SPEARMINT

OTHER NAME(S):

Curled Mint, Fish Mint, Garden Mint, Green Mint, Hierbabuena, Huile Essentielle de Menthe Verte, Lamb Mint, Mackerel Mint, Menta Verde, Mentha cordifolia, Mentha crispa, Mentha spicata, Mentha viridis, Menthe Verte, Menthe Crépue, Menthe Douce, Menthe à Épis, Menthe Frisée, Menthe des Jardins, Menthe Romaine, Native Spearmint, Oil of Spearmint, Our Lady's Mint, Pahari Pudina, Putiha, Sage of Bethlehem, Spearmint Essential Oil, Spire Mint, Yerba Buena, Yerbabuena.<br/><br/>

Overview

Overview Information

Spearmint is an herb. The leaves and oil are used to make medicine.

People use spearmint for conditions such as flatulence, indigestions, nausea, vomiting, and other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these uses.

How does it work?

The oil in spearmint contains chemicals that reduce inflammation (swelling) and change levels of chemicals called hormones, such as testosterone, in the body. Some chemicals might also harm cancer cells and kill bacteria.
Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Possibly Ineffective for

  • Memory. Chewing spearmint-flavored gum does not appear to improve memory in healthy adults.

Insufficient Evidence for

  • Male-pattern hair growth in women (hirsutism). Early research shows that drinking spearmint tea twice daily for up to one month can decrease levels of male sex hormone (testosterone) and increase levels of female sex hormone (estradiol) and other hormones in women with male-pattern hair growth. But it doesn't seem to greatly reduce the amount or location of male-pattern hair growth in women with this condition.
  • Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Early research shows that using 30 drops of a product containing lemon balm, spearmint, and coriander after meals for 8 weeks reduces stomach pain in people with IBS when taken along with the drug loperamide or psyllium.
  • Osteoarthritis. Early research shows that drinking spearmint tea reduces pain and stiffness by a small amount in people with knee osteoarthritis.
  • Nausea and vomiting after surgery. Use of aromatherapy with oils of ginger, spearmint, peppermint, and cardamom seems to reduce symptoms of nausea in people after surgery.
  • Cancer.
  • Colds.
  • Cramps.
  • Diarrhea.
  • Gas (flatulence).
  • Headaches.
  • Indigestion.
  • Muscle pain.
  • Skin conditions.
  • Sore throat.
  • Toothaches.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of spearmint for these uses.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

Spearmint and spearmint oil are LIKELY SAFE when eaten in amount commonly found in food. Spearmint is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth in medicinal amounts or when applied to the skin.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Spearmint is POSSIBLY UNSAFE when used in excessive amounts during pregnancy. Excessive use of spearmint tea might cause damage to the uterus. Avoid using in large amounts of spearmint during pregnancy.

There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking spearmint if you are breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid using in amounts greater than those found in food.

Kidney disorders: Spearmint tea might increase kidney damage. Higher amounts of spearmint tea seem to have greater effects. In theory, using large amounts of spearmint tea might make kidney disorders worse.

Liver disease: Spearmint tea might increase liver damage. Higher amounts of spearmint tea seem to have greater effects. In theory, using large amounts of spearmint tea might make worsen liver disease.

Interactions

Interactions?

We currently have no information for SPEARMINT Interactions.

Dosing

Dosing

The appropriate dose of spearmint depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for spearmint. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

View References

REFERENCES:

