GARDEN CRESS

OTHER NAME(S):

Berro Hortelano, Cresson Alénois, Cresson de Jardin, Lepidio, Lepidium sativum, Mastuerzo.<br/><br/>

Overview

Overview Information

Garden cress is a plant. The parts that grow above the ground are used to make medicine.

People use garden cress for coughs, vitamin C deficiency, constipation, tendency toward infection (poor immune system), and fluid retention, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these uses.

How does it work?

Animal research suggests that garden cress might help fight some bacteria and viruses, but there isn't enough information to know if it works in humans.

Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Insufficient Evidence for

More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of garden cress for these uses.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

When taken by mouth: Garden cress is LIKELY SAFE when used as food. However, there isn't enough reliable information to know if garden cress is safe to take as medicine. Large amounts might cause irritation of the intestines.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There isn't enough reliable information to know if garden cress is safe to use as medicine when pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and stick with food amounts.

Diabetes: Garden cress might lower blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. Therefore, blood sugar levels need to be monitored closely. Dose adjustments may be necessary for diabetes medications that are taken.

Low potassium levels (hypokalemia): Garden cress might flush potassium out of the body, possibly leading to potassium levels that are too low. Until more is known, use garden cress with caution if you are at risk for potassium deficiency.

Low blood pressure (hypotension): Garden cress might lower blood pressure. There is some concern that garden cress might interfere with blood pressure control in people prone to low blood pressure.

Surgery: Garden cress might lower blood sugar levels. There is a concern that it could interfere with blood sugar control during and after surgical procedures. Stop taking garden cress at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Interactions

Interactions?

We currently have no information for GARDEN CRESS Interactions.

Dosing

Dosing

The appropriate dose of garden cress depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for garden cress. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

View References

REFERENCES:

  • Eddouks, M. and Maghrani, M. Effect of Lepidium sativum L. on renal glucose reabsorption and urinary TGF-beta 1 levels in diabetic rats. Phytother.Res 2008;22(1):1-5. View abstract.
  • Gokavi, S. S., Malleshi, N. G., and Guo, M. Chemical composition of garden cress (Lepidium sativum) seeds and its fractions and use of bran as a functional ingredient. Plant Foods Hum Nutr 2004;59(3):105-111. View abstract.
  • Kassie, F., Laky, B., Gminski, R., Mersch-Sundermann, V., Scharf, G., Lhoste, E., and Kansmuller, S. Effects of garden and water cress juices and their constituents, benzyl and phenethyl isothiocyanates, towards benzo(a)pyrene-induced DNA damage: a model study with the single cell gel electrophoresis/Hep G2 assay. Chem Biol Interact. 1-6-2003;142(3):285-296. View abstract.
  • Maghrani, M, Zeggwagh, NA, Michel, JB, and Eddouks, M. Antihypertensive effect of <it>Lepidium sativum</it> L. in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Journal of Ethnopharmacology (Ireland) 2005;100:193-197.
  • Mennicke, W. H., Gorler, K., Krumbiegel, G., Lorenz, D., and Rittmann, N. Studies on the metabolism and excretion of benzyl isothiocyanate in man. Xenobiotica 1988;18(4):441-447. View abstract.
  • Souri, E., Amin, G., Farsam, H., and Andaji, S. The antioxidant activity of some commonly used vegetables in Iranian diet. Fitoterapia 2004;75(6):585-588. View abstract.
  • Al-Jenoobi FI, Ahad A, Mahrous GM, Al-Mohizea AM, AlKharfy KM, Al-Suwayeh SA. Effects of fenugreek, garden cress, and black seed on theophylline pharmacokinetics in beagle dogs. Pharm Biol 2015;53(2):296-300. View abstract.

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CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version.
© Therapeutic Research Faculty 2018.