Schizophrenia: When to Call the Doctor

If someone you love has schizophrenia, knowing when to call the doctor isn’t always easy -- and you can’t rely on your loved one to let you know he needs help.

During a psychotic episode, he may not know the difference between what’s real and what isn’t. He could see and hear things that aren’t there (hallucinations) or believe something is controlling his thoughts (delusions). He might even think that you’re plotting against him.

This can be scary and upsetting. But stay calm, trust your intuition, and remember that professional help is within reach.

When Should You Call the Doctor?

Most of the time your loved one won’t suddenly lose complete control of himself. You’ll probably notice signs leading up to a psychotic episode.

Symptoms vary, but there are some common ones, including:

  • Mistrustful or suspicious beliefs or ideas
  • Unexpected outbursts
  • Isolation from friends and family
  • Noticeable mood changes
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Bizarre behavior

Call your doctor for advice if your loved one’s mood changes or his thinking seems unusual. If he’s stopped taking his medication, but doesn’t seem like he’s going to hurt you or anyone else, encourage him to visit the doctor with you.

When to Call 911 Instead

If you’re afraid help from your doctor isn’t going to be fast enough, you may need call to 911. To decide when you should call for help, ask yourself these questions:

  • Is your loved one threatening to harm himself or someone else, including you?
  • Has he ever attempted suicide before?
  • Is he unable to feed or dress himself?
  • Is he living on the streets?

If you answered “yes” to any of these, call 911 or a local emergency number. Don’t try to solve the situation on your own or put yourself at risk.

If you think there’s any chance that he will try to commit suicide, ask someone to stay with him while you call for emergency help.

When to Ask for the Police

Most people with schizophrenia are not violent. But just like you would in any other situation, if you’re scared for your safety, immediately call 911 and ask the dispatcher for the police.

Tell them that your loved one is psychotic, and explain you need help controlling his behavior and getting him medical treatment. Ask the police not to show any weapons when they arrive so they don’t alarm him more.

If possible, someone should stay with you while you wait. And you should also call his doctor right away.

No matter what, remember that you and your loved one deserve to get the help you need quickly, so you can get back on track with his wellness plan.

WebMD Medical Reference Reviewed by Joseph Goldberg, MD on August 13, 2016

Sources

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: “Diseases and Conditions: Schizophrenia.”

National Institute of Mental Health: “Schizophrenia.”

Center for Addiction and Mental Health: “Schizophrenia: An Information Guide.”

World Fellowship for Schizophrenia and Allied Disorders: “Warning Signs of Illness, Managing a Crisis, Risk of Suicide.”

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