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What will happen to my menstrual cycle after I stop taking birth control pills?

ANSWER

It may get off track. Even if your periods were like clockwork before you started birth control, it might take a few months for them to straighten out after you stop. And if you had irregular periods, you’ll probably be off-kilter again -- the reliable schedule you enjoyed (or the long breaks between periods) came from the hormones in the pill. If your periods stopped altogether, it may take a few months for them to start up again.

SOURCES:

Contraception: An International Reproductive Health Journal , November 2011.

Fertility and Sterility, May 2009.

 NHS Choices: “Contraception Guide: The Contraception Injection."

Planned Parenthood: “Birth Control Q&A.”

“Noncontraceptive Uses of Hormonal Contraceptives,” , January 2010. ACOG Practice Bulletin 110

“Effects of progestin-only birth control on weight,” Cochrane.org, July 2, 2013.

“Effect of birth control pills and patches on weight,” Cochrane.org, Jan. 29, 2014.

European Journal of Contraception and Reproductive Health Care: “The influence of combined oral contraceptives on female sexual desire: a systematic review.”

American Family Physician , Dec. 15, 2010.

International Journal of Endocrinology & Metabolism , December 2012.

Reviewed by Nivin Todd on August 23, 2018

SOURCES:

Contraception: An International Reproductive Health Journal , November 2011.

Fertility and Sterility, May 2009.

 NHS Choices: “Contraception Guide: The Contraception Injection."

Planned Parenthood: “Birth Control Q&A.”

“Noncontraceptive Uses of Hormonal Contraceptives,” , January 2010. ACOG Practice Bulletin 110

“Effects of progestin-only birth control on weight,” Cochrane.org, July 2, 2013.

“Effect of birth control pills and patches on weight,” Cochrane.org, Jan. 29, 2014.

European Journal of Contraception and Reproductive Health Care: “The influence of combined oral contraceptives on female sexual desire: a systematic review.”

American Family Physician , Dec. 15, 2010.

International Journal of Endocrinology & Metabolism , December 2012.

Reviewed by Nivin Todd on August 23, 2018

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What happens to my periods after I stop taking birth control pills?

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