LAURIC ACID

OTHER NAME(S):

Acide Laurique, Acide N-dodécanoïque, Ácido Láurico, Coconut Oil Extract, Extrait d’Huile de Noix de Coco, N-dodecanoic Acid, N-alkanoic Acid.<br/><br/>

Overview

Overview Information

Lauric acid is a saturated fat. It is found in many vegetable fats, particularly in coconut and palm kernel oils. People use it as medicine.

Lauric acid is used for treating viral infections including influenza (the flu); swine flu; avian flu; the common cold; fever blisters, cold sores, and genital herpes caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV); genital warts caused by human papillomavirus (HPV); and HIV/AIDS. It is also used for preventing the transmission of HIV from mothers to children.

Other uses for lauric acid include treatment of bronchitis, gonorrhea, yeast infections, chlamydia, intestinal infections caused by a parasite called Giardia lamblia, and ringworm.

In foods, lauric acid is used as a vegetable shortening.

In manufacturing, lauric acid is used to make soap and shampoo.

How does it work?

It is not known how lauric acid might work as a medicine. Some research suggests lauric acid might be a safer fat than trans-fats in food preparations.

Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Insufficient Evidence for

More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of lauric acid for these uses.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

Lauric acid is safe in amounts found in foods. But there isn’t enough information to know whether it is safer when used as a medicine.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Lauric acid is safe for pregnant and breast-feeding women in food amounts. But larger medicinal amounts should be avoided until more is known. There is some concern about using lauric acid during breast-feeding because lauric acid passes into breast milk. Stay on the safe side and stick with food amounts if you are pregnant or breast-feeding.

Interactions

Interactions?

We currently have no information for LAURIC ACID Interactions.

Dosing

Dosing

The appropriate dose of lauric acid depends on several factors such as the user’s age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for lauric acid. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

View References

REFERENCES:

  • Brown KE, Leong K, Huang CH, et al. Gelatin/chondroitin 6-sulfate microspheres for the delivery of therapeutic proteins to the joint. Arthritis Rheum 1998;41:2185-95. View abstract.
  • de Roos N, Schouten E, Katan M. Consumption of a solid fat rich in lauric acid results in a more favorable serum lipid profile in healthy men and women than consumption of a solid fat rich in trans-fatty acids. J Nutr 2001;131;242-5. View abstract.
  • Denke MA, Grundy SM. Comparison of effects of lauric acid and palmitic acid on plasma lipids and lipoproteins. Am J Clin Nutr 1992;56:895-8. View abstract.
  • FDA, Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, Office of Premarket Approval, EAFUS: A food additive database. Website: vm.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/eafus.html (Accessed 23 February 2006).
  • Francois CA, Connor SL, Wander RC, Connor WE. Acute effects of dietary fatty acids on the fatty acids of human milk. Am J Clin Nutr 1998;67:301-8. View abstract.
  • Temme EH, Mensink RP, Hornstra G. Comparison of the effects of diets enriched in lauric, palmitic, or oleic acids on serum lipids and lipoproteins in healthy women and men. Am J Clin Nutr 1996;63:897-903. View abstract.
  • Temme EH, Mensink RP, Hornstra G. Effects of diets enriched in lauric, palmitic, or oleic acids on blood coagulation and fibrinolysis. Thromb Haemost 1999;81:259-63. View abstract.
  • Tholstrup T, Marckmann P, Jespersen J, Sandstrom B. Fat high in stearic acid favorably affects blood lipids and factor VII coagulant activity in comparison with fats high in palmitic acid or high in myristic and lauric acids. Am J Clin Nutr 1994;59:371-7. View abstract.
  • Tholstrup T, Marckmann P, Vessby B, Sandstrom B. Effect of fats high in individual saturated fatty acids on plasma lipoprotein[a] levels in young healthy men. J Lipid Res 1995;36;1447-52. View abstract.

More Resources for LAURIC ACID

CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version.
© Therapeutic Research Faculty 2018.