TRYPSIN

OTHER NAME(S):

Enzyme Protéolytique, Proteinase, Protéinase, Proteolytic Enzyme, Tripsin, Tripsina, Trypsine.<br/><br/>

Overview

Overview Information

Trypsin is an enzyme that aids with digestion. An enzyme is a protein that speeds up a certain biochemical reaction. Trypsin is found in the small intestine. It can also be made from fungus, plants, and bacteria. But it is usually made for commercial purposes from the pancreas of livestock.

Trypsin is given to people who lack enzymes needed for digestion.

It is also given in combination with bromelain and rutin for treatment of osteoarthritis and many other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these other uses.

Some people apply trypsin directly to wounds and ulcers to remove dead tissue and improve healing.

How does it work?

Trypsin removes dead skin cells (tissue) and allows healthy tissue to grow. Trypsin in combination with other enzymes seems to reduce inflammation and swelling.

Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Insufficient Evidence for

  • Airway infections caused by exercise.
  • Colon cancer, rectal cancer.
  • Diabetes.
  • Improving digestion.
  • Infections of the kidney, bladder, or urethra (urinary tract infections or UTIs).
  • Multiple sclerosis (MS).
  • Muscle soreness caused by exercise.
  • Osteoarthritis.
  • Skin damage caused by radiation therapy (radiation dermatitis).
  • Sprains.
  • Swelling after surgery.
  • Wound healing.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of trypsin for these uses.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

When applied to the skin: Trypsin is POSSIBLY SAFE when used by healthcare professionals for wound cleaning and healing. It can cause side effects such as pain and burning.

When taken by mouth: Not enough is known about the safety of trypsin for its other uses. Trypsin has been used in combination with other enzymes in clinical studies with no reports of serious adverse effects. But it is not known if trypsin taken by mouth as a single-ingredient is safe.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of trypsin during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Interactions

Interactions?

We currently have no information for TRYPSIN Interactions.

Dosing

Dosing

The appropriate dose of trypsin depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time, there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for trypsin. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

View References

REFERENCES:

