Overview

Blueberries are edible fruits from the Vaccinium angustifolium plant. Blueberry is a common food and is also sometimes used as medicine.

Blueberries are high in fiber, which can help with normal digestion. They also contain vitamin C, other antioxidants, and chemicals that might reduce swelling and destroy cancer cells.

People use blueberry for aging, memory and thinking skills, high blood pressure, athletic performance, diabetes, and many other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these uses.

Don't confuse blueberry with bilberry. They are related but they are not the same. In countries outside of the US, the name blueberry is used to refer to the plant that is often called bilberry in the US.

How does it work ?

Uses & Effectiveness ?

We currently have no information for BLUEBERRY Uses.

Side Effects

When taken by mouth: Blueberry whole fruit, juice, and powders are commonly consumed in foods. Drinks made with freeze-dried blueberries might cause constipation, diarrhea, nausea, or vomiting in some people.

There isn't enough reliable information to know if taking blueberry leaf is safe or what the side effects might be.

When applied to the skin: There isn't enough reliable information to know if blueberry is safe or what the side effects might be.

Special Precautions and Warnings

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Blueberry fruit is commonly consumed in foods. But there isn't enough reliable information to know if blueberry is safe to use in larger amounts as medicine when pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and stick to food amounts.

Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency: G6PD is a genetic disorder. People with this disorder have problems breaking down some chemicals in food and drugs. One or more of these chemicals are found in blueberries. If you have G6PD, check with your healthcare provider before eating blueberries.

Surgery: Blueberry fruit and leaf might affect blood glucose levels and could interfere with blood sugar control during and after surgery.

Interactions ?

    Minor Interaction

    Be watchful with this combination

  • Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs) interacts with BLUEBERRY

    Blueberry fruit or leaf might lower blood sugar levels. Taking blueberry along with diabetes medications might cause blood sugar to drop too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely.

  • Buspirone (BuSpar) interacts with BLUEBERRY

    Blueberry juice might decrease how fast the body gets rid of buspirone. But this is not likely to be a major concern.

  • Flurbiprofen (Ansaid, others) interacts with BLUEBERRY

    Blueberry juice might decrease how fast the body gets rid of flurbiprofen. But this is not likely to be a major concern.

Dosing

Blueberries are commonly consumed in foods. As medicine, freeze-dried blueberries have most often been used by adults in doses of 22-50 grams by mouth daily for up to 16 weeks. Blueberry extracts and blueberry leaf extracts have also been used. Speak with a healthcare provider to find out what type of product and dose might be best for a specific condition.

View References

CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version. © Therapeutic Research Faculty 2018.