TRYPSIN

OTHER NAME(S):

Enzyme Protéolytique, Proteinase, Protéinase, Proteolytic Enzyme, Tripsin, Tripsina, Trypsine.<br/><br/>

Overview

Overview Information

Trypsin is an enzyme. An enzyme is a protein that speeds up a certain biochemical reaction. Trypsin is found in the small intestine. It can also be made from fungus, plants, and bacteria. But it is usually made for commercial purposes from the pancreas of livestock.

Trypsin is given to people who lack enzymes needed for digestion.

It is also given in combination with bromelain and rutin for treatment of osteoarthritis.

Some people apply trypsin directly to wounds and ulcers to remove dead tissue and improve healing.

There is also a combination prescription spray-on product that is used for healing mouth ulcers. It contains trypsin, Peru balsam, and castor oil.

How does it work?

Trypsin removes dead skin cells (tissue) and allows healthy tissue to grow.

Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Possibly Effective for

  • Osteoarthritis. A combination product that contains trypsin, bromelain, and rutin (Phlogenzym) seems to work about as well as a medication called diclofenac in relieving pain and improving knee function.
  • Wound cleansing and healing. Applying trypsin to the skin seems to help remove dead tissue from wounds and improve healing. A combination spray-on (aerosol) product containing trypsin, Peru balsam, and castor oil is an FDA-approved prescription product.

Insufficient Evidence for

  • Improving digestion.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of trypsin for these uses.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

Trypsin seems to be safe when used by healthcare professionals for wound cleaning and healing. It can cause side effects such as pain and burning.

Not enough is known about the safety of trypsin for its other uses.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of trypsin during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Interactions

Interactions?

We currently have no information for TRYPSIN Interactions.

Dosing

Dosing

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY MOUTH:

  • For osteoarthritis: two tablets of a combination product (Phlogenzym) which contains 100 mg of rutin, 48 mg of trypsin, and 90 mg of bromelain three times daily.
APPLIED TO THE SKIN:

View References

REFERENCES:

  • Burnham TH, ed. Drug Facts and Comparisons, Updated Monthly. Facts and Comparisons, St. Louis, MO.
  • Hellgren L, Vincent J. Degradation and liquefication effect of streptokinase-streptodornase and stabilised trypsin on tissue necroses, crusts of fibrinoid, purulent exudate and clotted blood from leg ulcers. J Int Med Res 1977;5:334-7. View abstract.
  • Klein G, Kullich W. Short-term treatment of painful osteoarthritis of the knee with oral enzymes. Clin Drug Invest 2000;19:15-23.
  • Latha B, Ramakrishnan M, Jayaraman V, Babu M. Serum enzymatic changes modulated using trypsin: chymotrypsin preparation during burn wounds in humans. Burns 1997;23:560-4. View abstract.
  • Latha B, Ramakrishnan M, Jayaraman V, Babu M. The efficacy of trypsin: chymotrypsin preparation in the reduction of oxidative damage during burn injury. Burns 1998;24:532-8. View abstract.
  • Spraycar M, ed. Stedman's Medical Dictionary. 26th ed. Baltimore, MD: Williams & Wilkins, 1995.
  • Suomalainen O. Evaluation of two enzyme preparations-Trypure and Varidase in traumatic ulcers. Ann Chir Gynaecol 1983;72:62-5. View abstract.

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CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version.
© Therapeutic Research Faculty 2018.