  • Abe, S., Maruyama, N., Hayama, K., Inouye, S., Oshima, H., and Yamaguchi, H. Suppression of neutrophil recruitment in mice by geranium essential oil. Mediators.Inflamm. 2004;13(1):21-24. View abstract.
  • Abe, S., Maruyama, N., Hayama, K., Ishibashi, H., Inoue, S., Oshima, H., and Yamaguchi, H. Suppression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced neutrophil adherence responses by essential oils. Mediators.Inflamm. 2003;12(6):323-328. View abstract.
  • Akdogan, M., Kilinc, I., Oncu, M., Karaoz, E., and Delibas, N. Investigation of biochemical and histopathological effects of Mentha piperita L. and Mentha spicata L. on kidney tissue in rats. Hum.Exp Toxicol. 2003;22(4):213-219. View abstract.
  • Akdogan, M., Tamer, M. N., Cure, E., Cure, M. C., Koroglu, B. K., and Delibas, N. Effect of spearmint (Mentha spicata Labiatae) teas on androgen levels in women with hirsutism. Phytother.Res 2007;21(5):444-447. View abstract.
  • Andersen, K. E. Contact allergy to toothpaste flavors. Contact Dermatitis 1978;4(4):195-198. View abstract.
  • Arumugam, P. Priya N. Subathra M. Ramesh A. Environmental Toxicology & Pharmacology 2008;26(1):92-95.
  • Baker, J. R., Bezance, J. B., Zellaby, E., and Aggleton, J. P. Chewing gum can produce context-dependent effects upon memory. Appetite 2004;43(2):207-210. View abstract.
  • Bonamonte, D., Mundo, L., Daddabbo, M., and Foti, C. Allergic contact dermatitis from Mentha spicata (spearmint). Contact Dermatitis 2001;45(5):298. View abstract.
  • Bulat, R., Fachnie, E., Chauhan, U., Chen, Y., and Tougas, G. Lack of effect of spearmint on lower oesophageal sphincter function and acid reflux in healthy volunteers. Aliment.Pharmacol Ther. 1999;13(6):805-812. View abstract.
  • Choudhury, R. P., Kumar, A., and Garg, A. N. Analysis of Indian mint (Mentha spicata) for essential, trace and toxic elements and its antioxidant behaviour. J Pharm Biomed.Anal. 6-7-2006;41(3):825-832. View abstract.
  • Clayton, R. and Orton, D. Contact allergy to spearmint oil in a patient with oral lichen planus. Contact Dermatitis 2004;51(5-6):314-315. View abstract.
  • Dal Sacco, D., Gibelli, D., and Gallo, R. Contact allergy in the burning mouth syndrome: a retrospective study on 38 patients. Acta Derm.Venereol. 2005;85(1):63-64. View abstract.
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  • Goncalves, J. C., Oliveira, Fde S., Benedito, R. B., de Sousa, D. P., de Almeida, R. N., and de Araujo, D. A. Antinociceptive activity of (-)-carvone: evidence of association with decreased peripheral nerve excitability. Biol Pharm Bull. 2008;31(5):1017-1020. View abstract.
  • Grant, P. Spearmint herbal tea has significant anti-androgen effects in polycystic ovarian syndrome. A randomized controlled trial. Phytother.Res 2010;24(2):186-188. View abstract.
  • Guney, M., Oral, B., Karahanli, N., Mungan, T., and Akdogan, M. The effect of Mentha spicata Labiatae on uterine tissue in rats. Toxicol.Ind.Health 2006;22(8):343-348. View abstract.
  • Imai, H., Osawa, K., Yasuda, H., Hamashima, H., Arai, T., and Sasatsu, M. Inhibition by the essential oils of peppermint and spearmint of the growth of pathogenic bacteria. Microbios 2001;106 Suppl 1:31-39. View abstract.
  • Johnson, A. J. and Miles, C. Chewing gum and context-dependent memory: the independent roles of chewing gum and mint flavour. Br.J Psychol. 2008;99(Pt 2):293-306. View abstract.
  • Johnson, A. J. and Miles, C. Evidence against memorial facilitation and context-dependent memory effects through the chewing of gum. Appetite 2007;48(3):394-396. View abstract.
  • Kumar, V., Kural, M. R., Pereira, B. M., and Roy, P. Spearmint induced hypothalamic oxidative stress and testicular anti-androgenicity in male rats - altered levels of gene expression, enzymes and hormones. Food Chem Toxicol. 2008;46(12):3563-3570. View abstract.
  • Larsen, W., Nakayama, H., Fischer, T., Elsner, P., Frosch, P., Burrows, D., Jordan, W., Shaw, S., Wilkinson, J., Marks, J., Jr., Sugawara, M., Nethercott, M., and Nethercott, J. Fragrance contact dermatitis: a worldwide multicenter investigation (Part II). Contact Dermatitis 2001;44(6):344-346. View abstract.
  • Masumoto, Y., Morinushi, T., Kawasaki, H., Ogura, T., and Takigawa, M. Effects of three principal constituents in chewing gum on electroencephalographic activity. Psychiatry Clin.Neurosci. 1999;53(1):17-23. View abstract.
  • Miles, C. and Johnson, A. J. Chewing gum and context-dependent memory effects: a re-examination. Appetite 2007;48(2):154-158. View abstract.
  • Ormerod, A. D. and Main, R. A. Sensitisation to "sensitive teeth" toothpaste. Contact Dermatitis 1985;13(3):192-193. View abstract.
