KRILL OIL

OTHER NAME(S):

Aceite de Krill, Acide Docosahexaénoïque, Acides Gras Oméga 3, Acides Gras N-3, Acides Gras Polyinsaturés, Acides Gras W3, Antarctic Krill Oil, Concentré de Protéines Marines, DHA, Docosahexanoic Acid, EPA, Euphausia Superba Oil, Euphausiacé, Euphausiids Oil, Huile d' Euphausia Superba, Huile de Krill, Huile de Krill Antarctique, Huile d'Oméga 3, Marine Protein Concentrate, n-3 Fatty Acids, Omega 3, Omega-3 Fatty Acids, Omega-3, Oméga 3, Omega-3 Fatty Acids, Omega-3 Oil, Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids, W-3 Fatty Acids.<br/><br/>

Overview

Overview Information

Krill oil is oil from a tiny, shrimp-like animal. Baleen whales, mantas, and whale sharks eat primarily krill. In Norwegian, the word "krill" means "whale food." People extract the oil from krill, place it in capsules, and use it for medicine. Some brand name krill oil products indicate that they use Antarctic krill. This usually refers to the species of krill called Euphausia superba.

Krill oil is most commonly used for heart disease, high levels of certain blood fats (triglycerides), and high cholesterol, but there is limited scientific research to support these uses.

How does it work?

Krill oil contains fatty acids similar to fish oil. These fats are thought to be beneficial fats that decrease swelling, lower cholesterol, and make blood platelets less sticky. When blood platelets are less sticky they are less likely to form clots.

Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Insufficient Evidence for

  • Aging skin. Early research suggests that taking capsules containing krill oil, zinc, vitamin D, sea buckthorn berry oil, cacao bean extract, hyaluronic acid, and red clover isoflavones 780 mg three times daily along with applying tazarotene cream 0.1% nightly for about 12 weeks improves wrinkles, moisture, and elasticity in aging skin compared to treatment with tazarotene cream alone. It is not clear if these benefits were due to krill oil or other ingredients in the supplement.
  • High cholesterol. Developing research shows that taking 1-1.5 grams of a specific krill oil product daily reduces total cholesterol and "bad" low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, and increases "good" high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in patients with high cholesterol. Higher doses of 2-3 grams daily also appear to significantly reduce levels of triglyceride, another type of blood fat.
  • High triglycerides, a type of blood fat. Taking a specific krill oil product 0.25-2 grams twice daily for 12 weeks appears to lower triglyceride levels in people with high triglyceride levels. However, the change in triglyceride levels varies among patients. The supplement does not appear to improve total cholesterol, "bad" low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, or "good" high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol.
  • Osteoarthritis. Early research shows that taking 300 mg per day of a specific krill oil product reduces pain and stiffness in people with osteoarthritis.
  • Premenstrual syndrome (PMS). Early research shows that taking 2 grams per day of a specific krill oil product might reduce PMS symptoms. Also, taking a specific combination product containing krill oil, B vitamins, soy isoflavones, and rosemary extract daily for 3 months reduces self-reported PMS symptoms. The improvements appear to be greatest for women with more severe symptoms. However, it is unclear if these improvements were due to krill oil or other ingredients in the supplement.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis. Early research shows that taking 300 mg per day of a specific krill oil product reduces pain and stiffness in people with rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Cancer.
  • Depression.
  • High blood pressure.
  • Stroke.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of krill oil for these uses.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

Krill oil is POSSIBLY SAFE for most adults when used appropriately for a short amount of time (up to three months). The most common side effects of krill oil are stomach-related and similar to those of fish oil. These effects include stomach discomfort, decreased appetite, taste change, heartburn, fishy burps, bloating, gas, diarrhea, and nausea. Taking krill oil by mouth might also cause facial skin to become oilier or to break out. In very rare cases, krill oil might increase blood pressure.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of krill oil during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Bleeding disorders: Because krill oil can slow blood clotting, there is concern that it might increase the risk of bleeding in people with bleeding disorders. Until more is known, people with such conditions should use krill oil cautiously.

Diabetes: Krill oil might lower blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. Watch for signs of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and monitor your blood sugar carefully if you have diabetes and use krill oil.

Obesity: Krill oil might lower how well insulin works in people who are overweight or obese. This might increase the risk of developing diabetes or heart disease.

Seafood allergy: Some people who are allergic to seafood might also be allergic to krill oil supplements. There is no reliable information showing how likely people with seafood allergy are to have an allergic reaction to krill oil; however, until more is known, avoid using krill oil or use it cautiously if you have a seafood allergy.

Surgery: Because krill oil can slow blood clotting, there is concern that it might increase the risk of bleeding during and after surgery. Stop using krill oil at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Interactions

Interactions?

