GREEN COFFEE

OTHER NAME(S):

Arabica Green Coffee Beans, Café Marchand, Café Verde, Café Vert, Coffea arabica, Coffea arnoldiana, Coffea bukobensis, Coffea canephora, Coffea liberica, Coffea robusta, Extrait de Café Vert, Extrait de F&egrave;ve de Café Vert, F&egrave;ves de Café Vert, F&egrave;ves de Café Vert Arabica, F&egrave;ves de Café Vert Robusta, GCBE, GCE, Green Coffee Beans, Green Coffee Bean Extract, Green Coffee Extract, Green Coffee Powder, Poudre de Café Vert, Raw Coffee, Raw Coffee Extract, Robusta Green Coffee Beans, Svetol.<br/><br/>

Overview

Overview Information

"Green coffee" beans are coffee seeds (beans) of Coffea fruits that have not yet been roasted. The roasting process of coffee beans reduces amounts of the chemical chlorogenic acid. Therefore, green coffee beans have a higher level of chlorogenic acid compared to regular, roasted coffee beans. Chlorogenic acid in green coffee is thought to have health benefits.

Green coffee became popular for weight loss after it was mentioned on the Dr. Oz show in 2012. The Dr. Oz show referred to it as "The green coffee bean that burns fat fast" and claims that no exercise or diet is needed.

People take green coffee by mouth for obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, Alzheimer's disease, and bacterial infections.

How does it work?

Green coffee beans are coffee beans that have not yet been roasted. These coffee beans contain a higher amount of the chemical chlorogenic acid. This chemical is thought to have health benefits. For high blood pressure it might affect blood vessels so that blood pressure is reduced.

For weight loss, chlorogenic acid in green coffee is thought to affect how the body handles blood sugar and metabolism.

Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Insufficient Evidence for

  • High blood pressure. Early research suggests that taking green coffee extracts containing 50 mg to 140 mg of chlorogenic acids daily for 4 weeks to 12 weeks can reduce blood pressure in Japanese adults with mild and untreated high blood pressure. Systolic blood pressure (the top number) appears to be reduced by 5 mmHg to 10 mmHg. Diastolic blood pressure (the bottom number) appears to be reduced by 3 mmHg to 7 mmHg.
  • Obesity. Early research shows that adults with obesity who take a specific green coffee extract (Svetol, Naturex) five times daily for 8 weeks to 12 weeks, either alone or together with the regular coffee product Coffee Slender (Med-Eq Ltd., Tonsberg, Norway), lose an average of 2.5 to 3.7 kg more weight than people taking a placebo or regular coffee by itself.
  • Alzheimer's disease.
  • Type 2 diabetes.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate green coffee for these uses.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

Green coffee is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth appropriately. Green coffee extracts taken in doses up to 480 mg daily have been used safely for up to 12 weeks. Also, a specific green coffee extract (Svetol, Naturex, South Hackensack, NJ) has been used safely in doses up to 200 mg five times daily for up to 12 weeks.

It is important to understand that green coffee contains caffeine, similar to regular coffee. Therefore, green coffee can cause caffeine-related side effects similar to coffee.

Caffeine can cause insomnia, nervousness and restlessness, stomach upset, nausea and vomiting, increased heart and breathing rate, and other side effects. Consuming large amounts of coffee might also cause headache, anxiety, agitation, ringing in the ears, and irregular heartbeats.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking green coffee if you are pregnant or breast feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use..

Abnormally high levels of homocysteine: Consuming a high dose of chlorogenic acid for a short duration has caused increased plasma homocysteine levels, which may be associated with conditions such as heart disease.

Anxiety disorders: The caffeine in green coffee might make anxiety worse.

Bleeding disorders: There is some concern that the caffeine in green coffee might make bleeding disorders worse.

Diabetes: Some research suggests that caffeine contained in green coffee might change the way people with diabetes process sugar. Caffeine has been reported to cause increases as well as decreases in blood sugar. Use caffeine with caution if you have diabetes and monitor your blood sugar carefully.

Diarrhea: Green coffee contains caffeine. The caffeine in coffee, especially when taken in large amounts, can worsen diarrhea.

Glaucoma: Taking caffeine which is contained in green coffee can increases pressure inside the eye. The increase starts within 30 minutes and lasts for at least 90 minutes.

High blood pressure: Taking caffeine found in green coffee might increase blood pressure in people with high blood pressure. However, this effect might be less in people who consume caffeine from coffee or other sources regularly.

High cholesterol: Certain components of unfiltered coffee have been shown to increase cholesterol levels. These components can be found in green coffee as well. However, it is unclear if green coffee can also cause increased cholesterol levels.

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS): Green coffee contains caffeine. The caffeine in coffee, especially when taken in large amounts, can worsen diarrhea and might worsen symptoms of IBS.

Thinning bones (osteoporosis): Caffeine from green coffee and other sources can increase the amount of calcium that is flushed out in the urine. This might weaken bones. If you have osteoporosis, limit caffeine consumption to less than 300 mg per day (approximately 2-3 cups of regular coffee). Taking calcium supplements may help to make up for calcium that is lost. Postmenopausal women who have an inherited condition that keeps them from processing vitamin D normally, should be especially cautious when using caffeine.

Interactions

Interactions?

We currently have no information for GREEN COFFEE Interactions.

Dosing

Dosing

The appropriate dose of green coffee depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for green coffee (in children/in adults). Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

View References

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