  • Poon, T. S. and Freeman, S. Cheilitis caused by contact allergy to anethole in spearmint flavoured toothpaste. Australas.J Dermatol. 2006;47(4):300-301. View abstract.
  • Pratap, S, Mithravinda, Mohan, YS, Rajoshi, C, and Reddy, PM. Antimicrobial activity and bioautography of essential oils from selected Indian medicinal plants (MAPS-P-410). International Pharmaceutical Federation World Congress 2002;62:133.
  • Rafii, F. and Shahverdi, A. R. Comparison of essential oils from three plants for enhancement of antimicrobial activity of nitrofurantoin against enterobacteria. Chemotherapy 2007;53(1):21-25. View abstract.
  • Rasooli, I., Shayegh, S., and Astaneh, S. The effect of Mentha spicata and Eucalyptus camaldulensis essential oils on dental biofilm. Int J Dent.Hyg. 2009;7(3):196-203. View abstract.
  • Saleem, M., Alam, A., and Sultana, S. Attenuation of benzoyl peroxide-mediated cutaneous oxidative stress and hyperproliferative response by the prophylactic treatment of mice with spearmint (Mentha spicata). Food Chem Toxicol. 2000;38(10):939-948. View abstract.
  • Skrebova, N., Brocks, K., and Karlsmark, T. Allergic contact cheilitis from spearmint oil. Contact Dermatitis 1998;39(1):35. View abstract.
  • Sokovic, M. D., Vukojevic, J., Marin, P. D., Brkic, D. D., Vajs, V., and van Griensven, L. J. Chemical composition of essential oils of Thymus and Mentha species and their antifungal activities. Molecules. 2009;14(1):238-249. View abstract.
  • Soliman, K. M. and Badeaa, R. I. Effect of oil extracted from some medicinal plants on different mycotoxigenic fungi. Food Chem.Toxicol 2002;40(11):1669-1675. View abstract.
  • Tomson, N., Murdoch, S., and Finch, T. M. The dangers of making mint sauce. Contact Dermatitis 2004;51(2):92-93. View abstract.
  • Torney, L. K., Johnson, A. J., and Miles, C. Chewing gum and impasse-induced self-reported stress. Appetite 2009;53(3):414-417. View abstract.
  • Tucha, O., Mecklinger, L., Maier, K., Hammerl, M., and Lange, K. W. Chewing gum differentially affects aspects of attention in healthy subjects. Appetite 2004;42(3):327-329. View abstract.
  • Wilkinson, L., Scholey, A., and Wesnes, K. Chewing gum selectively improves aspects of memory in healthy volunteers. Appetite 2002;38(3):235-236. View abstract.
  • Yoney, A., Prieto, J. M., Lardos, A., and Heinrich, M. Ethnopharmacy of Turkish-speaking Cypriots in Greater London. Phytother.Res 2010;24(5):731-740. View abstract.
  • Yu, T. W., Xu, M., and Dashwood, R. H. Antimutagenic activity of spearmint. Environ Mol.Mutagen. 2004;44(5):387-393. View abstract.
  • Zhao, C. Z., Wang, Y., Tang, F. D., Zhao, X. J., Xu, Q. P., Xia, J. F., and Zhu, Y. F. [Effect of Spearmint oil on inflammation, oxidative alteration and Nrf2 expression in lung tissue of COPD rats]. Zhejiang.Da.Xue.Xue.Bao.Yi.Xue.Ban. 2008;37(4):357-363. View abstract.
  • Akdogan M, Ozguner M, Aydin G, Gokalp O. Investigation of biochemical and histopathological effects of Mentha piperita Labiatae and Mentha spicata Labiatae on liver tissue in rats. Hum Exp Toxicol 2004;23:21-8. View abstract.
  • Akdogan M, Ozguner M, Kocak A, et al. Effects of peppermint teas on plasma testosterone, follicle-stimulating hormone, and luteinizing hormone levels and testicular tissue in rats. Urology 2004;64:394-8. View abstract.
  • Connelly AE, Tucker AJ, Tulk H, et al. High-rosmarinic acid spearmint tea in the management of knee osteoarthritis symptoms. J Med Food 2014;17:1361-7. View abstract.
  • Damiani E, Aloia AM, Priore MG, et al. Allergy to mint (Mentha spicata). J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol 2012;22:309-10. View abstract.
  • Electronic Code of Federal Regulations. Title 21. Part 182 -- Substances Generally Recognized As Safe. Available at: https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?CFRPart=182
  • Gunatheesan S, Tam MM, Tate B, et al. Retrospective study of oral lichen planus and allergy to spearmint oil. Australas J Dermatol 2012;53:224-8. View abstract.
  • Hunt R, Dienemann J, Norton HJ, Hartley W, Hudgens A, Stern T, Divine G. Aromatherapy as treatment for postoperative nausea: a randomized trial. Anesth Analg 2013;117(3):597-604. View abstract.
  • Lasrado JA, Nieman KM, Fonseca BA, et al. Safety and tolerability of a dried aqueous spearmint extract. Regul Toxicol Pharmacol 2017;86:167-176. View abstract.
  • Vejdani R, Shalmani HR, Mir-Fattahi M, et al. The efficacy of an herbal medicine, Carmint, on the relief of abdominal pain and bloating in patients with irritable bowel syndrome: a pilot study. Dig Dis Sci. 2006 Aug;51:1501-7. View abstract.

More Resources for SPEARMINT

CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version. © Therapeutic Research Faculty 2009.