Moderate Interaction

Be cautious with this combination

!
  • Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs interacts with KRILL OIL

    Krill oil might slow blood clotting. Taking krill oil along with medications that also slow clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding.<br><nb>Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen (Anaprox, Naprosyn, others), dalteparin (Fragmin), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin, warfarin (Coumadin), and others.

Minor Interaction

Be watchful with this combination

!
  • Orlistat (Xenical, Alli) interacts with KRILL OIL

    Orlistat (Xenical, Alli) is used for weight loss. It prevents dietary fats from being absorbed from the gut. There is some concern that orlistat (Xenical, Alli) might also decrease absorption of krill oil when they are taken together. To avoid this potential interaction take orlistat (Xenical, Alli) and krill oil at least 2 hours apart.

Dosing

Dosing

The appropriate dose of krill oil depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for krill oil. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

View References

REFERENCES:

  • Banni, S., Carta, G., Murru, E., Cordeddu, L., Giordano, E., Sirigu, A. R., Berge, K., Vik, H., Maki, K. C., Di, Marzo, V, and Griinari, M. Krill oil significantly decreases 2-arachidonoylglycerol plasma levels in obese subjects. Nutr Metab (Lond) 2011;8(1):7. View abstract.
  • Bengtson Nash, S. M., Poulsen, A. H., Kawaguchi, S., Vetter, W., and Schlabach, M. Persistent organohalogen contaminant burdens in Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) from the eastern Antarctic sector: a baseline study. Sci Total Environ 12-15-2008;407(1):304-314. View abstract.
  • Gigliotti, J. C., Smith, A. L., Jaczynski, J., and Tou, J. C. Consumption of krill protein concentrate prevents early renal injury and nephrocalcinosis in female Sprague-Dawley rats. Urol.Res 2011;39(1):59-67. View abstract.
  • Hellgren, K. Assessment of Krillase chewing gum for the reduction of gingivitis and dental plaque. J Clin Dent 2009;20(3):99-102. View abstract.
  • Ierna, M., Kerr, A., Scales, H., Berge, K., and Griinari, M. Supplementation of diet with krill oil protects against experimental rheumatoid arthritis. BMC Musculoskelet.Disord. 2010;11:136. View abstract.
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  • Maki, K. C., Reeves, M. S., Farmer, M., Griinari, M., Berge, K., Vik, H., Hubacher, R., and Rains, T. M. Krill oil supplementation increases plasma concentrations of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids in overweight and obese men and women. Nutr.Res. 2009;29(9):609-615. View abstract.
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  • Goldberg LD, Crysler C. A single center, pilot, double-blinded, randomized, comparative, prospective clinical study to evaluate improvements in the structure and function of facial skin with tazarotene 0.1% cream alone and in combination with GliSODin Skin Nutrients Advanced Anti-Aging Formula. Clin Cosmet Investig Dermatol. 2014;7:139-44. View abstract.
  • Harris WS, Miller M, Tighe AP, et al. Omega-3 fatty acids and coronary heart disease risk: clinical and mechanistic perspectives. Atherosclerosis 2008;197:12-24. View abstract.
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  • Kwantes JM, Grundmann O. A brief review of krill oil history, research, and the commercial market. J Diet Suppl 2015;12(1):23-35. View abstract.
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  • Multi-center, double-blind, placebo-controlled, monotherapy study of Neptune Krill oil (NKO&#8482;) in early stage Alzheimer's disease. 2009;
  • Sampalis F, Bunea R, Pelland MF, et al. Evaluation of the effects of Neptune Krill Oil on the management of premenstrual syndrome and dysmenorrhea. Altern Med Rev 2003;8:171-9. View abstract.
  • Tandy S, Chung RW, Wat E, et al. Dietary krill oil supplementation reduces hepatic steatosis, glycemia, and hypercholesterolemia in high-fat-fed mice. J Agric Food Chem 10-14-2009;57:9339-45. View abstract.
  • Ulven SM, Kirkhus B, Lamglait A, et al. Metabolic effects of krill oil are essentially similar to those of fish oil but at lower dose of EPA and DHA, in healthy volunteers. Lipids 2011;46:37-46. View abstract.
  • Venkatraman JT, Chandrasekar B, Kim JD, Fernandes G. Effects of n-3 and n-6 fatty acids on the activities and expression of hepatic antioxidant enzymes in autoimmune-prone NZBxNZW F1 mice. Lipids 1994;29:561-8. View abstract.
  • Wakeman MP. An open-label pilot study to assess the effectiveness of krill oil with added vitamins and phytonutrients in the relief of symptoms of PMS. Nutrition Dietary Suppl 2013:5;17-25.

More Resources for KRILL OIL

CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

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