ROOIBOS

OTHER NAME(S):

Aspalathus linearis, Aspalathus contaminatus, Borbonia pinifolia, Green Red Bush, Infusion Rooibos, Kaffree Tea, Psoralea linearis, Red Bush, Red Bush Tea, Rooibos Rouge, Rooibos Tea, Té Rojo, Té Rojo Rooibos, Thé Rooibos, Thé Rouge.

Overview

Overview Information

Rooibos is a fragrant, caffeine-free tea. It is made from the leaves and stems of a tree called Aspalathus linearis. This tree grows in South Africa, where rooibos tea is the national drink.

Rooibos is used for hay fever, preventing cancer, preventing heart disease, indigestion (dyspepsia), and other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these uses.

How does it work?

Rooibos contains chemicals that might protect the heart and might also prevent age-related changes in the brain.

Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Insufficient Evidence for

  • Hay fever.
  • Anxiety.
  • Heart disease.
  • Indigestion (dyspepsia).
  • HIV/AIDS.
  • Preventing cancer.
  • Preventing decline in memory and thinking skills that occurs normally with age.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of rooibos for these uses.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

When taken by mouth: Rooibos is LIKELY SAFE for most people when used as a beverage in normal food amounts. But drinking large amounts of rooibos tea, such as 10 cups per day, for over a year can cause liver problems in some people.

There isn't enough information available to know if rooibos is safe to use as a medicine.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There isn't enough reliable information to know if rooibos is safe to use when pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Interactions

Interactions?

We currently have no information for ROOIBOS Interactions.

Dosing

Dosing

The appropriate dose of rooibos depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for rooibos. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

View References

REFERENCES:

  • Bramati L, Aquilano F, Pietta P. Unfermented rooibos tea: quantitative characterization of flavonoids by HPLC-UV and determination of the total antioxidant activity. J Agric Food Chem 2003;51(25):7472-7474. View abstract.
  • Kunishiro K, Tai A, Yamamoto I. Effects of rooibos tea extract on antigen-specific antibody production and cytokine generation in vitro and in vivo. Biosci Biotechnol Biochem 2001;65(10):2137-2145. View abstract.
  • Standley L, Winterton P, Marnewick JL, et al. Influence of processing stages on antimutagenic and antioxidant potentials of rooibos tea. J Agric Food Chem 2001;49(1):114-117. View abstract.
  • Ulicna O, Greksak M, Vancova O, et al. Hepatoprotective effect of rooibos tea (Aspalathus linearis) on CCl4-induced liver damage in rats. Physiol Res 2003;52(4):461-466. View abstract.
  • Ulicna O, Vancova O, Bozek P, et al. Rooibos tea (Aspalathus linearis) partially prevents oxidative stress in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Physiol Res 2005; View abstract.
  • Fantoukh OI, Dale OR, Parveen A, et al. Safety Assessment of Phytochemicals Derived from the Globalized South African Rooibos Tea (Aspalathus linearis) through Interaction with CYP, PXR, and P-gp. J Agric Food Chem. 2019;67(17):4967-4975. View abstract.
  • Inanami O, Asanuma T, Inukai N, et al. The suppression of age-related accumulation of lipid peroxides in rat brain by administration of Rooibos tea (Aspalathus linearis). Neurosci Lett 1995;196:85-8. View abstract.
  • Marnewick JL, Rautenbach F, Venter I, et al. Effects of rooibos (Aspalathus linearis) on oxidative stress and biochemical parameters in adults at risk for cardiovascular disease. J Ethnopharmacol. 2011;133(1):46-52. View abstract.
  • Nakano M, Itoh Y, Mizuno T, Nakashima H. Polysaccharide from Aspalathus linearis with strong anti-HIV activity. Biosci Biotechnol Biochem 1997;61:267-71. View abstract.
  • Nakano M, Nakashima H, Itoh Y. Anti-human immunodeficiency virus activity of oligosaccharides from rooibos tea (Aspalathus linearis) extracts in vitro. Leukemia 1997;11:128-30. View abstract.
  • Persson IA, Persson K, Hägg S, Andersson RG. Effects of green tea, black tea and Rooibos tea on angiotensin-converting enzyme and nitric oxide in healthy volunteers. Public Health Nutr. 2010;13(5):730-7. View abstract.
  • Reddy S, Mishra P, Qureshi S, Nair S, Straker T. Hepatotoxicity due to red bush tea consumption: a case report. J Clin Anesth. 2016;35:96-98. View abstract.
  • Shimoi K, Masuda S, Shen B, et al. Radioprotective effects of antioxidative plant flavonoids in mice. Mutat Res 1996;350:153-61. View abstract.
  • Yang S, Lee C, Lee BS, Park EK, Kim KM, Bae JS. Renal protective effects of aspalathin and nothofagin from rooibos (Aspalathus linearis) in a mouse model of sepsis. Pharmacol Rep. 2018;70(6):1195-1201. View abstract.

Vitamins Survey

Have you ever purchased ROOIBOS?

Did you or will you purchase this product in-store or online?

Where did you or where do you plan to purchase this product?

Where did you or where do you plan to purchase this product?

What factors influenced or will influence your purchase? (check all that apply)

Vitamins Survey

Where did you or where do you plan to purchase this product?

Do you buy vitamins online or instore?

What factors are most important to you? (check all that apply)

This survey is being conducted by the WebMD marketing sciences department.Read More

More Resources for ROOIBOS

CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version.
© Therapeutic Research Faculty .