  • Dale, P. S., Tamhankar, C. P., George, D., and Daftary, G. V. Co-medication with hydrolytic enzymes in radiation therapy of uterine cervix: evidence of the reduction of acute side effects. Cancer Chemother.Pharmacol 2001;47 Suppl:S29-S34. View abstract.
  • Ito, C., Yamaguchi, K., Shibutani, Y., Suzuki, K., Yamazaki, Y., Komachi, H., Ohnishi, H., and Fujimura, H. [Anti-inflammatory actions of proteases, bromelain, trypsin and their mixed preparation (author's transl)]. Nippon Yakurigaku Zasshi 4-20-1979;75(3):227-237. View abstract.
  • Klein, G., Kullich, W., Schnitker, J., and Schwann, H. Efficacy and tolerance of an oral enzyme combination in painful osteoarthritis of the hip. A double-blind, randomised study comparing oral enzymes with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Clin Exp Rheumatol. 2006;24(1):25-30. View abstract.
  • Martin, T., Uhder, K., Kurek, R., Roeddiger, S., Schneider, L., Vogt, H. G., Heyd, R., and Zamboglou, N. Does prophylactic treatment with proteolytic enzymes reduce acute toxicity of adjuvant pelvic irradiation? Results of a double-blind randomized trial. Radiother.Oncol. 2002;65(1):17-22. View abstract.
  • Miller, P. C., Bailey, S. P., Barnes, M. E., Derr, S. J., and Hall, E. E. The effects of protease supplementation on skeletal muscle function and DOMS following downhill running. J Sports Sci 2004;22(4):365-372. View abstract.
  • Akhtar NM, Naseer R, Farooqi AZ, Aziz W, Nazir M. Oral enzyme combination versus diclofenac in the treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee--a double-blind prospective randomized study. Clin Rheumatol. 2004;23(5):410-5. View abstract.
  • Baumhackl U, Kappos L, Radue EW, et al. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of oral hydrolytic enzymes in relapsing multiple sclerosis. Mult Scler. 2005;11(2):166-8. View abstract.
  • Bolten WW, Glade MJ, Raum S, Ritz BW. The safety and efficacy of an enzyme combination in managing knee osteoarthritis pain in adults: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Arthritis 2015;2015:251521. View abstract.
  • Burnham TH, ed. Drug Facts and Comparisons, Updated Monthly. Facts and Comparisons, St. Louis, MO.
  • Cediel G, Olivares M, Gaitán D, Flores S, Brito A, Pizarro F. Effect of trypsin and mucin on heme iron bioavailability in humans. Biol Trace Elem Res. 2012;150(1-3):37-41. View abstract.
  • Comparison of Chronic Wound Care Products. Pharmacist's Letter/Prescriber's Letter 2008;12(3):1203.
  • Grabs V, Kersten A, Haller B, et al. Rutoside and hydrolytic enzymes do not attenuate marathon-induced inflammation. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2017;49(3):387-395. View abstract.
  • Gujral MS, Patnaik PM, Kaul R, et al. Efficacy of hydrolytic enzymes in preventing radiation therapy-induced side effects in patients with head and neck cancers. Cancer Chemother Pharmacol. 2001;47 Suppl:S23-8. View abstract.
  • Hellgren L, Vincent J. Degradation and liquefication effect of streptokinase-streptodornase and stabilised trypsin on tissue necroses, crusts of fibrinoid, purulent exudate and clotted blood from leg ulcers. J Int Med Res 1977;5:334-7. View abstract.
  • Kempf K, Manzo G, Hanifi-Moghaddam P, et al. Effect of combined oral proteases and flavonoid treatment in subjects at risk of Type 1 diabetes. Diabet Med. 2009;26(12):1309-10. View abstract.
  • Kerkhoffs GM, Struijs PA, de Wit C, Rahlfs VW, Zwipp H, van Dijk CN. A double blind, randomised, parallel group study on the efficacy and safety of treating acute lateral ankle sprain with oral hydrolytic enzymes. Br J Sports Med. 2004;38(4):431-5. View abstract.
  • Klein G, Kullich W. Short-term treatment of painful osteoarthritis of the knee with oral enzymes. Clin Drug Invest 2000;19:15-23.
  • Latha B, Ramakrishnan M, Jayaraman V, Babu M. Serum enzymatic changes modulated using trypsin: chymotrypsin preparation during burn wounds in humans. Burns 1997;23:560-4. View abstract.
  • Latha B, Ramakrishnan M, Jayaraman V, Babu M. The efficacy of trypsin: chymotrypsin preparation in the reduction of oxidative damage during burn injury. Burns 1998;24:532-8. View abstract.
  • Popiela T, Kulig J, Klek S, Wachol D, Bock PR, Hanisch J. Double-blind pilot-study on the efficacy of enzyme therapy in advanced colorectal cancer. Przegl Lek. 2000;57 Suppl 5:142. View abstract.
  • RaviKumar T, Ramakrishnan M, Jayaraman V, Babu M. Effect of trypsin-chymotrypsin (Chymoral Forte D.S.) preparation on the modulation of cytokine levels in burn patients. Burns. 2001;27(7):709-16. View abstract.
  • Shetty V, Mohan A. A prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial comparing the efficacy of systemic enzyme therapy for edema control in orthognathic surgery using ultrasound scan to measure facial swelling. J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2013;71(7):1261-7. View abstract.
  • Spraycar M, ed. Stedman's Medical Dictionary. 26th ed. Baltimore, MD: Williams & Wilkins, 1995.
  • Suomalainen O. Evaluation of two enzyme preparations-Trypure and Varidase in traumatic ulcers. Ann Chir Gynaecol 1983;72:62-5. View abstract.
  • Tilwe GH, Beria S, Turakhia NH, Daftary GV, Schiess W. Efficacy and tolerability of oral enzyme therapy as compared to diclofenac in active osteoarthrosis of knee joint: an open randomized controlled clinical trial. J Assoc Physicians India. 2001;49:617-21. View abstract.
  • US Department of Justice. U.S. Files Complaint Against Texas-Based Healthpoint Ltd. Under the False Claims Act. https://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/us-files-complaint-against-texas-based-healthpoint-ltd-under-false-claims-act. (Accessed June 19, 2019).

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CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version.
© Therapeutic Research Faculty 2018.