SCELETIUM

OTHER NAME(S):

Canna, Canna Root, Channa, Kanna, Kaugoed, Kauwgoed, Kougoed, Mesembryanthemum tortuosum, Phyllobolus tortuosus, Poudre de Sceletium, Racine de Kanna, Racine de Sceletium, Sceletium Powder, Sceletium Root, Sceletium tortuosum, Skeletium.

Overview

Overview Information

Sceletium is a succulent, ground-cover plant from South Africa. It has a long history of use as a traditional medicine by native peoples of South Africa. Some people also use sceletium to get "high."

People use sceletium for anxiety, depression, and many other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these uses.

How does it work?

Sceletium contains chemicals that are thought to work in the brain to cause sleepiness and other effects.

Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Insufficient Evidence for

  • Alcohol use disorder.
  • Anxiety.
  • Depression.
  • Obesity.
  • Pain.
  • Stress.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate sceletium for these uses.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

When taken by mouth: There isn't enough reliable information to know if sceletium is safe. Some people who have used sceletium report side effects including headache, loss of appetite, and depression.

When inhaled: There isn't enough reliable information to know if sceletium is safe or what the side effects might be.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There isn't enough reliable information to know if sceletium is safe to used when pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid using.

Interactions

Interactions?

We currently have no information for SCELETIUM Interactions.

Dosing

Dosing

The appropriate dose of sceletium depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for sceletium. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

View References

REFERENCES:

  • Patnala S, Kanfer I. Investigations of the phytochemical content of Sceletium tortuosum following the preparation of "Kougoed" by fermentation of plant material. J Ethnopharmacol 2009;121:86-91. View abstract.
  • Smith C. The effects of Sceletium tortuosum in an in vivo model of psychological stress. J Ethnopharmacol 2011;133:31-6. View abstract.
  • Smith MT, Crouch NR, Gericke N, Hirst M. Psychoactive constituents of the genus Sceletium N.E.Br. and other Mesembryanthemaceae: a review. J Ethnopharmacol 1996;50:119-30. View abstract.
  • Smith MT, Field CR, Crouch NR, Hirst M. The Distribution of Mesembrine Alkaloids in Selected Taxa of Kanna and their Modification in the Sceletium Derived `Kougoed.' Pharm Biol 1998;36:173-9.
  • Bennett AC, Smith C. Immunomodulatory effects of Sceletium tortuosum (Trimesemine) elucidated in vitro: Implications for chronic disease. J Ethnopharmacol. 2018;214:134-40. doi: 10.1016/j.jep.2017.12.020. View abstract.
  • Bennett AC, Van Camp A, López V, Smith C. Sceletium tortuosum may delay chronic disease progression via alkaloid-dependent antioxidant or anti-inflammatory action. J Physiol Biochem. 2018;74(4):539-47. doi: 10.1007/s13105-018-0620-6. View abstract.
  • Harvey AL, Young LC, Viljoen AM, Gericke NP. Pharmacological actions of the South African medicinal and functional food plant Sceletium tortuosum and its principal alkaloids. J Ethnopharmacol. 2011;137(3):1124-9. doi: 10.1016/j.jep.2011.07.035. View abstract.
  • Meyer GMJ, Wink CSD, Zapp J, Maurer HH. GC-MS, LC-MS(n), LC-high resolution-MS(n), and NMR studies on the metabolism and toxicological detection of mesembrine and mesembrenone, the main alkaloids of the legal high "Kanna" isolated from Sceletium tortuosum. Anal Bioanal Chem. 2015;407(3):761-78. doi: 10.1007/s00216-014-8109-9. View abstract.
  • Nell H, Siebert M, Chellan P, Gericke N. A randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled trial of Extract Sceletium tortuosum (Zembrin) in healthy adults. J Altern Complement Med. 2013;19(11):898-904. doi: 10.1089/acm.2012.0185. View abstract.
  • Patnala S, Kanfer I. Investigations of the phytochemical content of Sceletium tortuosum following the preparation of "Kougoed" by fermentation of plant material. J Ethnopharmacol 2009;121:86-91. View abstract.
  • Smith C. The effects of Sceletium tortuosum in an in vivo model of psychological stress. J Ethnopharmacol 2011;133:31-6. View abstract.
  • Smith MT, Crouch NR, Gericke N, Hirst M. Psychoactive constituents of the genus Sceletium N.E.Br. and other Mesembryanthemaceae: a review. J Ethnopharmacol 1996;50:119-30. View abstract.
  • Smith MT, Field CR, Crouch NR, Hirst M. The Distribution of Mesembrine Alkaloids in Selected Taxa of Kanna and their Modification in the Sceletium Derived `Kougoed.' Pharm Biol 1998;36:173-9.
  • Terburg D, Syal S, Rosenberger LA, et al. Acute effects of Sceletium tortuosum (Zembrin), a dual 5-HT reuptake and PDE4 inhibitor, in the human amygdala and its connection to the hypothalamus. Neuropsychopharmacology. 2013;38(13):2708-16. doi: 10.1038/npp.2013.183. View abstract.

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CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version.
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