STREPTOCOCCUS THERMOPHILUS

OTHER NAME(S):

S. thermophilus, Streptococcus thermophiles, Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophiles.

Overview

Overview Information

Streptococcus thermophilus is a type of probiotic bacteria. These are "friendly" bacteria that normally live in our digestive, urinary, and genital systems without causing disease. Streptococcus thermophilus is commonly used to produce fermented dairy foods such as yogurt. It is also used in dietary supplements.

Streptococcus thermophilus is most commonly taken by mouth to treat and prevent diarrhea, constipation, diabetes, and many other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these uses.

How does it work?

Streptococcus thermophilus belongs to a group of bacteria called lactic acid bacteria. Lactic acid bacteria are found in fermented foods such as yogurt and cheese. Streptococcus thermophilus are used as so-called "probiotics," the opposite of antibiotics. "Friendly" bacteria such as Streptococcus thermophilus can help us break down food, absorb nutrients, and fight off "unfriendly" organisms that might cause diseases such as diarrhea.

Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Insufficient Evidence for

  • Diarrhea in people taking antibiotics (antibiotic-associated diarrhea).
  • Child growth.
  • Excessive crying in infants (colic).
  • Constipation.
  • Diabetes.
  • Diarrhea.
  • Muscle soreness caused by exercise.
  • HIV/AIDS.
  • A long-term disorder of the large intestines that causes stomach pain (irritable bowel syndrome or IBS).
  • A serious intestinal disease in premature infants (necrotizing enterocolitis or NEC).
  • Build up of fat in the liver in people who drink little or no alcohol (nonalcoholic fatty liver disease or NAFLD).
  • Swelling (inflammation) and build up of fat in the liver in people who drink little or no alcohol (nonalcoholic steatohepatitis or NASH).
  • Swelling (inflammation) and sores inside the mouth (oral mucositis).
  • Ear infection (otitis media).
  • A complication after surgery for ulcerative colitis (pouchitis).
  • Diarrhea caused by rotavirus.
  • Blood infection (sepsis).
  • Excessive growth of bacteria in the small intestines.
  • A type of inflammatory bowel disease (ulcerative colitis).
  • Overgrowth of bacteria in the vagina, when applied directly.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate Streptococcus thermophilus for these uses.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

When taken by mouth: Streptococcus thermophilus is LIKELY SAFE when taken by mouth. There are no known side effects.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Children: Streptococcus thermophilus is POSSIBLY SAFE in children when taken by mouth appropriately for up to 1 year.

Pregnancy: Streptococcus thermophilus is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth appropriately for 8 weeks while pregnant.

Breast-feeding: There isn't enough reliable information to know if Streptococcus thermophilus is safe to use when breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Interactions

Interactions?

We currently have no information for STREPTOCOCCUS THERMOPHILUS Interactions.

Dosing

Dosing

The appropriate dose of Streptococcus thermophilus depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time, there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for Streptococcus thermophilus. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

View References

REFERENCES:

