Skip to content

If you're getting ready to have weight loss surgery, you're probably looking ahead to the results.

You can expect to lose a lot of weight. If you have a weight-related medical condition, like type 2 diabetes or sleep apnea, those conditions may improve. And almost all people who get weight loss surgery -- 95% -- say their quality of life improves, too.

You'll want to get ready for the recovery and know what you'll need to do to make the changes last.

How Much Weight Will You Lose?

Ask your doctor exactly what you can expect. It may depend, in part, on what you weigh now and the type of surgery you get.

Gastric banding or sleeve gastrectomy is quickly becoming the preferred surgical procedure. People who get this operation lose about 40% to 50% of extra weight, on average.

On average, people lose 60% of their extra weight after gastric bypass surgery.

What Will the Recovery Be Like?

Most gastric bypass surgery is laparoscopic, which means the surgeon makes small cuts. That makes for shorter recovery time.

Most people stay in the hospital 2 to 3 days, and get back to normal activities in 3 to 5 weeks.

If the surgery must be "open," meaning the surgeon has to make a larger cut, healing takes longer.

What Are the Possible Side Effects?

Most people experience no serious problems after weight loss surgery. Only about 10% have minor complications. Less than 5% have serious complications. If you do have any problems that concern you, check in with your doctor.

Some common side effects include:

  • Constipation is common after weight loss surgery. Your doctor can let you know how to handle it. Avoid granular fiber (Metamucil or psyllium), which can cause obstructions.
  • Dumping syndrome happens after eating high-sugar meals after weight loss surgery. Sodas or fruit juices are often to blame. The sugary food rushes through the stomach and can cause nausea, vomiting, and weakness.
  • Gallstones are common when you lose a lot of weight quickly. Up to 50% of patients will develop gallstones after gastric bypass surgery, and these are usually harmless. Sometimes, gallstones can cause nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. About 15% to 25% of people need surgery to remove their gallbladder after gastric bypass surgery.
  • Wound infections can happen up to 3 weeks after surgery. Symptoms include redness and warmth, pain, or thick drainage (pus) from the surgical wound. Wound infections require antibiotics and sometimes further surgery.

Healthy Recipe Finder

Browse our collection of healthy, delicious recipes, from WebMD and Eating Well magazine.

Top searches: Chicken, Chocolate, Salad, Desserts, Soup

Heart Rate Calculator

Ensure you're exercising hard enough to get a good workout, but not strain your heart.

While you are exercising, you should count between...

-
Beats
PER
Seconds