ASCORBIGEN

OTHER NAME(S):

AGN, Ascrobig&egrave;ne, Indole.<br/><br/>

Overview

Overview Information

Ascorbigen is a chemical found in broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, and related vegetables. It is used to make medicine.

People take ascorbigen for treating fibromyalgia and preventing breast cancer.

How does it work?

There isn't enough information available to know how ascorbigen might work.

Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Insufficient Evidence for

More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of ascorbigen for these uses.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

Ascorbigen seems to be safe for use for up to one month. It can cause intestinal gas, bloating, and unpleasant taste.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of ascorbigen during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Interactions

Interactions?

Moderate Interaction

Be cautious with this combination

!
  • Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2) substrates) interacts with ASCORBIGEN

    Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver.<br><br>Ascorbigen might increase how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. Taking ascorbigen along with some medications that are changed by the liver might decrease the effects of some medications.<br><br>Some of these medications that are changed by the liver include clozapine (Clozaril), cyclobenzaprine (Flexeril), fluvoxamine (Luvox), haloperidol (Haldol), imipramine (Tofranil), mexiletine (Mexitil), olanzapine (Zyprexa), pentazocine (Talwin), propranolol (Inderal), tacrine (Cognex), theophylline, zileuton (Zyflo), zolmitriptan (Zomig), and others.

Dosing

Dosing

The appropriate dose of ascorbigen depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for ascorbigen. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

View References

REFERENCES:

  • Bonnesen C, Eggleston IM, Hayes JD. Dietary indoles and isothiocyanates that are generated from cruciferous vegetables can both stimulate apoptosis and confer protection against DNA damage in human colon cell lines. Cancer Res 2001;61:6120-30. View abstract.
  • Bramwell B, Ferguson S, Scarlett N, Macintosh A. The use of ascorbigen in the treatment of fibromyalgia patients: a preliminary trial. Altern Med Rev 2000;5:455-62. View abstract.
  • Buskov S, Hansen LB, Olsen CE, et al. Determination of ascorbigens in autolysates of various Brassica species using supercritical fluid chromatography. J Agric Food Chem 2000;48:2693-701. View abstract.
  • Kravchenko LV, Avren'eva LI, Guseva GV, et al. Effect of nutritional indoles on activity of xenobiotic metabolism enzymes and T-2 toxicity in rats. Bull Exp Biol Med 2001;131:544-7. View abstract.
  • Sepkovic DW, Bradlow HL, Michnovicz J, et al. Catechol estrogen production in rat microsomes after treatment with indole-3-carbinol, ascorbigen, or beta-naphthaflavone: a comparison of stable isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and radiometric methods. Steroids 1994;59:318-23. View abstract.

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CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version.
© Therapeutic Research Faculty 2018.