ACACIA

OTHER NAME(S):

Acacia arabica, Acacia senegal, Acacia verek, Arbre à Gomme Arabique, Bum Senegal, Bomme Arabique, Bomme de Senegal, Bummae Momosae, Goma Arábiga, Gomme Acacia, Gomme Arabique, Gomme d'Acacia, Gomme Sénégal, Gommier Blanc, Gum Acacia, Gum Arabic, Khadir, Kher, Kumatia, Mimosa senegal, Senegalia senegal.<br/><br/>

Overview

Overview Information

Acacia is the gum that is exuded from the acacia tree. It's a dietary fiber that can dissolve in water.

As a medicine, acacia is taken by mouth for high cholesterol, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and weight loss. It is also used to remove toxins from the body and as a prebiotic to promote "good" bacteria in the intestine.

Acacia is applied to the skin inside the mouth for plaque and gum inflammation (gingivitis). It is also applied to the skin to decrease skin inflammation (redness).

In manufacturing, acacia is used as a pharmaceutical ingredient in medications for throat or stomach inflammation and as a film-forming agent in peel-off skin masks.

Don't confuse acacia with acai, cassie absolute, or sweet acacia (Acacia farnesiana).

How does it work?

Acacia is a source of dietary fiber. It tends to make people feel full, so they might stop eating earlier than they otherwise would. This might lead to weight loss and reduced cholesterol levels.
Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Possibly Ineffective for

Insufficient Evidence for

  • Dental plaque. Early research shows that chewing acacia gum for 7 days reduces dental plaque more than chewing sugar-free gum. Other research shows that applying a gel containing acacia and other ingredients after brushing for 6 weeks can decrease plaque similarly to using chlorhexidine 1% gel.
  • Gum inflammation (gingivitis). Research shows that applying a gel containing acacia and other ingredients after brushing for 6 weeks can decrease gingivitis severity similarly to using chlorhexidine 1% gel.
  • Weight loss. There is early evidence that shows taking 30 grams of powdered acacia daily might help weight loss.
  • Skin irritation around colostomy appliances. Early research shows that applying a thick layer of acacia gel to the skin around a colostomy appliance decreases skin inflammation better than applying zinc sulfate ointment.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of acacia for these uses.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

Acacia is LIKELY SAFE for most adults when taken by mouth in amounts commonly found in food.

Acacia is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth in amounts used for medical purposes. Up to 30 grams daily has been used safely for 6 weeks. However, it can cause minor adverse effects, including gas, bloating, nausea, and loose stools.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of acacia during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Asthma: People with asthma might be sensitive to acacia pollen.

Cross-allergies: People with known allergies to other plants such as rye or quillaja bark might have a reaction to acacia.

Interactions

Interactions?

Major Interaction

Do not take this combination

!
  • Amoxicillin (Amoxil, Trimox) interacts with ACACIA

    Acacia can prevent the body from absorbing the antibiotic amoxicillin (Amoxil, Trimox). To prevent this interaction, take acacia at least four hours before or after taking amoxicillin (Amoxil, Trimox).

Dosing

Dosing

The appropriate dose of acacia depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for acacia. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

View References

REFERENCES:

