EMU OIL

OTHER NAME(S):

Aceite de Emu, Bush Chook, Dromiceius Nova-hollandiae, Dromiceius novahollandiae, Émeu, Emu, Huile d'Émeu.<br/><br/>

Overview

Overview Information

The emu is a large, flightless bird, native to Australia. It is also farmed there as well as in the United States, Canada and Europe. Emu oil prepared from the fat of this bird and is used to make medicine.

People use emu oil for conditions such as high cholesterol, dry skin, wound healing, sore muscles, and other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these uses.

How does it work?

Emu oil contains chemicals called fatty acids. These chemicals might reduce pain and swelling (inflammation).

When emu oil is applied to the skin, it has moisturizing and cosmetic properties that resemble mineral oil.

Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Insufficient Evidence for

  • Joint pain caused by breast cancer drugs. Early research shows that applying emu oil reduces joint pain caused by drugs used to treat breast cancer. However, applying other oil that contains different ingredients also seems to work.
  • Skin damage due to radiation therapy. Early research shows that applying emu oil during and after radiation therapy doesn't prevent skin damage better than cottonseed oil.
  • Scaling rash, usually on the scalp and face (Seborrheic dermatitis). Applying emu oil to the skin might improve symptoms of seborrheic dermatitis. But it doesn't work as well as creams containing clotrimazole or hydrocortisone.
  • Burns.
  • Coughs.
  • Diabetic nerve pain.
  • Dry or wrinkled skin.
  • Hemorrhoids.
  • High cholesterol.
  • Insect bites.
  • Shingles.
  • Sore muscles.
  • Weight loss.
  • Wound healing.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of emu oil for these uses.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

Emu oil is possibly safe for most people when applied to the skin in appropriate amounts for up to 6 weeks. It is not known if emu oil is safe when taken by mouth.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of emu oil during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Interactions

Interactions?

We currently have no information for EMU OIL Interactions.

Dosing

Dosing

The appropriate dose of emu oil depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for emu oil. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

View References

REFERENCES:

  • Abimosleh SM, Tran CD, Howarth GS. Emu oil: a novel therapeutic for disorders of the gastrointestinal tract? J Gastroenterol Hepatol 2012;27(5):857-61. View abstract.
  • Afshar M, Ghaderi R, Zardast M, Delshad P. Effects of topical emu oil on burn wounds in the skin of Balb/c mice. Dermatol Res Pract 2016;2016:6419216. View abstract.
  • Attarzadeh Y, Asilian A, Shahmoradi Z, Adibi N. Comparing the efficacy of emu oil with clotrimazole and hydrocortisone in the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis: A clinical trial. J Res Med Sci 2013;18(6):477-81. View abstract.
  • Chan A, De Boer R, Gan A, et al. Randomized phase II placebo-controlled study to evaluate the efficacy of topical pure emu oil for joint pain related to adjuvant aromatase inhibitor use in postmenopausal women with early breast cancer: JUST (Joints Under Study). Support Care Cancer 2017;25(12):3785-91. View abstract.
  • Fukushima M, Ohashi T, Sekikawa M, Nakano M. Comparative hypocholesterolemic effects of five animal oils in cholesterol-fed rats. Biosci Biotechnol Biochem 1999;63:202-5. View abstract.
  • Jeengar MK, Kumar PS, Thummuri D, et al. Review on emu products for use as complementary and alternative medicine. Nutrition 2015;31(1):21-7. View abstract.
  • Kamalakkannan S, Tirupathi Pichiah PB, Kalaiselvi S, et al. Emu oil decreases atherogenic plaque formation in cafeteria diet-induced obese rats. J Sci Food Agric 2016;96(9):3063-8. View abstract.
  • Lindsay RJ, Geier MS, Yazbeck R, et al. Orally administered emu oil decreases acute inflammation and alters selected small intestinal parameters in a rat model of mucositis. Br J Nutr 2010;104(4):513-9. View abstract.
  • Lopez A, Sims DE, Ablett RF, et al. Effect of emu oil on auricular inflammation with croton oil in mice (abstract). Am J Vet Res 1999;60:1558-61. View abstract.
  • Politis MJ, Dmytrowich A. Promotion of second intention wound healing by emu oil lotion: comparative results with furasin, polysporin, and cortisone. Plast Reconstr Surg 1998;102:2404-7. View abstract.
  • Raghu Nadhanan R, Abimosleh SM, Su YW, et al. Dietary emu oil supplementation suppresses 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy-induced inflammation, osteoclast formation, and bone loss. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 2012;302(11):E1440-9. View abstract.
  • Rollmann DC, Novotny PJ, Petersen IA, et al. Double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study of processed ultra emu oil versus placebo in the prevention of radiation dermatitis. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2015;92(3):650-8. View abstract.
  • Vemu B, Selvasubramanian S, Pandiyan V. Emu oil offers protection in Crohn's disease model in rats. BMC Complement Altern Med 2016;16:55. View abstract.
  • Whitehouse MW, Turner AG, Davis KC, Roberts MS. Emu oil(s): a source of non-toxic transdermal anti-inflammatory agents in aboriginal medicine. Inflammopharmacol 1998;6(1):1-8. View abstract.
  • Zanardo V, Giarrizzo D, Maiolo L, Straface G. Efficacy of topical application of emu oil on areola skin barrier in breastfeeding women. J Evid Based Complementary Altern Med 2016;21(1):10-3. View abstract.
  • Zemtsov A, Gaddis M, Montalvo-Lugo VM, Zemstov A. Moisturizing and cosmetic properties of emu oil: a pilot double blind study. Australas J Dermatol 1996;37:159-61.

More Resources for EMU OIL

CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version.
© Therapeutic Research Faculty 2018.