Find Information About:

Drugs & Supplements

Get information and reviews on prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications, vitamins, and supplements. Search by name or medical condition.

Pill Identifier

Pill Identifier

Having trouble identifying your pills?

Enter the shape, color, or imprint of your prescription or OTC drug. Our pill identification tool will display pictures that you can compare to your pill.

Get Started

My Medicine

Save your medicine, check interactions, sign up for FDA alerts, create family profiles and more.

Get Started

WebMD Health Experts and Community

Talk to health experts and other people like you in WebMD's Communities. It's a safe forum where you can create or participate in support groups and discussions about health topics that interest you.

  • Second Opinion

    Second Opinion

    Read expert perspectives on popular health topics.

  • Community


    Connect with people like you, and get expert guidance on living a healthy life.

Got a health question? Get answers provided by leading organizations, doctors, and experts.

Get Answers

Sign up to receive WebMD's award-winning content delivered to your inbox.

Sign Up

Get on a Regular Eating Schedule

Though you may not take in the target number of daily calories at first, you should eat three meals a day and snack in between and after dinner, no matter what.

"I recommend eating six times per day and eating about every three hours," says Nancy Farrell, a dietitian in Fredericksburg, VA. "A snack is 100 to 200 calories, and a meal starts at 500 calories."

Make sure that your snacks are small enough that you'll be able to eat again at your next mealtime.

"Stay away from snacks that are going to fill you up too much," Larson says. "If you're having a smoothie, for example, make it small, like 8 ounces. Not 12 to 16 ounces like we see at smoothie shops."

Choose Low-Volume, High-Calorie Foods

Eat foods that pack a lot of calories -- and nutrients of course -- into a small space. Dietitians call these "calorie-dense." That way you can get the calories you need without filling up too fast.

Some choices that can get the job done:

Nuts. They're high in fiber and protein and have about 150 to 200 calories per ounce. Seeds, such as sunflower and pumpkin, also cram a lot of calories into a few bites. They make a great snack. Sprinkle them on salads, oatmeal, soup, and anywhere else you can.

Nut butters. A tablespoon of peanut butter has about 100 calories. You can also try a spread that's made from almonds.

Dried fruit. You can get 147 calories from an ounce of banana chips. Don't forget raisins, prunes, craisins, dates, and figs, too. Snack on them and toss them into salads and cereal.

Fresh, dense fruits. Some good choices are mangos and avocados.

A medium-sized mango has 130 calories. Avocados can have more than 300 calories, depending on size and type.

"I incorporated a lot of avocados and other healthy fats into my diet when I was trying to gain weight," says Amber Dumler, a museum specialist in Washington, D.C. Already petite, she lost about 12 pounds when she was breastfeeding her first child. She struggled to put the weight back on and keep it on.

Healthy Recipe Finder

Browse our collection of healthy, delicious recipes, from WebMD and Eating Well magazine.

Top searches: Chicken, Chocolate, Salad, Desserts, Soup

Heart Rate Calculator

Ensure you're exercising hard enough to get a good workout, but not strain your heart.

While you are exercising, you should count between...