YUCCA

OTHER NAME(S):

Adam's Needle, Aloe Yucca, Arbre de Josué, Bear Grass, Dagger Plant, Joshua Tree, Mohave Yucca, Mojave Yucca, Our-Lord's-Candle, Soapweed, Spanish Bayonet, Yuca, Yucca aloifolia, Yucca angustifolia, Yucca arborescens, Yucca brevifolia, Yucca filamentosa, Yucca glauca, Yucca mohavensis, Yucca schidigera, Yucca whipplei.<br/><br/>

Overview

Overview Information

Yucca is the common name for the more than 40 species of plants in the Yucca genus. The root of the non-flowering plant is used to make medicine.

Yucca is used for osteoarthritis, high blood pressure, migraine headaches, inflammation of the intestine (colitis), high cholesterol, stomach disorders, diabetes, poor circulation, and liver and gallbladder disorders.

Some people apply yucca directly to the skin for sores, skin diseases, bleeding, sprains, joint pain, baldness, and dandruff.

In manufacturing, yucca extract is used as a foaming and flavoring agent in carbonated beverages. Many compounds from yucca have been used in the manufacture of new drugs.

How does it work?

Yucca contains chemicals that might help reduce high blood pressure and high cholesterol. It might also reduce arthritis symptoms such as pain, swelling, and stiffness.

Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Insufficient Evidence for

More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of yucca for these uses.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

Yucca is LIKELY SAFE when consumed in the amounts normally found in foods. Yucca is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth short-term. It can cause side effects such as stomach upset, bitter taste, nausea, and vomiting.

Not enough is known about the safety of taking yucca by mouth long-term or applying it to the skin.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking yucca if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Interactions

Interactions?

We currently have no information for YUCCA Interactions.

Dosing

Dosing

The appropriate dose of yucca depends on several factors such as the user’s age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for yucca. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

View References

REFERENCES:

  • Balestrieri, C., Felice, F., Piacente, S., Pizza, C., Montoro, P., Oleszek, W., Visciano, V., and Balestrieri, M. L. Relative effects of phenolic constituents from Yucca schidigera Roezl. bark on Kaposi's sarcoma cell proliferation, migration, and PAF synthesis. Biochem Pharmacol 5-14-2006;71(10):1479-1487. View abstract.
  • Favel, A., Kemertelidze, E., Benidze, M., Fallague, K., and Regli, P. Antifungal activity of steroidal glycosides from Yucca gloriosa L. Phytother.Res 2005;19(2):158-161. View abstract.
  • Hayashi, K., Nishino, H., Niwayama, S., Shiraki, K., and Hiramatsu, A. Yucca leaf protein (YLP) stops the protein synthesis in HSV-infected cells and inhibits virus replication. Antiviral Res 1992;17(4):323-333. View abstract.
  • Kim, S. W., Park, S. K., Kang, S. I., Kang, H. C., Oh, H. J., Bae, C. Y., and Bae, D. H. Hypocholesterolemic property of Yucca schidigera and Quillaja saponaria extracts in human body. Arch Pharm.Res 2003;26(12):1042-1046. View abstract.
  • Mahillon, V., Saussez, S., and Michel, O. High incidence of sensitization to ornamental plants in allergic rhinitis. Allergy 2006;61(9):1138-1140. View abstract.
  • Olas, B., Wachowicz, B., Majsterek, I., Blasiak, J., Stochmal, A., and Oleszek, W. Antioxidant properties of trans-3,3',5,5'-tetrahydroxy-4'-methoxystilbene against modification of variety of biomolecules in human blood cells treated with platinum compounds. Nutrition 2006;22(11-12):1202-1209. View abstract.
  • Poljacki, M., Paravina, M., Jovanovic, M., Subotic, M., and Duran, V. [Contact allergic dermatitis caused by plants]. Med Pregl. 1993;46(9-10):371-375. View abstract.
  • <p><span>Kanerva, L., Estlander, T., Petman, L., Makinen-Kiljunen, S. Occupational allergic contact urticaria to yucca (Yucca aloifolia), weeping fig (Ficus benjamina), and spathe flower (Spathiphyllum wallisii). Allergy. 2001;56(10): 1008-11.</span></p> View abstract.
  • Electronic Code of Federal Regulations. Title 21. Part 182 -- Substances Generally Recognized As Safe. Available at: https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?CFRPart=182
  • Tyler VE, Brady LR, Robbers JE. Pharmacognosy. 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Lea & Febiger, 1988.

More Resources for YUCCA

CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version.
© Therapeutic Research Faculty 2018.