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How Estrogen May Help Prevent UTIs After Menopause

Laboratory study suggests vaginal supplementation would benefit some women
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WebMD News from HealthDay

By Serena Gordon

HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, June 20 (HealthDay News) -- Estrogen treatment delivered vaginally may help prevent repeat urinary tract infections in postmenopausal women, new laboratory research suggests.

Urinary tract infections are common among women, with one-quarter experiencing recurring infections. And age-related changes increase the likelihood of these infections developing after menopause, when estrogen production plummets.

Until now, taking antibiotics prophylactically -- to ward off recurrent urinary tract infections -- has been the gold standard for these women, said Thomas Hannan, a research instructor in pathology and immunology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. "But antibiotic resistance is increasing, and some women are resistant to everything we have," Hannan said. "We need other options. We need non-antibiotic options."

This study, published in the June 19 issue of the journal Science Translational Medicine, "suggests a more holistic approach by changing the way women respond to bacteria," said Hannan, co-author of an editorial accompanying the study in the journal.

The results support the use of vaginal estrogen as a preventive measure for postmenopausal women with recurrent urinary tract infections, he wrote in the editorial.

Working in the laboratory and with animal models, the researchers identified a number of ways that estrogen -- the female sex hormone -- helps keep recurrent urinary tract infections at bay.

"This study presents some underlying mechanisms for the beneficial effect of [topical estrogen formulations] after menopause and supports the application of estrogen in postmenopausal women suffering from recurrent UTIs," wrote the study's authors, from the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden.

About half of all women will experience at least one urinary tract infection in their lifetime, according to the study. For about 25 percent of these women, the infection will come back again within six months.

Low estrogen levels have previously been linked to recurrent infections, and the new study sought to identify exactly how estrogen might affect a woman's risk of recurrent urinary tract infections.

For the study, the researchers used human cells from postmenopausal women who had used supplemental vaginal estrogen for two weeks. They also worked with mice that were given bacteria that would cause urinary tract infections like those in humans.

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