BUTANEDIOL (BD)

OTHER NAME(S):

1,4-BD, 1,4-butanediol, 1,4-butylene glycol, 1,4-dihydroxybutane, 1,4-tetramethylene glycol, 2(3H)-Furanone di-dihydro, BD, BDO, Butane-1,4-diol, Butanodiol, Butyl&egrave;neglycol, Butylene Glycol, Butyl&egrave;ne Glycol, Glycol Butylique, Tetramethylene Glycol, Tetramethylene-1,4-diol.<br/><br/>

Overview

Overview Information

Butanediol is a chemical that is used to make floor stripper, paint thinner, and other solvent products. It’s illegal to sell butanediol for use as medicine. Nevertheless, butanediol is sometimes used as a substitute for other illegal substances such as gamma butyrolactone (GBL) and gamma hydroxybutyrate (GHB). Unfortunately, butanediol is just as dangerous as GBL and GHB.

Butanediol has been used to stimulate growth hormone production and muscle growth; and for bodybuilding, weight loss, and trouble sleeping (insomnia).

How does it work?

Butanediol is converted to gamma hydroxybutyrate (GHB) in the body. GHB slows down the brain, which can cause loss of consciousness along with dangerous slowing of breathing and other vital functions. It also stimulates growth hormone secretion.

Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Insufficient Evidence for

More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of butanediol for these uses.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

Butanediol is UNSAFE when taken by mouth. It has caused serious illness and more than 100 deaths.

Some side effects of butanediol are serious breathing problems, coma, amnesia, combativeness, confusion, agitation, vomiting, seizures, and very slow heartbeat. People who use butanediol on a regular basis and then stop may experience withdrawal symptoms such as sleep problems (insomnia), tremor, and anxiety.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

While butanediol isn’t safe for anyone, some people are at even greater risk for serious side effects. Be especially careful not to take butanediol if you have any of the following conditions:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Butanediol is UNSAFE for both mother and infant. Don’t use it.

A heart rate that is too slow (bradycardia): Gamma hydroxybutyrate (GHB) is a chemical that is formed when the body breaks down butanediol. GHB can slow the heart and may make bradycardia worse in individuals who have this condition.

Epilepsy: Gamma hydroxybutyrate (GHB) is a chemical that is formed when the body breaks down butanediol. GHB can cause seizures and might make epilepsy worse.

High blood pressure: Gamma hydroxybutyrate (GHB) is a chemical that is formed when the body breaks down butanediol. GHB can raise blood pressure and might make high blood pressure worse.

Surgery: Butanediol can slow down the central nervous system (CNS). Anesthesia and some other medications used during surgery have the same effect. There is concern that using butanediol along with these other medications might slow down the CNS too much and cause extreme sleepiness. Stop using butanediol at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Interactions

Interactions?

Major Interaction

Do not take this combination

!
  • Amphetamines interacts with BUTANEDIOL (BD)

    Amphetamines are drugs that can speed up your nervous system. Butanediol is changed in the body to GHB (gamma hydroxybutyrate). GHB can slow down your nervous system. Taking butanediol along with amphetamines can lead to serious side effects.

  • Medications for mental conditions (Antipsychotic drugs) interacts with BUTANEDIOL (BD)

    Butanediol can affect the brain. Medications for mental conditions also affect the brain. Taking butanediol along with medications for mental conditions might increase the effects and serious side effects of butanediol. Do not take butanediol if you are taking medications for a mental condition.<br><nb>Some of these medications include fluphenazine (Permitil, Prolixin), haloperidol (Haldol), chlorpromazine (Thorazine), prochlorperazine (Compazine), thioridazine (Mellaril), trifluoperazine (Stelazine), and others.