  • Al Mustafa, Z. H. and Dafallah, A. A. A study on the toxicology of Acacia nilotica. Am J Chin Med 2000;28(1):123-129. View abstract.
  • Bener, A., Safa, W., Abdulhalik, S., and Lestringant, G. G. An analysis of skin prick test reactions in asthmatics in a hot climate and desert environment. Allerg.Immunol.(Paris) 2002;34(8):281-286. View abstract.
  • De Zotti, R. and Gubian, F. Asthma and rhinitis in wooding workers. Allergy Asthma Proc 1996;17(4):199-203. View abstract.
  • Final report of the safety assessment of Acacia catechu gum, Acacia concinna fruit extract, Acacia dealbata leaf extract, Acacia dealbata leaf wax, Acacia decurrens extract, Acacia farnesiana extract, Acacia farnesiana flower wax, Acacia farnesiana gum, Acacia senegal extract, Acacia senegal gum, and Acacia senegal gum extract. Int J Toxicol 2005;24 Suppl 3:75-118. View abstract.
  • Gazi, M. I. The finding of antiplaque features in Acacia Arabica type of chewing gum. J Clin Periodontol. 1991;18(1):75-77. View abstract.
  • Geller, M. and Rosario, N. A. Skin test sensitivity to Acacia pollen in Brazil. Ann.Allergy 1981;47(3):180-181. View abstract.
  • Liam, C. K., Loo, K. L., Wong, C. M., Lim, K. H., and Lee, T. C. Skin prick test reactivity to common aeroallergens in asthmatic patients with and without rhinitis. Respirology. 2002;7(4):345-350. View abstract.
  • Pumhirun, P., Towiwat, P., and Mahakit, P. Aeroallergen sensitivity of Thai patients with allergic rhinitis. Asian Pac.J Allergy Immunol. 1997;15(4):183-185. View abstract.
  • Raghuprasad, P. K., Brooks, S. M., Litwin, A., Edwards, J. J., Bernstein, I. L., and Gallagher, J. Quillaja bark (soapbark)--induced asthma. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1980;65(4):285-287. View abstract.
  • Sam, C. K., Kesavan, Padmaja, Liam, C. K., Soon, S. C., Lim, A. L., and Ong, E. K. A study of pollen prevalence in relation to pollen allergy in Malaysian asthmatics. Asian Pac.J Allergy Immunol. 1998;16(1):1-4. View abstract.
  • Suliaman, F. A., Holmes, W. F., Kwick, S., Khouri, F., and Ratard, R. Pattern of immediate type hypersensitivity reactions in the Eastern Province, Saudi Arabia. Ann.Allergy Asthma Immunol. 1997;78(4):415-418. View abstract.
  • Babiker R, Merghani TH, Elmusharaf K, et al. Effects of gum Arabic ingestion on body mass index and body fat percentage in healthy adult females: two-arm randomized, placebo controlled, double-blind trial. Nutr J 2012;11:111. View abstract.
  • Electronic Code of Federal Regulations. Title 21. Part 182 -- Substances Generally Recognized As Safe. Available at: https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?CFRPart=182
  • Eltayeb IB, Awad AI, Elderbi MA, Shadad SA. Effect of gum arabic on the absorption of a single oral dose of amoxicillin in healthy Sudanese volunteers. J Antimicrob Chemother 2004;54:577-8. View abstract.
  • Fotisch K, Fäh J, Wüthrich B, et al. IgE antibodies specific for carbohydrates in a patient allergic to gum arabic (Acacia senegal). Allergy. 1998 Nov;53(11):1043-51. View abstract.
  • Hosseinpour M, Fazeli A, Agabeigi M. Efficacy of Acacia senegal for stoma care in children with colostomy. Eur J Pediatr Surg. 2012 22(3):234-7. doi: 10.1055/s-0032-1308706. View abstract.
  • Howlett BJ, Hill DJ, Knox RB. Cross-reactivity between Acacia (wattle) and rye grass pollen allergens. Detection of allergens in Acacia (wattle) pollen. Clin Allergy. 1982 May;12(3):259-68. View abstract.
  • Jensen CD, Haskell W, Whittam JH. Long-term effects of water-soluble dietary fiber in the management of hypercholesterolemia in healthy men and women. Am J Cardiol 1997;79:34-7. View abstract.
  • Jensen CD, Spiller GA, Gates JE, et al. The effect of acacia gum and a water-soluble dietary fiber mixture on blood lipids in humans. J Am Coll Nutr 1993;12:147-54. View abstract.
  • Lust J. The herb book. New York, NY: Bantam Books, 1999.
  • Pradeep AR, Happy D, Garg G. Short-term clinical effects of commercially available gel containing Acacia arabica: a randomized controlled clinical trial. Aust Dent J. 2010 Mar;55(1):65-9. doi: 10.1111/j.1834-7819.2009.01180.x. View abstract.

More Resources for ACACIA

CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version. © Therapeutic Research Faculty 2009.