YARROW

OTHER NAME(S):

Achilee, Achillea, Achillea borealis, Achillea lanulosa, Achillea magna, Achillea millefolium, Achillée, Achillée Boréale, Achillée Laineuse, Achillée Millefeuille, Acuilee, Band Man's Plaything, Bauchweh, Birangasifa, Birangasipha, Biranjasipha, Bloodwort, Carpenter's Weed, Civan Percemi, Common Yarrow, Devil's Nettle, Devil's Plaything, Erba Da Cartentieri, Erba Da Falegname, Gandana, Gemeine Schafgarbe, Green Arrow, Herbe à la Coupure, Herbe à Dindes, Herbe aux Charpentiers, Herbe Militaire, Huile Essentielle d’Achillée, Katzenkrat, Milefolio, Milenrama, Milfoil Millefeuille, Millefolium, Millefolii Flos, Millefolii Herba, Millegoglie, Noble Yarrow, Nosebleed, Old Man's Pepper, Rajmari, Roga Mari, Sanguinary, Soldier's Wound Wort, Sourcil de Vénus, Staunchweed, Tausendaugbram, Thousand-Leaf, Wound Wort, Yarrow Essential Oil.<br/><br/>

Overview

Overview Information

Yarrow is an herb. The above ground parts are used to make medicine.

Yarrow is used for fever, common cold, hay fever, absence of menstruation, dysentery, diarrhea, loss of appetite, gastrointestinal (GI) tract discomfort, and to induce sweating.

Some people chew the fresh leaves to relieve toothache.

Yarrow is applied to the skin to stop bleeding from hemorrhoids; for wounds; and as a sitz bath for painful, lower pelvic, cramp-like conditions in women.

In combination with other herbs, yarrow is used for bloating, intestinal gas (flatulence), mild gastrointestinal (GI) cramping, and other GI complaints.

In foods, the young leaves and flowers of yarrow are used in salads.

In manufacturing, yarrow is also used as a cosmetic cleanser and in snuff. Yarrow oil is used in shampoos.

How does it work?

Yarrow contains many chemicals that might affect blood pressure and possibly have anti-inflammatory effects.

Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Insufficient Evidence for

More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of yarrow for these uses.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

Yarrow is LIKELY SAFE when taken by mouth in the amounts commonly found in food. However, yarrow products that contain thujone might not be safe.

Yarrow is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth in medicinal amounts. In some people, yarrow might cause drowsiness and increase urination when taken by mouth. When it comes in contact with the skin, yarrow might cause skin irritation.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Yarrow is LIKELY UNSAFE when taken by mouth during pregnancy as it can affect the menstrual cycle and might cause miscarriage. .

There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking yarrow if you are breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Bleeding disorder: Yarrow might slow blood clotting. In theory, taking yarrow might increase the risk of bleeding in people with bleeding disorders.

Allergy to ragweed and related plants: Yarrow may cause an allergic reaction in people who are sensitive to the Asteraceae/Compositae family. Members of this family include ragweed, chrysanthemums, marigolds, daisies, and many others. If you have allergies, be sure to check with your healthcare provider before taking yarrow.

Surgery: Yarrow might slow blood clotting so there is a concern that it might increase bleeding during and after surgery. Stop taking yarrow at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Interactions

Interactions?

Major Interaction

Do not take this combination

!
  • Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs) interacts with YARROW

    Large amounts of yarrow might slow blood clotting. Taking yarrow along with medications that also slow clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding.<br/><br/> Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen (Anaprox, Naprosyn, others), dalteparin (Fragmin), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin, warfarin (Coumadin), and others.

Moderate Interaction

Be cautious with this combination

!
  • Lithium interacts with YARROW

    Yarrow might have an effect like a water pill or "diuretic." Taking yarrow might decrease how well the body gets rid of lithium. This could increase how much lithium is in the body and result in serious side effects. Talk with your healthcare provider before using this product if you are taking lithium. Your lithium dose might need to be changed.

  • Sedative medications (Barbiturates) interacts with YARROW

    Yarrow might cause sleepiness and drowsiness. Medications that cause sleepiness are called sedatives. Taking yarrow along with sedative medications might cause too much sleepiness.

