CORIANDER

OTHER NAME(S):

Chinese Parsley, Cilantro, Coriandre, Coriandri Fructus, Coriander Essential Oil, Coriandrum sativum, Dhanyaka, Huile Essentielle de Coriandre, Koriander, Kustumburi, Persil Arabe, Persil Chinois, Persil Mexicain, Punaise Mâle.

Overview

Overview Information

Coriander is a plant. Both the leaves and fruit (seeds) of coriander are used as food and medicine. However, the term "coriander" is typically used to refer to the fruit. Coriander leaves are usually referred to as cilantro. In the following sections, the term "coriander" will be used to describe the fruit.

Coriander is used for a long-term disorder of the large intestines that causes stomach pain (irritable bowel syndrome or IBS), constipation, diarrhea, gas (flatulence), nausea, athlete's foot (Tinea pedis), and many other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these uses.

In foods, coriander is used as a culinary spice and to prevent food poisoning.

In manufacturing, coriander is used as a flavoring agent in medicines and tobacco and as a fragrance in cosmetics and soaps.

How does it work?

Coriander may lower blood sugar and help kill some parasites, but there currently isn't enough information to know how coriander might work for medicinal uses.

Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Insufficient Evidence for

  • Athlete's foot (Tinea pedis). Early research suggests that putting 6% coriander oil on the skin helps to improve symptoms of athlete's foot.
  • A long-term disorder of the large intestines that causes stomach pain (irritable bowel syndrome or IBS).
  • Anxiety.
  • Bacterial or fungal infections.
  • Constipation.
  • Convulsions.
  • Diabetes.
  • Diarrhea.
  • Insomnia.
  • Gas (flatulence).
  • Joint pain and swelling.
  • Nausea.
  • Stomach upset.
  • Worms.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of coriander for these uses.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

When taken by mouth: Coriander is LIKELY SAFE when taken in food amounts. It is POSSIBLY SAFE for most people when taken in larger amounts as medicine. Coriander can cause allergic reactions. Symptoms of such reactions can include asthma, nasal swelling, hives, or swelling inside the mouth. These reactions appear to be most common in people who work with spices in the food industry.

When applied to the skin: Coriander is POSSIBLY SAFE when used appropriately. It can cause skin irritation and itching.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There isn't enough reliable information to know if coriander is safe to use when pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Allergies. People who are allergic to mugwort, aniseed, caraway, fennel, dill, or similar plants might have allergic reactions to coriander.

Diabetes. Coriander might lower blood sugar levels. If you have diabetes and take coriander, monitor your blood sugar levels closely.

Low blood pressure: Coriander might decrease blood pressure. This could cause blood pressure to go to low in people with low blood pressure. Use cautiously if you have low blood pressure or take medications to lower your blood pressure.

Surgery: Coriander might lower blood sugar. There is some concern that it might interfere with blood sugar control during surgery. Stop using coriander at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Interactions

Interactions?

We currently have no information for CORIANDER Interactions.

Dosing

Dosing

The appropriate dose of coriander depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for coriander. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

View References

REFERENCES:

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  • Al Said, M. S., Al Khamis, K. I., Islam, M. W., Parmar, N. S., Tariq, M., and Ageel, A. M. Post-coital antifertility activity of the seeds of Coriandrum sativum in rats. J Ethnopharmacol. 1987;21(2):165-173. View abstract.
  • Ashwood-Smith, M. J., Warrington, P. J., Jenkins, M., Ceska, O., and Romaniuk, P. J. Photobiological properties of a novel, naturally occurring furoisocoumarin, coriandrin. Photochem.Photobiol. 1989;50(6):745-751. View abstract.
  • Basilico, M. Z. and Basilico, J. C. Inhibitory effects of some spice essential oils on Aspergillus ochraceus NRRL 3174 growth and ochratoxin A production. Lett.Appl.Microbiol. 1999;29(4):238-241. View abstract.
  • Bub, S., Brinckmann, J., Cicconetti, G., and Valentine, B. Efficacy of an herbal dietary supplement (Smooth Move) in the management of constipation in nursing home residents: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. J Am.Med.Dir.Assoc. 2006;7(9):556-561. View abstract.
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  • NTP Carcinogenesis Studies of Food Grade Geranyl Acetate (71% Geranyl Acetate, 29% Citronellyl Acetate) (CAS No. 105-87-3) in F344/N Rats and B6C3F1 Mice (Gavage Study). Natl.Toxicol.Program Tech.Rep Ser. 1987;252:1-162. View abstract.
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