  • Medications for pain (Narcotic drugs) interacts with BUTANEDIOL (BD)

    Some medications for pain can cause sleepiness and drowsiness. Butanediol might also cause sleepiness and drowsiness. Taking butanediol along with some medications for pain might cause severe side effects. Do not take butanediol if you are taking medications for pain.<br><nb>Some medications for pain include meperidine (Demerol), hydrocodone, morphine, OxyContin, and many others.

  • Sedative medications (Benzodiazepines) interacts with BUTANEDIOL (BD)

    Butanediol might cause sleepiness and drowsiness. Medications that cause sleepiness and drowsiness are called sedatives. Taking butanediol along with sedative medications might cause serious side effects. Do not take butanediol if you are taking sedative medications.<br><nb>Some of these sedative medications include clonazepam (Klonopin), diazepam (Valium), lorazepam (Ativan), and others.

  • Sedative medications (CNS depressants) interacts with BUTANEDIOL (BD)

    Butanediol might cause sleepiness and drowsiness. Medications that cause sleepiness are called sedatives. Taking butanediol along with sedative medications might cause serious side effects. Do not take butanediol if you are taking sedative medications.<br><nb>Some sedative medications include clonazepam (Klonopin), lorazepam (Ativan), phenobarbital (Donnatal), zolpidem (Ambien), and others.

Moderate Interaction

Be cautious with this combination

!
  • Alcohol interacts with BUTANEDIOL (BD)

    Alcohol can cause sleepiness and drowsiness. Taking butanediol along with alcohol might greatly increase sleepiness and drowsiness caused by alcohol. Taking butanediol along with alcohol can lead to serious side effects. Do not take butanediol if you have been drinking.

  • Haloperidol (Haldol) interacts with BUTANEDIOL (BD)

    Butanediol can affect the brain. Haloperidol (Haldol) can also affect the brain. Taking haloperidol (Haldol) along with butanediol might cause serious side effects.

  • Medications used to prevent seizures (Anticonvulsants) interacts with BUTANEDIOL (BD)

    Medications used to prevent seizures affect chemicals in the brain. Butanediol is changed in the body to one of these brain chemicals called GABA. Taking butanediol along with medications used to prevent seizures might decrease the effects of butanediol.<br><nb>Some medications used to prevent seizures include phenobarbital, primidone (Mysoline), valproic acid (Depakene), gabapentin (Neurontin), carbamazepine (Tegretol), phenytoin (Dilantin), and others.

  • Muscle relaxants interacts with BUTANEDIOL (BD)

    Muscle relaxants can cause drowsiness. Butanediol can also cause drowsiness. Taking butanediol along with muscle relaxants might cause too much drowsiness and serious side effects. Do not take butanediol if you are taking muscle relaxants.<br><nb>Some of these muscle relaxants include carisoprodol (Soma), pipecuronium (Arduan), orphenadrine (Banflex, Disipal), cyclobenzaprine, gallamine (Flaxedil), atracurium (Tracrium), pancuronium (Pavulon), succinylcholine (Anectine), and others.

  • Naloxone (Narcan) interacts with BUTANEDIOL (BD)

    Butanediol is changed by the body to another chemical. This chemical is called GHB. GHB can affect the brain. Taking naloxone (Narcan) along with butanediol might decrease the effects of butanediol on the brain.

  • Ritonavir (Norvir) interacts with BUTANEDIOL (BD)

    Ritonavir (Norvir) and saquinavir (Fortovase, Invirase) are commonly used together for HIV/AIDS. Taking both these medications plus butanediol might decrease how quickly the body gets rid of butanediol. This could cause serious side effects.

  • Saquinavir (Fortovase, Invirase) interacts with BUTANEDIOL (BD)

    Saquinavir (Fortovase, Invirase) and ritonavir (Norvir) are commonly used together for HIV/AIDS. Taking both these medications plus butanediol might decrease how fast the body gets rid of butanediol. This could cause serious side effects.

Dosing

Dosing

The appropriate dose of butanediol (BD) depends on several factors such as the user’s age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for butanediol (BD). Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

View References

REFERENCES:

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CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

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