CAFFEIC ACID

OTHER NAME(S):

3,4-DA, 3,4-Dihydroxycinnamic acid, 3,4-Dihydroxycinnamic Acid, 2-Propenoic Acid, 3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl), 3-(3,4-Dihydroxy Phenyl)-2-Propenoic Acid, 3-(3,4-Dihydroxyphenyl)Propenoic Acid, 3,4-Dihydroxybenzeneacrylic Acid, 4-(2-Carboxyethenyl)-1,2-Dihydroxybenzene, 4-(2'-Carboxyvinyl)-1,2-Dihydroxybenzene, (2E)-3-(3,4-Dihydroxyphenyl)-2-Propenoic Acid, Acide Caféique, Ácido Cafeico.<br/><br/>

Overview

Overview Information

Caffeic acid is a chemical found in many plants and foods. Coffee is the primary source of caffeic acid in the human diet. However, it can be found in other food sources such as apples, artichoke, berries, and pears. Wine also contains a significant amount of caffeic acid.

Caffeic acid is used in supplements for boosting athletic performance, exercise-related fatigue, weight loss, cancer, HIV/AIDS, herpes, and other conditions.

How does it work?

Caffeic acid is thought to have many effects in the body including antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. It might also affect the immune system in the body. Test tube studies show that it might decrease the growth of cancer cells and viruses. Animal studies show that it might have a mild stimulant effect and reduce fatigue related to exercise. The effects of caffeic acid when taken by people are not known.

Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Insufficient Evidence for

More evidence is needed to rate caffeic acid for these uses.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

There is not enough information to know if caffeic acid is safe when taken as a supplement. Caffeic acid is contained in many foods we eat, however, taking purified caffeic acid as a supplement has not been studied in people.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There is not enough information to know if caffeic acid when taken as a supplement is safe during pregnancy and breast feeding. It should be avoided.

Insomnia. Caffeic acid might have a mild stimulating effect that could possibly worsen insomnia. However, this effect is modest and substantially less than caffeine.

Interactions

Interactions?

We currently have no information for CAFFEIC ACID Interactions.

Dosing

Dosing

The appropriate dose of caffeic acid depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for caffeic acid. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

View References

REFERENCES:

