Skip to content

Birth Control Health Center

Font Size
A
A
A

Emergency Contraception FAQ

Who needs emergency contraception?

If you had unprotected sex and don't want to get pregnant right now, you may want emergency contraception. Like other forms of birth control, emergency contraception stops you from getting pregnant. The difference is that you can take it after you had sex. Emergency contraception pills are different from drugs used to end a pregnancy.

Emergency contraception works well, but it's not a substitute for regular birth control. Regular birth control works better, has fewer side effects, and costs less. As the name suggests, emergency birth control is only for emergencies, not something to use all the time.

Recommended Related to Birth Control

Emergency Contraception Questions for Your Doctor

If you're thinking about using emergency contraception, ask your doctor or pharmacist these questions.

Read the Emergency Contraception Questions for Your Doctor article > >

What are my options?

Most types are pills. Examples include Ella (ulipristal acetate) and Plan B One-Step (levonorgestrel.) You can also buy generic levonorgestrel pills, like My Way and Next Choice One Dose.

An IUD -- a small device that a doctor inserts into the uterus -- also works as emergency contraception.

Research shows that Plan B One-Step starts to lose its effectiveness in women heavier than 165 pounds and is not recommend for anyone over this weight. Instead, a copper-releasing IUD

is the suggested option for emergency contraception in this group.

How long after having sex will emergency contraception still work?

That depends. Plan B One-Step and generic levonorgestrel work best if you take them within 3 days after sex, but they may work up to 5 days after sex. Ella and the IUD can work up to 5 days after sex. However, those are only averages. What really matters is where you are in your cycle. If you have sex when you're fertile, waiting several days to take emergency contraception could be too late. That's why experts say you should use it as soon as possible after having sex.

Where can I get it?

Emergency contraception is available at drugstores, health departments, women's health centers, and hospitals. Depending on your age, you don’t need a prescription for most brands. You do need a prescription for Ella and some other types.

Can anyone buy over-the-counter emergency contraception pills?

In 2013, the FDA allowed pharmacies to sell one brand, Plan B One-Step, without a prescription, over-the-counter, without any age restrictions. But not all pharmacies are selling it that way yet.

Other types of over-the-counter emergency contraception, like My Way and Next Choice One Dose, have age restrictions. You need to have ID showing that you're 17 or older. If you're 16 or younger, you need a prescription.

1 | 2 | 3

Today on WebMD

IUD
Here's what to expect.
man opening condom wrapper
Do you know the right way to use them?
 
birth control pills
Here's what to do next.
doctor and patient
His and her options.
 
Forgot To Take Your Birth Control Pills
Article
hospital gown
Quiz
 
Birth Control Pills Weight Gain
Article
Ortho Evra Birth Control Patch
Article
 
contraceptive pills
Slideshow
Young couple looking at each other, serious
Article
 
woman reading pregnancy test result
Article
calendar
Article