D-MANNOSE

OTHER NAME(S):

Carubinose, D-Manosa, Mannose, Seminose.<br/><br/>

Overview

Overview Information

D-mannose is a kind of sugar that is related to glucose.

D-mannose is used for preventing urinary tract infections (UTIs) and treating carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndrome, an inherited metabolic disorder.

How does it work?

D-mannose might treat the deficiency caused by a genetic defect that causes abnormal breakdown and production of mannose. D-mannose might prevent certain kinds of bacteria from sticking to the walls of the urinary tract and causing infection.

Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Possibly Effective for

  • Treating a rare inherited disorder called carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndrome type 1b. Taking d-mannose seems to improve protein loss, liver function, low blood sugar, and blood clotting disorders in people with this condition.

Insufficient Evidence for

  • Preventing and treating urinary tract infections (UTIs). Early research shows that taking d-mannose for 13 days might reduce symptoms of UTIs, such as burning and increased urination. Also, taking D-mannose powder for 6 months after a UTI might prevent UTIs from occurring again.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of d-mannose for these uses.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

D-mannose is POSSIBLY SAFE for most adults when taken by mouth. It can cause diarrhea, loose stools, and bloating. In high doses, it might harm the kidneys.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of d-mannose during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Diabetes: Some research suggests that d-mannose might make blood sugar control more difficult in people with diabetes.

Interactions

Interactions?

We currently have no information for D-MANNOSE Interactions.

Dosing

Dosing

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

CHILDREN

BY MOUTH:

  • For treating a rare inherited disorder called carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndrome type 1b: 0.3-1 grams/kg of d-mannose daily has been used.

View References

REFERENCES:

  • Alton G, Hasilik M, Niehues R, et al. Direct utilization of mannose for mammalian glycoprotein biosynthesis. Glycobiology 1998;8:285-95. View abstract.
  • Davis JA, Freeze HH. Studies of mannose metabolism and effects of long-term mannose ingestion in the mouse. Biochim Biophys Acta 2001;1528:116-26. View abstract.
  • de Lonlay P, Cuer M, Vuillaumier-Barrot S, et al. Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia as a presenting sign in phosphomannose isomerase deficiency: A new manifestation of carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndrome treatable with mannose. J Pediatr 1999;135:379-83. View abstract.
  • Domenici L, Monti M, Bracchi C, Giorgini M, Colagiovanni V, Muzii L, Benedetti Panici P. D-mannose: a promising support for acute urinary tract infections in women. A pilot study. Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci. 2016 Jul;20(13):2920-5. View abstract.
  • Freinkel N, Lewis NJ, Akazawa S, et al. The honeybee syndrome - implications of the teratogenicity of mannose in rat-embryo culture. N Engl J Med 1984;310:223-30. View abstract.
  • Hendriksz CJ, McClean P, Henderson MJ, et al. Successful treatment of carbohydrate deficient glycoprotein syndrome type 1b with oral mannose. Arch Dis Child 2001;85:339-40. View abstract.
  • Kranj&#269;ec B, Pape&#353; D, Altarac S. D-mannose powder for prophylaxis of recurrent urinary tract infections in women: a randomized clinical trial. World J Urol. 2014 Feb;32(1):79-84. View abstract.
  • Michaels EK, Chmiel JS, Plotkin BJ, Schaeffer AJ. Effect of D-mannose and D-glucose on Escherichia coli bacteriuria in rats. Urol Res 1983;11:97-102 . View abstract.
  • Niehues R, Hasilik M, Alton G, et al. Carbohydrate-deficient glycoprotein syndrome type Ib. Phosphomannose isomerase deficiency and mannose therapy. J Clin Invest 1998;101:1414-20. View abstract.
  • Ofek I, Goldhar J, Eshdat Y, Sharon N. The importance of mannose specific adhesins (lectins) in infections caused by Escherichia coli. Scand J Infect Dis Suppl 1982;33:61-7.
  • Ofek I, Mosek A, Sharon N. Mannose-specific adherence of Escherichia coli freshly excreted in the urine of patients with urinary tract infections, and of isolates subcultured from the infected urine. Infect Immun 1981;34:708-11. View abstract.
  • Schaeffer AJ, Chmiel JS, Duncan JL, Falkowski WS. Mannose-sensitive adherence of Escherichia coli to epithelial cells from women with recurrent urinary tract infections. J Urol 1984;131:906-10. View abstract.
  • Venegas MF, Navas EL, Gaffney RA, et al. Binding of type 1-piliated Escherichia coli to vaginal mucus. Infect Immun 1995;63:416-22. View abstract.
  • Vicariotto F. Effectiveness of an association of a cranberry dry extract, D-mannose, and the two microorganisms Lactobacillus plantarum LP01 and Lactobacillus paracasei LPC09 in women affected by cystitis: a pilot study. J Clin Gastroenterol. 2014 Nov-Dec;48 Suppl 1:S96-101. View abstract.
  • Westphal V, Kjaergaard S, Davis JA, et al. Genetic and metabolic analysis of the first adult with congenital disorder of glycosylation type Ib: long-term outcome and effects of mannose supplementation. Mol Genet Metab 2001;73:77-85. View abstract.

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CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version.
© Therapeutic Research Faculty 2018.