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Vision Problems: Living With Poor Eyesight

You don't see as well as you used to. Eye problems such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), glaucoma, cataracts, or diabetic retinopathy may be making it hard to work and manage many of your daily activities. But don't give up. There are lots of things you can do to adapt to low vision and make your life easier and safer.

  • You can adapt your home by making changes to lighting, using contrast in objects that you use often and in structures such as door frames and light switches, labeling and marking medicines and food, and getting rid of potential hazards.
  • If you wear glasses, keeping your lens prescription current can help you adapt to your vision problems.
  • Visual aids and adaptive technologies can help you work, communicate, and travel. These include magnifying lenses, special video cameras to enlarge pictures or print, large-print books and newspapers, and adaptive appliances.
  • Counseling, rehabilitation, and training can help you with managing your household, cooking, shopping, personal grooming, and other aspects of daily home and work life.
  • If your low vision prevents you from driving, you can explore other ways to get around, such as riding with family and friends, using public transportation, or taking taxis. You can also see if your area offers low-cost bus or taxi service for people who have low vision.
  • Building a personal support network can help you keep or improve your quality of life and cope with your vision problems.

To keep doing the things you enjoy, you will want to make a few changes to your lifestyle. The changes you need to make depend on how much vision you have lost, what kinds of activities you like to do, and your current lifestyle. Making changes may seem difficult and time-consuming, but be patient. You can keep your independence and continue the activities you enjoy.

what.gif What do I do first?
why.gif Why is it important to be able to adapt to my vision?
how.gif How can I adapt to my poor eyesight?
where.gif Where to get more information

More information about vision problems can be found in these topics:

Up Next in This Action Set:
ByHealthwise Staff
Primary Medical ReviewerKathleen Romito, MD - Family Medicine
Specialist Medical ReviewerChristopher J. Rudnisky, MD, MPH, FRCSC - Ophthalmology
Last RevisedNovember 12, 2012

WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: November 12, 2012
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.

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