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Meet the Maker's Diet

A new diet program takes its roots from the Bible and focuses on organic food.

Nutritionists Sound Off continued...

She adds that in the distant past, people were unaware of vitamins. "We have come a long way in terms of our knowledge, and I don't think that should be ignored," she says.

"One of the things [Rubin] said is that our ancestors enjoyed exceptional health, but I don't know how he knows that from the Bible," she says.

Still, Kava says certain things in the Maker's Diet are reasonable -- healthful even. "It's a mixed bag," she says. "He picked up on a lot of the faddy, crazy things about modern lifestyles [such as danger from electromagnetic fields and avoiding fluoride in the water supply], but hand washing is important and reasonable."

Victoria Shanta-Retelny, RD, a dietitian at Northwestern Memorial Hospital's Wellness Institute in Chicago, is less laudatory about the new, old diet. "The basic premise of The Maker's Diet, which is a '40-day health experience that will change your life forever,' begs skepticism," she tells WebMD.

"The plan is gimmicky as it focuses on fasting one day per week, which I don't recommend as a general guideline because we are not sure [what] a person's specific health concerns are, such as diabetes," she says. 

What's more, there are a myriad of supplements that the diet touts as essential, she says.

"One of them, extra-virgin coconut oil, is marketed as the 'healthier oil' when the nutrition literature does not support this," she says. If anything, she says, "coconut oil is 92% saturated fat -- the type that can clog arteries."

Shanta-Retelny says the supplements and cleansing agents are not necessary if you are eating a healthy diet (and not eliminating food groups that are high in fiber, vitamins, and minerals).

So is there any population that may benefit from the Maker's Diet?

"Since this diet is based (in part) on kosher practices, it may be better for a strict Orthodox Jewish population, who may practice holistic living, but I would not recommend it to the general population," she says.

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