  • Chang WC, Hsieh CH, Hsiao MW, et al. Caffeic acid induces apoptosis in human cervical cancer cells through the mitochondrial pathway. Taiwan J Obstet Gynecol 2010;49:419-24. View abstract.
  • Chung TW, Moon SK, Chang YC, et al. Novel and therapeutic effect of caffeic acid and caffeic acid phenyl ester on hepatocarcinoma cells: complete regression of hepatoma growth and metastasis by dual mechanism. FASEB J 2004;18:1670-81. View abstract.
  • Dayman J, Jepson JB. The metabolism of caffeic acid in humans: the dehydroxylating action of intestinal bacteria. Biochem J 1969;113(2):11P. View abstract.
  • Farah A, Donangelo CM. Phenolic compounds in coffee. Braz J Plant Physiol 2006;18:23-36.
  • Ferreira PG, Lima MA, Bernedo-Navarro RA, et al. Stimulation of acidic reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide by soybean phenolics: possible relevance to gastrointestinal host defense. J Agric Food Chem 2011;59:5609-19. View abstract.
  • Ikeda K, Tsujimoto K, Uozaki M, et al. Inhibition of multiplication of herpes simplex virus by caffeic acid. Int J Mol Med 2011;28:595-8. View abstract.
  • Kim JH, Lee BJ, Kim JH, et al. Antiangiogenic effect of caffeic acid on retinal neovascularization. Vascul Pharmacol 2009;51:262-7. View abstract.
  • Nardini M, D'Aquino M, Tomassi G, et al. Inhibition of human low-density lipoprotein oxidation by caffeic acid and other hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives. Free Radic Biol Med 1995;19:541-52. View abstract.
  • Novaes RD, Gonçalves RV, Peluzio Mdo C, et al. 3,4-Dihydroxycinnamic acid attenuates the fatigue and improves exercise tolerance in rats. Biosci Biotechnol Biochem 2012;76:1025-7. View abstract.
  • Ohnishi R, Ito H, Iguchi A, et al. Effects of chlorogenic acid and its metabolites on spontaneous locomotor activity in mice. Biosci Biotechnol Biochem 2006;70:2560-3. View abstract.
  • Olthol MR, Hollman PCH, Katan MB. Chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid are absorbed in humans. J Nutr 2001;131:66-71. View abstract.
  • Renouf M, Guy PA, Marmet C, et al. Measurement of caffeic and ferulic acid equivalents in plasma after coffee consumption: small intestine and colon are key sites for coffee metabolism. Mol Nutr Food Res 2010;54:760-6. View abstract.
  • Shinomiya K, Omichi J, Ohnishi R, et al. Effects of chlorogenic acid and its metabolites on the sleep-wakefulness cycle in rats. Eur J Pharmacol 2004;504:185-9. View abstract.
  • Simonetti P, Gardana C, Pietta P. Plasma levels of caffeic acid and antioxidant status after red wine intake. J Agric Food Chem 2001;49:5964-8. View abstract.
  • Uwai Y, Ozeki Y, Isaka T, et al. Inhibitory effect of caffeic acid on human organic anion transporters hOAT1 and hOAT3: a novel candidate for food-drug interaction. Drug Metab Pharmacokinet 2011;26:486-93. View abstract.
  • Wallerath T, Li H, Godtel-Ambrust U, et al. A blend of polyphenolic compounds explains the stimulatory effect of red wine on human endothelial NO synthase. Nitric Oxide 2005;12:97-104. View abstract.
  • Wang LH, Hsu KY, Uang YS, et al. Caffeic acid improves the bioavailability of L-dopa in rabbit plasma. Phytother Res 2010;24:852-8. View abstract.
  • Chang WC, Hsieh CH, Hsiao MW, et al. Caffeic acid induces apoptosis in human cervical cancer cells through the mitochondrial pathway. Taiwan J Obstet Gynecol 2010;49:419-24. View abstract.
  • Chung TW, Moon SK, Chang YC, et al. Novel and therapeutic effect of caffeic acid and caffeic acid phenyl ester on hepatocarcinoma cells: complete regression of hepatoma growth and metastasis by dual mechanism. FASEB J 2004;18:1670-81. View abstract.
  • Dayman J, Jepson JB. The metabolism of caffeic acid in humans: the dehydroxylating action of intestinal bacteria. Biochem J 1969;113(2):11P. View abstract.
  • Farah A, Donangelo CM. Phenolic compounds in coffee. Braz J Plant Physiol 2006;18:23-36.
  • Ferreira PG, Lima MA, Bernedo-Navarro RA, et al. Stimulation of acidic reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide by soybean phenolics: possible relevance to gastrointestinal host defense. J Agric Food Chem 2011;59:5609-19. View abstract.
  • Ikeda K, Tsujimoto K, Uozaki M, et al. Inhibition of multiplication of herpes simplex virus by caffeic acid. Int J Mol Med 2011;28:595-8. View abstract.
  • Kim JH, Lee BJ, Kim JH, et al. Antiangiogenic effect of caffeic acid on retinal neovascularization. Vascul Pharmacol 2009;51:262-7. View abstract.
  • Nardini M, D'Aquino M, Tomassi G, et al. Inhibition of human low-density lipoprotein oxidation by caffeic acid and other hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives. Free Radic Biol Med 1995;19:541-52. View abstract.
  • Novaes RD, Gonçalves RV, Peluzio Mdo C, et al. 3,4-Dihydroxycinnamic acid attenuates the fatigue and improves exercise tolerance in rats. Biosci Biotechnol Biochem 2012;76:1025-7. View abstract.
  • Ohnishi R, Ito H, Iguchi A, et al. Effects of chlorogenic acid and its metabolites on spontaneous locomotor activity in mice. Biosci Biotechnol Biochem 2006;70:2560-3. View abstract.
  • Olthol MR, Hollman PCH, Katan MB. Chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid are absorbed in humans. J Nutr 2001;131:66-71. View abstract.
  • Renouf M, Guy PA, Marmet C, et al. Measurement of caffeic and ferulic acid equivalents in plasma after coffee consumption: small intestine and colon are key sites for coffee metabolism. Mol Nutr Food Res 2010;54:760-6. View abstract.
  • Shinomiya K, Omichi J, Ohnishi R, et al. Effects of chlorogenic acid and its metabolites on the sleep-wakefulness cycle in rats. Eur J Pharmacol 2004;504:185-9. View abstract.
  • Simonetti P, Gardana C, Pietta P. Plasma levels of caffeic acid and antioxidant status after red wine intake. J Agric Food Chem 2001;49:5964-8. View abstract.
  • Uwai Y, Ozeki Y, Isaka T, et al. Inhibitory effect of caffeic acid on human organic anion transporters hOAT1 and hOAT3: a novel candidate for food-drug interaction. Drug Metab Pharmacokinet 2011;26:486-93. View abstract.
  • Wallerath T, Li H, Godtel-Ambrust U, et al. A blend of polyphenolic compounds explains the stimulatory effect of red wine on human endothelial NO synthase. Nitric Oxide 2005;12:97-104. View abstract.
  • Wang LH, Hsu KY, Uang YS, et al. Caffeic acid improves the bioavailability of L-dopa in rabbit plasma. Phytother Res 2010;24:852-8. View abstract.

More Resources for CAFFEIC ACID

CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

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