  • Aller R, De Luis DA, Izaola O, et al. Effect of a probiotic on liver aminotransferases in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease patients: a double blind randomized clinical trial. Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci. 2011;15(9):1090-5. View abstract.
  • Bibiloni R, Fedorak RN, Tannock GW, et al. VSL#3 probiotic-mixture induces remission in patients with active ulcerative colitis. Am J Gastroenterol 2005;100:1539-46. View abstract.
  • Bouhnik Y, Pochart P, Marteau P, et al. Fecal recovery in humans of viable bifidobacterium ingested in fermented milk. Gastroenterology 1992;102:875-8. View abstract.
  • Canani RB, Cirillo P, Terrin G, et al. Probiotics for treatment of acute diarrhoea in children: randomised clinical trial of five different preparations. BMJ. 2007;335(7615):340. View abstract.
  • Chen RM, Wu JJ, Lee SC, et al. Increase of intestinal Bifidobacterium and suppression of coliform bacteria with short-term yogurt ingestion. J Dairy Sci 1999:82:2308-14. View abstract.
  • Cohen R, Martin E, de La Rocque F, Thollot F, Pecquet S, Werner A, Boucherat M, Varon E, Bingen E, Levy C. Probiotics and prebiotics in preventing episodes of acute otitis media in high-risk children: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Pediatr Infect Dis J 2013;32(8):810-4. View abstract.
  • Colombel JF, Cortot A, Neut C, Romond C. Yoghurt with Bifidobacterium longum reduces erythromycin-induced gastrointestinal effects. Lancet 1987;2:43.
  • Corrêa NB, Péret Filho LA, Penna FJ, Lima FM, Nicoli JR. A randomized formula controlled trial of Bifidobacterium lactis and Streptococcus thermophilus for prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea in infants. J Clin Gastroenterol. 2005;39(5):385-9. View abstract.
  • Dolatkhah N, Hajifaraji M, Abbasalizadeh F, Aghamohammadzadeh N, Mehrabi Y, Abbasi MM. Is there a value for probiotic supplements in gestational diabetes mellitus? A randomized clinical trial. J Health Popul Nutr. 2015;33:25. View abstract.
  • Gionchetti P, Rizzello F, Venturi A, et al. Oral bacteriotherapy as maintenance treatment in patients with chronic pouchitis: a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Gastroenterology 2000;119:305-9. View abstract.
  • Han K, Wang J, Seo JG, Kim H. Efficacy of double-coated probiotics for irritable bowel syndrome: a randomized double-blind controlled trial. J Gastroenterol. 2017;52(4):432-443. View abstract.
  • Hickson M, D'Souza AL, Muthu N, et al. Use of probiotic Lactobacillus preparation to prevent diarrhoea associated with antibiotics: randomised double blind placebo controlled trial. BMJ 2007;335(7610):80. View abstract.
  • Jacobs SE, Tobin JM, Opie GF, et al. Probiotic effects on late-onset sepsis in very preterm infants: a randomized controlled trial. Pediatrics. 2013;132(6):1055-62. View abstract.
  • Jäger R, Purpura M, Stone JD, et al. Probiotic Streptococcus thermophilus FP4 and Bifidobacterium breve BR03 supplementation attenuates performance and range-of-motion decrements following muscle damaging exercise. Nutrients 2016;8(10). pii: E642. View abstract.
  • Ki Cha B, Mun Jung S, Hwan Choi C, et al. The effect of a multispecies probiotic mixture on the symptoms and fecal microbiota in diarrhea-dominant irritable bowel syndrome: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. J Clin Gastroenterol. 2012;46(3):220-7. View abstract.
  • Kianifar H, Ahanchian H, Grover Z, et al. Synbiotic in the management of infantile colic: a randomised controlled trial. J Paediatr Child Health. 2014;50(10):801-5. View abstract.
  • Kim HJ, Camilleri M, McKinzie S, et al. A randomized controlled trial of a probiotic, VSL#3, on gut transit and symptoms in diarrhoea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. Aliment Pharmacol Ther 2003;17:895-904. . View abstract.
  • Kwak DS, Jun DW, Seo JG, et al. Short-term probiotic therapy alleviates small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, but does not improve intestinal permeability in chronic liver disease. Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2014;26(12):1353-9. View abstract.
  • Li D, Li Q, Liu C, et al. Efficacy and safety of probiotics in the treatment of Candida-associated stomatitis. Mycoses. 2014;57(3):141-6. View abstract.
  • Manzhalii E, Virchenko O, Falalyeyeva T, Beregova T, Stremmel W. Treatment efficacy of a probiotic preparation for non-alcoholic steatohepatitis: A pilot trial. J Dig Dis. 2017;18(12):698-703. View abstract.
  • Miele E, Pascarella F, Giannetti E. et al. Effect of a probiotic preparation (VSL#3) on induction and maintenance of remission in children with ulcerative colitis. Am J Gastroenterol 2009;104:437-43. View abstract.
  • Mimura T, Rizzello F, Helwig U, et al. Once daily high dose probiotic therapy (VSL#3) for maintaining remission in recurrent or refractory pouchitis. Gut 2004;53:108-14. View abstract.
  • Nopchinda S, Varavithya W, Phuapradit P, et al. Effect of bifidobacterium Bb12 with or without Streptococcus thermophilus supplemented formula on nutritional status. J Med Assoc Thai. 2002;85 Suppl 4:S1225-31. View abstract.
  • Phuapradit P, Varavithya W, Vathanophas K, et al. Reduction of rotavirus infection in children receiving bifidobacteria-supplemented formula. J Med Assoc Thai 1999;82:S43-8. View abstract.
  • Razmpoosh E, Javadi A, Ejtahed HS, Mirmiran P, Javadi M, Yousefinejad A. The effect of probiotic supplementation on glycemic control and lipid profile in patients with type 2 diabetes: A randomized placebo controlled trial. Diabetes Metab Syndr. 2019;13(1):175-182. View abstract.
  • Saavedra JM, et al. Feeding of bifidobacterium bifidum and streptococcus thermophilus to infants in hospital for prevention of diarrhea and shedding of rotavirus. Lancet 1994;344:1046-9. View abstract.
  • Shen J, Zuo ZX, Mao AP. Effect of probiotics on inducing remission and maintaining therapy in ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, and pouchitis: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2014;20(1):21-35. View abstract.
  • Trois L, Cardoso EM, Miura E. Use of probiotics in HIV-infected children: a randomized double-blind controlled study. J Trop Pediatr. 2008;54(1):19-24. View abstract.
  • Tursi A, Brandimarte G, Giorgetti GM, et al. Low-dose balsalazide plus a high-potency probiotic preparation is more effective than balsalazide alone or mesalazine in the treatment of acute mild-to-moderate ulcerative colitis. Med Sci Monit 2004;10:PI126-31. View abstract.
  • van den Akker CHP, van Goudoever JB, Szajewska H, et al. Probiotics for Preterm Infants: A Strain-Specific Systematic Review and Network Meta-analysis. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2018;67(1):103-122. View abstract.
  • Venturi A, Gionchetti P, Rizzello F, et al. Impact on the composition of the faecal flora by a new probiotic preparation: preliminary data on maintenance treatment of patients with ulcerative colitis. Aliment Pharmacol Ther 1999;13:1103-8. View abstract.
  • Ya W, Reifer C, Miller LE. Efficacy of vaginal probiotic capsules for recurrent bacterial vaginosis: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2010;203(2):120.e1-6. View abstract.
  • Yoon JS, Sohn W, Lee OY, et al. Effect of multispecies probiotics on irritable bowel syndrome: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2014;29(1):52-9. View abstract.
  • Yoon JY, Cha JM, Oh JK, et al. Probiotics Ameliorate Stool Consistency in Patients with Chronic Constipation: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study. Dig Dis Sci. 2018;63(10):2754-2764. View abstract.

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