SOYBEAN OIL

OTHER NAME(S):

Aceite de Soja, Dolichos soja, Glycine gracilis, Glycine hispida, Glycine max, Glycine soja, Huile de Germes de Soja, Huile de Germes de Soya, Huile de Soja, Huile de Soya, Intralipid, Intralipide, Legume, Légumineuse, Phaseolus max, Soja hispida, Soja max, Soy Bean Oil, Soy Oil, Soya Oil, Soyca, Travmulsion.<br/><br/>

Overview

Overview Information

Soybean oil is produced from the seeds of the soybean plant.

Plant sterols, chemicals derived from soybean oil, are used to lower total cholesterol and “bad” low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. Specially processed soybean oil is used to treat osteoarthritis.

Some people apply soybean oil directly to the skin to repel mosquitoes and other insects.

Soybean oil is also used as a nutritional supplement in intravenous feedings.

How does it work?

Soybean oil works to lower cholesterol levels by decreasing cholesterol absorption in the gut. Specific processed parts of soybean oil called unsaponifiables may have a beneficial effect on joints.

Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Effective for

  • Use as a nutritional supplement in intravenous feedings.

Likely Effective for

  • Preventing mosquito bites when applied to the skin. Soybean oil is an ingredient in some commercial mosquito repellents. It seems to work about as well as some other mosquito repellents including some products that contain a small amount of DEET.

Possibly Effective for

  • Lowering cholesterol levels in people with high cholesterol. Soybean oil plant sterols used in margarine seem to help lower total cholesterol and “bad” LDL cholesterol without affecting “good” HDL. The FDA has allowed the makers of the products Take Control and Benecol to include this claim on their labels.
  • Osteoarthritis, when a specific processed part of the oil (unsaponifiable fractions) is used in combination with avocado oil. This combination seems to significantly improve pain and overall disability. It appears to work better for osteoarthritis of the hip than the knee.
Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

Soybean oil is safe for most adults when taken by mouth in amounts normally found in food and when applied to the skin as an insect repellent in recommended amounts. Pharmaceutical quality soybean oil is also safe when used as a nutritional supplement in intravenous feedings. The processed soybean oil (unsaponifiable fractions of soybean oil) has been used safely in research studies for up to 6 months.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Soybean oil is safe for pregnant and breast-feeding women when used as part of the diet. But the safety of soybean oil during pregnancy and breast-feeding is not known when used in amounts greater than those commonly found in foods.

Peanut or soybean allergy: People who are allergic to peanuts, soybeans and other plants that are members of the Fabaceae/Leguminosea family might also be allergic to soybean oil.

Interactions

Interactions?

We currently have no information for SOYBEAN OIL Interactions.

Dosing

Dosing

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY MOUTH:

  • In the form of an enriched margarine, such as Take Control, a serving size is one tablespoon, or 14 grams.
  • For osteoarthritis: 300 mg soybean oil daily along with avocado oil.
APPLIED TO THE SKIN:
  • For preventing mosquito bites: 2% soybean oil products have been used. Directions on one commercial product (Bite Blocker) suggest reapplying every 2 hours.

View References

REFERENCES:

  • Jeevanandam, M., Young, D. H., Ramias, L., and Schiller, W. R. Effect of major trauma on plasma free amino acid concentrations in geriatric patients. Am.J.Clin.Nutr. 1990;51(6):1040-1045. View abstract.
  • Jiang, Q., Jiang, X. H., Zheng, M. H., and Chen, Y. P. L-Ornithine-l-aspartate in the management of hepatic encephalopathy: a meta-analysis. J.Gastroenterol.Hepatol. 2009;24(1):9-14. View abstract.
  • Kawada H. Clinical efficacy of ornithine aspartate for chronic liver injury accompanied by hyperammonemia: a double-blind study. The Japanese Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. 1979;56(4):1294-1306.
  • Public Health Agency of Canada. Canadian Recommendations for the Prevention and Treatment of Malaria Among International Travellers. Available at: http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/publicat/ccdr-rmtc/04vol30/30s1/page2_e.html (Accessed 24 May 2005).
  • Stuchlik M, Zak S. Lipid-based vehicle for oral drug delivery. Biomed Pap Med Fac Univ Palacky Olomouc Czech Repub 2001;145:17-26. View abstract.
  • Weststrate JA, Meijer GW. Plant sterol-enriched margarines and reduction of plasma total- and LDL-cholesterol concentrations in normocholesterolaemic and mildly hypercholesterolaemic subjects. Eur J Clin Nutr 1998;52:334-43. View abstract.

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CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version.
© Therapeutic Research Faculty 2018.