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Women's Health

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15 Healthy Lifestyle Tips After Your Hysterectomy

Nurture your health after a hysterectomy -- to keep weight and stress under control.
WebMD Feature

After a hysterectomy, a healthy lifestyle is no longer an option -- it's a necessity. Suddenly, weight gain is an issue. You may not sleep well. You may feel irritable. Your hormones are changing, and so is your body.

The good news: With good nutrition, exercise, and stress reduction, you can offset the downside of a hysterectomy.

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Start your healthy lifestyle before your hysterectomy, advises Gladys Tse, MD, assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Recipe for a Healthy Lifestyle Before Your Hysterectomy

Whether you're preventing weight gain -- or trying to melt body fat -- the basics are the same. Cut calories. Get regular aerobic exercise. Do strength training by lifting weights. It's the secret of weight loss: As you build more muscle, the body burns more calories.

"A lot of women get an exercise trainer before the surgery, and get into Weight Watchers or another program to change their diet," Tse tells WebMD. "They understand they would have a hard time after surgery, so they started this beforehand to avoid it. Some of the healthiest women I've seen are those who were counseled before their surgery."

If you’re having a hysterectomy and want optimal health, here are tips to follow for better nutrition, stress reduction, and fitness.

Tips for Good Nutrition

Feast on colorful foods. Fill your plate with vibrant fruits and veggies -- red, orange, yellow, and deep green. These are packed with disease-fighting antioxidants and fiber and should be the mainstay of your diet.

Get plenty of grains & legumes. Whole grains like oatmeal, brown rice, whole-wheat pasta and cereals are all great high-fiber options. Black, red, and kidney beans are high in fiber and antioxidants.

Choose proteins & fats wisely. You need a balance of lean protein (like skinless chicken), fatty fish like salmon (with omega-3 fats), and vegetable protein. Avoid trans and saturated fats, like fats found in butter, margarine, salad dressing, fried foods, snack foods, sweets. Vegetable oils (like olive oil and peanut oil) are good fats.

Get enough calcium. For bone health, get at least 1,200 mg of calcium daily, plus vitamin D. Take supplements or eat three to four 8-ounce servings of low-fat dairy daily. Hard cheese, yogurt, fortified products like orange juice, canned salmon, broccoli, and legumes are good calcium sources. Talk to your doctor about a bone density scan.

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