombosis (DVT), "hardening of the arteries" (atherosclerosis), hemorrhoids, varicose veins, poor circulation, and peripheral artery disease (PAD). But there is limited scientific research to support most of these uses.

How does it work?

Nattokinase "thins the blood" and helps break up blood clots. This might protect against heart disease and conditions caused by blood clots such as stroke, heart attack, and others.

Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Possibly Effective for

  • High blood pressure. Some research suggests that taking nattokinase daily for up to 8 weeks can reduce blood pressure in people with high blood pressure.

Insufficient Evidence for

  • Deep vein thrombosis (DVT). There is some evidence that taking a specific combination product (Flite Tabs) might decrease the chance of getting a blood clot in the legs during long plane flights. This product combines a blend of 150 mg of nattokinase plus pycnogenol. Two capsules are taken 2 hours before the flight and then again 6 hours later.
  • High cholesterol. Some early research suggests that taking a combination of nattokinase and a compound called red yeast for up to 6 months might reduce cholesterol levels in people with high cholesterol. However, taking nattokinase alone does not seem to reduce cholesterol levels.
  • Heart disease.
  • Stroke.
  • Angina.
  • “Hardening of the ateries” (atherosclerosis).
  • Hemorrhoids.
  • Poor circulation.
  • Varicose veins.
  • Peripheral artery disease (PAD).
  • Pain.
  • Fibromyalgia.
  • Chronic fatigue syndrome.
  • Endometriosis.
  • Uterine fibroids.
  • Muscle spasms.
  • Infertility.
  • Cancer.
  • Beriberi.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of nattokinase for these uses.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

Nattokinase is LIKELY SAFE when taken by mouth in amounts commonly found in foods. Nattokinase is a natural component of the soy food natto. It has been routinely consumed in Japanese cultures for hundreds of years.

Nattokinase is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth as medicine. Taking nattokinase for up to 6 months seems to be safe.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking nattokinase if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Bleeding disorders: Nattokinase seems to act like a “blood thinner” and might make bleeding disorders worse. Use with caution.

Low blood pressure: Nattokinase seems to lower blood pressure. If your blood pressure is already too low, this might be a problem. Use with caution.

Surgery: Nattokinase might increase the chance of bleeding too much during or after surgery. It might also make blood pressure difficult to control during surgery. Stop taking it at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Interactions

Interactions?

Moderate Interaction

Be cautious with this combination

!
  • Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs) interacts with NATTOKINASE

    Nattokinase can decrease blood clotting. Taking nattokinase along with medications that also slow clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding.<br/><br/> Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen (Anaprox, Naprosyn, others), dalteparin (Fragmin), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin, warfarin (Coumadin), and others.

Dosing

Dosing

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY MOUTH:

  • For high blood pressure: 2000 formula units of nattokinase have been taken daily for up to 8 weeks.

View References

REFERENCES:

  • Chang, Y. Y., Liu, J. S., Lai, S. L., Wu, H. S., and Lan, M. Y. Cerebellar hemorrhage provoked by combined use of nattokinase and aspirin in a patient with cerebral microbleeds. Intern Med 2008;47(5):467-469. View abstract.
  • Kazuya, O., Shigeo, I., and KenichimS. Report of research: an oral safety study of nattokinase containing food, Natural Super Kinase II: a randomized placebo controlled double-blind study. Progress in Medicine 2006;26(5):5.
  • Kim, J. Y., Gum, S. N., Paik, J. K., Lim, H. H., Kim, K. C., Ogasawara, K., Inoue, K., Park, S., Jang, Y., and Lee, J. H. Effects of nattokinase on blood pressure: a randomized, controlled trial. Hypertens.Res 2008;31(8):1583-1588. View abstract.
  • Krishnan Medical Association SC. Effect of NSK-SD on Blood Pressure by Oral Administration. 7-12-2003;
  • Pais, E., Alexy, T., Holsworth, R. E., Jr., and Meiselman, H. J. Effects of nattokinase, a pro-fibrinolytic enzyme, on red blood cell aggregation and whole blood viscosity. Clin Hemorheol.Microcirc. 2006;35(1-2):139-142. View abstract.
  • Tai, M. W. and Sweet, B. V. Nattokinase for prevention of thrombosis. Am J Health Syst.Pharm 6-15-2006;63(12):1121-1123. View abstract.
  • <p>Maruyama M, Sumi H (eds): Effect of natto diet on blood pressure, in Basic and Clinical Aspects of Japanese Traditional Food Natto II. Japan Technology Transfer Association (JTTAS), 1998, pp 1–3.</p>
  • Cesarone MR, Belcaro G, Nicolaides AN, et al. Prevention of venous thrombosis in long-haul flights with Flite Tabs: The LONFLIT-FLITE randomized, controlled trial. Angiology 2003;54:531-9. View abstract.
  • Fujita M, Hong K, Ito Y, et al. Thrombolytic effect of nattokinase on a chemically induced thrombosis model in a rat. Biol Pharm Bull 1995;18:1387-91. View abstract.
  • Fujita M, Nomura K, Hong K, et al. Purification and characterization of a strong fibrinolytic enzyme (nattokinase) in the vegetable cheese natto, a popular soybean fermented food in Japan. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 1993;197:1340-7. View abstract.
  • Kurosawa Y, Nirengi S, Homma T, et al. A single-dose of oral nattokinase potentiates thrombolysis and anti-coagulation profiles. Sci Rep 2015;5:11601. View abstract.
  • Sumi H, Hamada H, Nakanishi K, Hiratani H. Enchancement of fibrinolytic activity in plasma by oral administration of nattokinase. Acta Haematol 1990;84:139-43. View abstract.
  • Sumi H, Hamada H, Tsushima H, et al. A novel fibrinolytic enzyme (nattokinase) in the vegetable cheese Natto; a typical and popular soybean food in the Japanese diet. Experientia 1987;43:1110-1. View abstract.
  • Suzuki Y, Kondo K, Ichise, H, et al. Dietary supplementation with fermented soybeans suppresses intimal thickening. Nutrition 2003;19:261–4. View abstract.
  • Suzuki Y, Kondo K, Matsumoto Y, et al. Dietary supplementation of fermented soybean, natto, suppresses intimal thickening and modulates the lysis of mural thrombi after endothelial injury in rat femoral artery. Life Sci 2003;73:1289-98.. View abstract.
  • Urano T, Ihara H, Umemura K, et al. The Profibrinolytic Enzyme Subtilisin NAT Purified from Bacillus subtilis Cleaves and Inactivates Plasminogen Activator InhibitorType 1. J Biol Chem 2001;276:24690-6. View abstract.
  • Yang NC, Chou CW, Chen CY, Hwang KL, Yang YC. Combined nattokinase with red yeast rice but not nattokinase alone has potent effects on blood lipids in human subjects with hyperlipidemia. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr 2009;18(3):310-7. View abstract.

More Resources for NATTOKINASE

CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

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© Therapeutic Research Faculty 2018.