PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What are the physical symptoms of nicotine withdrawal?

ANSWER

Your symptoms of withdrawal depend on many things, like how long and how many packs a day you’ve smoked. But for the most part, you can expect to have these common physical issues when you quit:

  • Appetite. Within a day or so of your last cigarette, your appetite will shoot up for a while. The first 2 weeks are the worst -- most people gain about 5 to 10 pounds as they try to quit smoking.
  • Cravings. Nicotine cravings are the symptom you will deal with the longest, and they could start just 30 minutes after your last cigarette. Each craving will last only about 15 to 20 minutes, but they’ll keep coming. Try to avoid triggers (like drinking alcohol or being around people who smoke) and find ways to get yourself through each craving.
  • Cough. Your respiratory system can’t clean itself very well when nicotine is around. As your body works it out, you’ll probably have a cough that could last for a few weeks.
  • Headaches and dizziness. These are usually on the mild side, and they’re often the first withdrawal symptom to show up and first to go away.
  • Fatigue. Nicotine is a stimulant and perks you up, so you’ll probably feel tired without it. But you’ll also be restless and might have insomnia.
  • Constipation. For the first month, this can be another unpleasant side effect.

From: What is Nicotine Withdrawal? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Quit Smoking Community: “Nicotine Withdrawal Timeline.”

American Cancer Society: “Why is it so hard to quit smoking?”

SmokeFree.gov: “Managing Withdrawal.”

National Cancer Institute: “How To Handle Withdrawal Symptoms and Triggers When You Decide To Quit Smoking.”

Reviewed by Sabrina Felson on March 26, 2019

SOURCES:

Quit Smoking Community: “Nicotine Withdrawal Timeline.”

American Cancer Society: “Why is it so hard to quit smoking?”

SmokeFree.gov: “Managing Withdrawal.”

National Cancer Institute: “How To Handle Withdrawal Symptoms and Triggers When You Decide To Quit Smoking.”

Reviewed by Sabrina Felson on March 26, 2019

NEXT QUESTION:

What are the mental, emotional, and behavioral symptoms of nicotine withdrawal?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

    Other Answers On: