BROCCOLI

OTHER NAME(S):

Brassica Oleracea Italica Group, Brassica oleracea var. italica, Brocoli, Brócoli, Broccoli Flower, Calabrese, Purple Sprouting Broccoli.<br/><br/>

Overview

Overview Information

Broccoli is a vegetable. The parts that grow above the ground are used to make medicine.

Broccoli is used for preventing cancer of the prostate, breast, colon, bladder, and stomach. Some people also use it for boosting the effectiveness of the immune system.

How does it work?

Chemicals in broccoli might have cancer-preventing and antioxidant effects.

Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Possibly Effective for

Insufficient Evidence for

  • Bladder cancer. There is some evidence that eating 1.75 cups of broccoli or cabbage daily might lower the risk of developing bladder cancer by about 30%.
  • Breast cancer. There is some evidence that eating broccoli might modestly reduce younger women’s risk of getting breast cancer. However, eating broccoli does not seem to help prevent breast cancer in older (postmenopausal) women.
  • Cancer of the colon and rectum. Some research suggests that eating broccoli might help prevent colorectal cancer.
  • Fibromyalgia. Early research suggests that taking ascorbigen and broccoli powder by mouth might reduce pain and other symptoms in people with fibromyalgia.
  • Prostate cancer. Some research suggests that eating broccoli and related vegetables, such as Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, and cabbage, might help to prevent prostate cancer. However, other research finds no link between eating these vegetables and lowering prostate cancer risk.
  • Stomach cancer. Some research suggests that eating broccoli might help to prevent stomach cancer.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of broccoli for these uses.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

Broccoli is LIKELY SAFE in the small amounts found in a normal diet. There's not enough information to know if broccoli is safe when taken in larger medicinal amounts.

When applied to the skin, broccoli can cause an allergic rash in hypersensitive people.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Broccoli is LIKELY SAFE for pregnant and breast-feeding women in food amounts. But larger medicinal amounts should be avoided until more is known.

Interactions

Interactions?

We currently have no information for BROCCOLI Interactions.

Dosing

Dosing

The appropriate dose of broccoli depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for broccoli. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

View References

REFERENCES:

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  • Balk JL. Indole-3-carbinol for cancer prevention. Altern Med Alert 2000; 3:105-7.
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  • Srivastava B, Shukla Y. Antitumour promoting activity of indole-3-carbinol in mouse skin carcinogenesis. Cancer Lett 1998;134:91-5. View abstract.
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  • Telang NT, Katdare M, Bradlow HL, et al. Inhibition of proliferation and modulation of estradiol metabolism: novel mechanisms for breast cancer prevention by the phytochemical indole-3-carbinol. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med 1997;216:246-52. View abstract.
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More Resources for BROCCOLI

CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

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