Minor Interaction

Be watchful with this combination

!
  • Antacids interacts with YARROW

    Antacids are used to decrease stomach acid. Yarrow may increase stomach acid. By increasing stomach acid, yarrow might decrease the effectiveness of antacids.<br/><br/> Some antacids include calcium carbonate (Tums, others), dihydroxyaluminum sodium carbonate (Rolaids, others), magaldrate (Riopan), magnesium sulfate (Bilagog), aluminum hydroxide (Amphojel), and others.

  • Medications that decrease stomach acid (H2-Blockers) interacts with YARROW

    Yarrow might increase stomach acid. By increasing stomach acid, yarrow might decrease the effectiveness of some medications that decrease stomach acid, called H2-Blockers.<br/><br/> Some medications that decrease stomach acid include cimetidine (Tagamet), ranitidine (Zantac), nizatidine (Axid), and famotidine (Pepcid).

  • Medications that decrease stomach acid (Proton pump inhibitors) interacts with YARROW

    Yarrow might increase stomach acid. By increasing stomach acid, yarrow might decrease the effectiveness of medications that are used to decrease stomach acid, called proton pump inhibitors.<br/><br/> Some medications that decrease stomach acid include omeprazole (Prilosec), lansoprazole (Prevacid), rabeprazole (Aciphex), pantoprazole (Protonix), and esomeprazole (Nexium).

Dosing

Dosing

The appropriate dose of yarrow depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for yarrow. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

View References

REFERENCES:

  • Boswell-Ruys, C. L., Ritchie, H. E., and Brown-Woodman, P. D. Preliminary screening study of reproductive outcomes after exposure to yarrow in the pregnant rat. Birth Defects Res B Dev.Reprod.Toxicol. 2003;68(5):416-420. View abstract.
  • Dutkiewicz, J., Krysinska-Traczyk, E., Skorska, C., Sitkowska, J., Prazmo, Z., and Golec, M. Exposure to airborne microorganisms and endotoxin in herb processing plants. Ann Agric.Environ.Med 2001;8(2):201-211. View abstract.
  • Final report on the safety assessment of Yarrow (Achillea millefolium) Extract. Int J Toxicol. 2001;20 Suppl 2:79-84. View abstract.
  • Guin, J. D. and Skidmore, G. Compositae dermatitis in childhood. Arch Dermatol. 1987;123(4):500-502. View abstract.
  • Hausen, B. M., Breuer, J., Weglewski, J., and Rucker, G. alpha-Peroxyachifolid and other new sensitizing sesquiterpene lactones from yarrow (Achillea millefolium L., Compositae). Contact Dermatitis 1991;24(4):274-280. View abstract.
  • Jovanovic, M., Poljacki, M., Duran, V., Vujanovic, L., Sente, R., and Stojanovic, S. Contact allergy to Compositae plants in patients with atopic dermatitis. Med Pregl. 2004;57(5-6):209-218. View abstract.
  • Molochko, V. A., Lastochkina, T. M., Krylov, I. A., and Brangulis, K. A. [The antistaphylococcal properties of plant extracts in relation to their prospective use as therapeutic and prophylactic formulations for the skin]. Vestn.Dermatol Venerol. 1990;(8):54-56. View abstract.
  • Schempp, C. M., Schopf, E., and Simon, J. C. [Plant-induced toxic and allergic dermatitis (phytodermatitis)]. Hautarzt 2002;53(2):93-97. View abstract.
  • Uter, W., Nohle, M., Randerath, B., and Schwanitz, H. J. Occupational contact urticaria and late-phase bronchial asthma caused by compositae pollen in a florist. Am J Contact Dermat. 2001;12(3):182-184. View abstract.
  • Van der Weijden, G. A., Timmer, C. J., Timmerman, M. F., Reijerse, E., Mantel, M. S., and van, der, V. The effect of herbal extracts in an experimental mouthrinse on established plaque and gingivitis. J Clin Periodontol. 1998;25(5):399-403. View abstract.
  • Electronic Code of Federal Regulations. Title 21. Part 182 -- Substances Generally Recognized As Safe. Available at: https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?CFRPart=182
  • Hausen BM. The sensitizing capacity of Compositae plants. III. Test results and cross-reactions in Compositae-sensitive patients. Dermatologica 1979;159:1-11. View abstract.

More Resources for YARROW

CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version. © Therapeutic Research Faculty 2009.