WHEATGRASS

OTHER NAME(S):

Agropyre, Agropyron, Agropyron repens, Agropyron firmum, Blé en Herbe, Brote del Trigo, Couchgrass, Couch Grass, Cutch, Dog Grass, Dog-grass, Doggrass, Durfa Grass, Elytrigia repens, Elymus repens, Graminis Rhizoma, Herbe de Blé, Quack Grass, Quackgrass, Quitch Grass, Scotch Quelch, Triticum, Triticum firmum, Triticum repens, Twitchgrass, Wheat Grass, Witch Grass.<br/><br/>

Overview

Overview Information

Wheatgrass is a kind of grass. The above-ground parts, roots, and rhizome are used to make medicine. Wheatgrass is primarily used as a concentrated source of nutrients. It contains vitamin A, vitamin C, and vitamin E, iron, calcium, magnesium, and amino acids.

Wheatgrass is taken by mouth to increase production of hemoglobin, the chemical in red blood cells that carries oxygen, in patients with a blood disorder called beta-thalassemia. It is also commonly used for a variety of conditions including inflammatory bowel syndrome, diabetes, high cholesterol, and many more, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these uses.

Wheatgrass juice is a popular health drink. It is thought to benefit health only when fresh and taken on an empty stomach immediately after being mixed. But there is no research to date that supports this.

In foods and beverages, wheatgrass extracts are used as a flavoring component.

How does it work?

Wheatgrass contains chemicals that might have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory (anti-swelling) activity. This is why some people think it might be helpful for conditions such as\ inflammatory bowel disease. It also contains a chemical that might fight bacterial infections.

Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Insufficient Evidence for

  • Blood disorder called beta-thalassemia. Research evaluating wheatgrass for treating a blood disorder called beta-thalassemia shows conflicting results. Some early research suggests that drinking 100 mL of wheatgrass juice daily for 18 months or taking tablets containing 1-4 grams of wheatgrass daily for 12 months can reduce the need for blood transfusions in children with beta-thalassemia. However, other early research suggests that taking tablets containing 100-200 mg/kg of wheatgrass daily for 12 months does not reduce the need for blood transfusions in children and adults with beta-thalassemia. Larger, higher quality studies are needed to resolve these conflicting results.
  • Heel pain. Early research suggests that applying a wheatgrass cream to the bottom of the feet twice daily for 6 weeks does not reduce heel pain.
  • High cholesterol. Early research suggests that taking wheatgrass powder in a capsule daily for 10 weeks reduces total cholesterol and triglyceride cholesterol levels by a small amount in women with elevated cholesterol levels.
  • Inflammatory bowel disease (ulcerative colitis). There is some early research that freshly extracted wheatgrass juice might reduce overall disease activity and the severity of rectal bleeding in people with ulcerative colitis.
  • Anemia.
  • Cancer.
  • Diabetes.
  • High blood pressure.
  • Preventing infections.
  • Preventing tooth decay.
  • Reducing cholesterol.
  • Removing drugs, metals, toxins, and cancer-causing substances from the body.
  • Wound healing.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of wheatgrass for these uses.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

Wheatgrass is LIKELY SAFE when taken in food amounts. It is POSSIBLY SAFE for most adults when taken by mouth in medicinal amounts for up to 18 months or when applied to the skin as a cream for up to 6 weeks. Not enough is known about the safety of long-term use of wheatgrass as medicine.

Wheatgrass can cause nausea, appetite loss, and constipation.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking wheatgrass if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Diabetes: Wheatgrass may lower blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. Watch for signs of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and monitor your blood sugar carefully if you have diabetes and use wheatgrass.

Surgery: Wheatgrass might lower blood sugar and might interfere with blood sugar control during and after surgery. Stop taking wheatgrass as a medicine at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Interactions

Interactions?

We currently have no information for WHEATGRASS Interactions.

Dosing

Dosing

The appropriate dose of wheatgrass depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for wheatgrass. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

View References

REFERENCES:

  • Marawaha, R. K., Bansal, D., Kaur, S., and Trehan, A. Wheat grass juice reduces transfusion requirement in patients with thalassemia major: a pilot study. Indian Pediatr. 2004;41(7):716-720. View abstract.
  • Young, M. A., Cook, J. L., and Webster, K. E. The effect of topical wheatgrass cream on chronic plantar fasciitis: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Complement Ther Med 2006;14(1):3-9. View abstract.
  • Bar-Sela G, Cohen M, Ben-Arye E, Epelbaum R. The medical use of wheatgrass: review of the gap between basic and clinical applications. Mini Rev Med Chem 2015;15(12):1002-10. View abstract.
  • Ben-Arye E, Golden E, Wengrower D, et al. Wheat grass juice in the treatment of active distal ulcerative colitis a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial. Scand J Gastroenterol 2002;4:444-9.. View abstract.
  • Chauhan M. A pilot study on wheat grass juice for its phytochemical, nutritional and therapeutic potential on chronic diseases. IJCS. 2014;2(4):27-34.
  • Choudhary DR, Naithani R, Panigrahi I, et al. Effect of wheat grass therapy on transfusion requirement in beta-thalassemia major. Indian J Pediatr 2009;76(4):375-6. View abstract.
  • Dr. Duke's Phytochemical and Ethnobotanical Databases. Available at: http://www.ars-grin.gov/duke/.
  • Kumar N, Iyer U. Impact of wheatgrass (Triticum aestivum L.) supplementation on atherogenic lipoproteins and menopausal symptoms in hyperlipidemic south asian women - a randomized controlled study. J Diet Suppl. 2017;14(5):503-513. doi: 10.1080/19390211.2016.1267063. View abstract.
  • Mohan Y, Jesuthankaraj GN1, Ramasamy Thangavelu N. Antidiabetic and antioxidant properties of Triticum aestivum in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Adv Pharmacol Sci 2013;2013:716073. View abstract.
  • Mukhopadhyay S, Basak J, Kar M, Mandal S, Mukhopadhyay A. The role of iron chelation activity of wheat grass juice in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome. J Clin Oncol 2009;7012. [Abstract 10046, 2009 ASCO Annual meeting]
  • Nenonen MT, Helve TA, Rauma AL, Hanninen OO. Uncooked, lactobacilli-rich, vegan food and rheumatoid arthritis. Br J Rheumatol 1998;37:274-81.
  • Rauma AL, Nenonen M, Helve T, et al. Effect of a strict vegan diet on energy and nutrient intakes by Finnish rheumatoid patients. Eur J Clin Nutr 1993;47:747-9. View abstract.
  • Shakya G, Randhi PK, Pajaniradje S, Mohankumar K, Rajagopalan R. Hypoglycaemic role of wheatgrass and its effect on carbohydrate metabolic enzymes in type II diabetic rats. Toxicol Ind Health 2016;32(6):1026-32. View abstract.
  • Singh K, Pannu MS, Singh P, Singh J. Effect of wheat grass tablets on the frequency of blood transfusions in Thalassemia Major. Indian J Pediatr 2010;77(1):90-1. View abstract.

More Resources for WHEATGRASS

CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version.
© Therapeutic Research Faculty 2018.