TINOSPORA CORDIFOLIA

OTHER NAME(S):

Ambervel, Amrita, Gilo, Giloe, Giloya, Glunchanb, Guduchi, Gulancha Tinospora, Gulvel, Gurcha, Heart-Leaved Moonseed, Heavenly Elixir, Indian Tinospora, Jetwatika, Moonseed, T. Cordifolia, TC, TCRE, TCRET, Tinospora, Tinospora Indien, Tinosporia Cordifolus.<br/><br/>

Overview

Overview Information

Tinospora cordifolia is a shrub that is native to India. Its root, stems, and leaves are used in Ayurvedic medicine.

Tinospora cordifolia is used for diabetes, high cholesterol, allergic rhinitis (hay fever), upset stomach, gout, lymphoma and other cancers, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), hepatitis, peptic ulcer disease (PUD), fever, gonorrhea, syphilis, and to boost the immune system.

How does it work?

Tinospora cordifolia contains many different chemicals that might affect the body. Some of these chemicals have antioxidant effects. Others might increase the activity of the body's immune system. Some chemicals might have activity against cancer cells in test animals. Most research has been done in test tubes or in animals. There isn't enough information to know the effects of Tinospora cordifolia in the human body.

Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Possibly Effective for

  • Allergies (hay fever). A particular extract of Tinospora cordifolia (Tinofend, Verdure Sciences) seems to significantly decrease sneezing and nasal itching, discharge, and stuffy nose after about 2 months of treatment.

Insufficient Evidence for

More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of Tinospora cordifolia for these uses.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

Tinospora cordifolia seems to be safe when used short-term. The safety of long-term use, more than 8 weeks, is not known.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of Tinospora cordifolia during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Diabetes: Tinospora cordifolia might lower blood sugar levels. Use it cautiously if you have diabetes, and monitor your blood sugar levels. The doses of your diabetes medications might need to be adjusted.

"Autoimmune diseases" such as multiple sclerosis (MS), lupus (systemic lupus erythematosus, SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), or other conditions: Tinospora cordifolia might cause the immune system to become more active, and this could increase the symptoms of autoimmune diseases. If you have one of these conditions, it's best to avoid using Tinospora cordifolia.

Surgery: Tinospora cordifolia might affect blood sugar levels, so there is a concern that it might interfere with blood sugar control during and after surgery. Stop taking Tinospora cordifolia at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Interactions

Interactions?

Moderate Interaction

Be cautious with this combination

!
  • Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs) interacts with TINOSPORA CORDIFOLIA

    Tinospora cordifolia might decrease blood sugar. Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar. Taking Tinospora cordifolia along with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to go too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your diabetes medication might need to be changed.<br/><br/> Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), glipizide (Glucotrol), tolbutamide (Orinase), and others.

  • Medications that decrease the immune system (Immunosuppressants) interacts with TINOSPORA CORDIFOLIA

    Tinospora cordifolia might increase the immune system. Taking it along with some medications that decrease the immune system might decrease the effectiveness of these medications.<br/><br/> Some medications that decrease the immune system include azathioprine (Imuran), basiliximab (Simulect), cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune), daclizumab (Zenapax), muromonab-CD3 (OKT3, Orthoclone OKT3), mycophenolate (CellCept), tacrolimus (FK506, Prograf), sirolimus (Rapamune), prednisone (Deltasone, Orasone), corticosteroids (glucocorticoids), and others.

Dosing

Dosing

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY MOUTH:

  • For allergic rhinitis (hay fever): 300 mg of a specific Tinospora cordifolia aqueous stem extract (Tinofend, Verdure Sciences) three times daily for 8 weeks.

View References

REFERENCES:

  • Badar VA, Thawani VR, Wakode PT, et al. Efficacy of Tinospora cordifolia in allergic rhinitis. J Ethnopharmacol 2005;96:445-9. View abstract.
  • Goel HC, Prasad J, Singh S, et al. Radioprotective potential of an herbal extract of Tinospora cordifolia. Radiat Res (Tokyo) 2004;45:61-8. View abstract.
  • Grover JK, Vats V, Rathi SS. Anti-hyperglycemic effect of Eugenia jambolana and Tinospora cordifolia in experimental diabetes and their effects on key metabolic enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism. J Ethnopharmacol 2000;73:461-70. View abstract.
  • Jagetia GC, Nayak V, Vidyasagar MS. Evaluation of the antineoplastic activity of guduchi (Tinospora cordifolia) in cultured HeLa cells. Cancer Lett 1998;127:71-82. View abstract.
  • Kapil A, Sharma S. Immunopotentiating compounds from Tinospora cordifolia. J Ethnopharmacol 1997;58:89-95. View abstract.
  • Leyon PV, Kuttan G. Effect of Tinospora cordifolia on the cytokine profile of angiogenesis-induced animals. Int Immunopharmacol 2004;4:1569-75. View abstract.
  • Manjrekar PN, Jolly CI, Narayanan S. Comparative studies of the immunomodulatory activity of Tinospora cordifolia and Tinospora sinensis. Fitoterapia 2000;71:254-7. View abstract.
  • Nair PK, Rodriguez S, Ramachandran R, et al. Immune stimulating properties of a novel polysaccharide from the medicinal plant Tinospora cordifolia. Int Immunopharmacol 2004;4:1645-59. View abstract.
  • Prince PS, Menon VP. Antioxidant activity of Tinospora cordifolia roots in experimental diabetes. J Ethnopharmacol 1999;65:277-81. View abstract.
  • Prince PS, Padmanabhan M, Menon VP, et al. Restoration of antioxidant defence by ethanolic Tinospora cordifolia root extract in alloxan-induced diabetic liver and kidney. Phytother Res 2004;18:785-7. View abstract.
  • Rawal A, Muddeshwar M, Biswas S. Effect of Rubia cordifolia, Fagonia cretica linn, and Tinospora cordifolia on free radical generation and lipid peroxidation during oxygen-glucose deprivation in rat hippocampal slices. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 2004;324:588-96. View abstract.
  • Rawal AK, Muddeshwar MG, Biswas SK. Rubia cordifolia, Fagonia cretica linn and Tinospora cordifolia exert neuroprotection by modulating the antioxidant system in rat hippocampal slices subjected to oxygen glucose deprivation. BMC Complement Altern Med 2004;4:11. View abstract.
  • Singh N, Singh SM, Shrivastava P. Immunomodulatory and antitumor actions of medicinal plant Tinospora cordifolia are mediated through activation of tumor-associated macrophages. Immunopharmacol Immunotoxicol 2004;26:145-62. View abstract.
  • Stanely Mainzen Prince P, Menon VP, Gunasekaran G. Hypolipidaemic action of Tinospora cordifolia roots in alloxan diabetic rats. J Ethnopharmacol 1999;64:53-7. View abstract.
  • Stanely Mainzen Prince P, Menon VP. Hypoglycaemic and hypolipidaemic action of alcohol extract of Tinospora cordifolia roots in chemical induced diabetes in rats. Phytother Res 2003;17:410-3. View abstract.

More Resources for TINOSPORA CORDIFOLIA

CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

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