BUGLEWEED

OTHER NAME(S):

Ajuga, Archangle, Ashangee, Chanvre d’Eau, Green Wolf's Foot, Gypsy Weed, Gypsywort, Hoarhound, Lycope, Lycope d’Amérique, Lycope d’Europe, Lycope de Virginie, Lycopi Herba, Lycopus americanus, Lycopus europaeus, Lycopus Europea, Lycopus virginicus, Menta de Lobo, Patte-de-Loup, Paul's Betony, Sweet Bugle, Water Bugle, Water Hoarhound, Water Horehound, Virginia Water Horehound, Wolfstrapp.<br/><br/>

Overview

Overview Information

Bugleweed is a plant. People use the parts that grow above the ground for medicine.

Bugleweed is used to lower high levels of thyroid hormones (hyperthyroidism). It is also used to treat premenstrual syndrome; breast pain; nervousness; trouble sleeping (insomnia); and bleeding, especially nosebleeds and heavy bleeding during menstruation.

How does it work?

Bugleweed might reduce the body's production of thyroid hormone. Bugleweed also seems to reduce the release of the hormone prolactin, which might help relieve breast pain.

Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Insufficient Evidence for

More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of bugleweed for these uses.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

Bugleweed is POSSIBLY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth, but thyroid disease should not be self-treated due to possible complications. Long-term use of bugleweed can cause an enlarged thyroid gland. Discontinuing bugleweed abruptly can result in high levels of thyroid and prolactin, which might cause physical symptoms.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: It’s LIKELY UNSAFE to take bugleweed by mouth during pregnancy because it might affect hormones. It’s also LIKELY UNSAFE to take bugleweed by mouth while breast-feeding. It can affect milk production.

Diabetes: Bugleweed might lower blood sugar. If you have diabetes, use bugleweed cautiously, watch for symptoms of low blood sugar, and check your blood sugar carefully. The dose of your diabetes medications may need to be adjusted.

Surgery: Bugleweed might affect blood sugar levels. There is some concern that it might interfere with blood sugar control during and after surgery. Stop using bugleweed at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Enlarged thyroid or poorly functioning thyroid (thyroid hypofunction): Don’t use bugleweed if you have one of these conditions or are receiving thyroid treatments.

Interactions

Interactions?

Moderate Interaction

Be cautious with this combination

!
  • Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs) interacts with BUGLEWEED

    Bugleweed might decrease blood sugar. Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar. Taking bugleweed along with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to go too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your diabetes medication might need to be changed.<br/><br/> Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), glipizide (Glucotrol), tolbutamide (Orinase), and others.

  • Thyroid hormone interacts with BUGLEWEED

    Taking bugleweed might decrease how well thyroid hormone pills work. Don't take bugleweed if you take thyroid pills.

Dosing

Dosing

The appropriate dose of bugleweed depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for bugleweed. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

View References

REFERENCES:

  • [Complementary medicine. Calming lycopus]. Schweiz.Rundsch.Med Prax. 12-22-2004;93(51-52):2161. View abstract.
  • Auf'mkolk, M., Ingbar, J. C., Kubota, K., Amir, S. M., and Ingbar, S. H. Extracts and auto-oxidized constituents of certain plants inhibit the receptor-binding and the biological activity of Graves' immunoglobulins. Endocrinology 1985;116(5):1687-1693. View abstract.
  • Auf'mkolk, M., Kohrle, J., Gumbinger, H., Winterhoff, H., and Hesch, R. D. Antihormonal effects of plant extracts: iodothyronine deiodinase of rat liver is inhibited by extracts and secondary metabolites of plants. Horm.Metab Res 1984;16(4):188-192. View abstract.
  • Bucar, F. and Kartnig, T. Flavone Glucuronides of Lycopus virginicus. Planta Med 1995;61(4):378-380. View abstract.
  • HOERHAMMER, L., WAGNER, H., and SCHILCHER, H. [On the knowledge of the constituents of Lycopus europaeus. 1. On the constituents of medicinal plants with hormone and antihormone-like action.]. Arzneimittelforschung. 1962;12:1-7. View abstract.
  • Hussein, A. A. and Rodriguez, B. Isopimarane diterpenoids from Lycopus europaeus. J Nat.Prod. 2000;63(3):419-421. View abstract.
  • Kartnig, T., Bucar, F., and Neuhold, S. Flavonoids from the Aboveground Parts of Lycopus virginicus. Planta Med 1993;59(6):563-564. View abstract.
  • Rompel, A., Fischer, H., Meiwes, D., Buldt-Karentzopoulos, K., Magrini, A., Eicken, C., Gerdemann, C., and Krebs, B. Substrate specificity of catechol oxidase from Lycopus europaeus and characterization of the bioproducts of enzymic caffeic acid oxidation. FEBS Lett. 2-19-1999;445(1):103-110. View abstract.
  • Sourgens, H., Winterhoff, H., Gumbinger, H. G., and Kemper, F. H. Antihormonal effects of plant extracts. Planta Med 1982;45(6):78-86. View abstract.
  • Vonhoff, C., Baumgartner, A., Hegger, M., Korte, B., Biller, A., and Winterhoff, H. Extract of Lycopus europaeus L. reduces cardiac signs of hyperthyroidism in rats. Life Sci 2-2-2006;78(10):1063-1070. View abstract.
  • Wagner, H., Horhammer, L., and Frank, U. [Lithospermic acid, the antihormonally active principle of Lycopus europaeus L. and Symphytum officinale. 3. Ingredients of medicinal plants with hormonal and antihormonal-like effect]. Arzneimittelforschung 1970;20(5):705-713. View abstract.
  • Auf'mkolk M, Ingbar JC, Amir SM, et al. Inhibition by certain plant extracts of the binding and adenylate cyclase stimulatory effect of bovine thyrotropin in human thyroid membranes. Endocrinology. 1984 Aug;115:527-34. View abstract.

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CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version.
© Therapeutic Research Faculty 2018.