ASAFOETIDA

OTHER NAME(S):

A Wei, Asafétida, Ase Fétide, Assant, Crotte du Diable, Devil's Dung, Ferula Asafoetida, Ferula Assa Foetida, Ferula assa-foetida, Ferula foetida, Ferula pseudalliacea, Ferula rubricaulis, Férule, Férule Persique, Food of the Gods, Fum, Giant Fennel, Heeng, Hing.<br/><br/>

Overview

Overview Information

Asafoetida is a plant that has a bad smell and tastes bitter. It is sometimes called "devil's dung."

People use asafoetida resin, a gum-like material, as medicine. Asafoetida resin is produced by solidifying juice that comes out of cuts made in the plant's living roots.

People use asafoetida for conditions such as breathing or throat problems, digestion problems, or by women to restart their menstrual periods after menstruation has stopped for some reason. Asafoetida is also sometimes applied directly to the skin for corns and calluses, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these uses.

In manufacturing, asafoetida is used as a fragrance in cosmetics and as a flavoring ingredient in foods and beverages. Asafoetida is also used in products meant to repel dogs, cats, and wildlife.

How does it work?

There is some scientific evidence that the chemicals in asafoetida might help treat irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and also might protect against high blood levels of certain fats including cholesterol and triglycerides. Chemicals called coumarins in asafoetida can thin the blood.

Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Insufficient Evidence for

  • Asthma.
  • Bronchitis.
  • Convulsions.
  • Corns and calluses.
  • Hysteria.
  • Intestinal gas.
  • Irritable colon.
  • Menstrual problems.
  • Nerve disorders.
  • Stomach upset.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of asafoetida for these uses.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

When taken by mouth: Asafoetida is LIKELY SAFE for most people in the amounts typically found in foods. There is some evidence that asafoetida is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth as medicine. It might cause swelling of the lips, burping, intestinal gas, diarrhea, headache, convulsions, blood disorders, and other side effects.

When applied to the skin: There isn't enough reliable information to know if asafoetida is safe or what the side effects might be.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: It is LIKELY UNSAFE to take asafoetida by mouth if you are pregnant. It might cause a miscarriage. Avoid use.

It is UNSAFE to take asafoetida by mouth if you are breastfeeding. The chemicals in asafoetida could pass into breast milk and cause blood disorders in the nursing infant. Avoid use.

Children: Asafoetida is UNSAFE for infants when taken by mouth because it might cause certain blood disorders.

Bleeding disorders: There is concern that asafoetida might increase the risk of bleeding. Don't use asafoetida if you have a bleeding disorder.

Epilepsy or history of convulsions: Don't use asafoetida if you have epilepsy or some other central nervous system condition that might lead to seizures or convulsions.

Stomach and intestinal (gastrointestinal, GI) problems: Asafoetida can irritate the GI tract. Don't use it of you have a GI infection or other GI condition.

High blood pressure (hypertension) or low blood pressure (hypotension): There is some concern that asafoetida might interfere with blood pressure control. Avoid use if you have a blood pressure problem.

Surgery: Asafoetida might slow blood clotting. There is concern that asafoetida might increase the risk of bleeding during and after surgery. Stop taking asafoetida at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Interactions

Interactions?

Moderate Interaction

Be cautious with this combination

!
  • Medications for high blood pressure (Antihypertensive drugs) interacts with ASAFOETIDA

    Asafoetida seems to decrease blood pressure. Taking asafoetida along with medications for high blood pressure might cause your blood pressure to go too low.<br><nb>Some medications for high blood pressure include captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec), losartan (Cozaar), valsartan (Diovan), diltiazem (Cardizem), Amlodipine (Norvasc), hydrochlorothiazide (HydroDiuril), furosemide (Lasix), and many others.

  • Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs) interacts with ASAFOETIDA

    Asafoetida might slow blood clotting. Taking asafoetida along with medications that also slow clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding.<br><nb>Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen (Anaprox, Naprosyn, others), dalteparin (Fragmin), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin, warfarin (Coumadin), and others.

Dosing

Dosing

The appropriate dose of asafoetida depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for asafoetida. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

View References

REFERENCES:

  • Abd El-Razek, M. H., Ohta, S., Ahmed, A. A., and Hirata, T. Sesquiterpene coumarins from the roots of Ferula assa-foetida. Phytochemistry 2001;58(8):1289-1295. View abstract.
  • Appendino, G., Maxia, L., Bascope, M., Houghton, P. J., Sanchez-Duffhues, G., Munoz, E., and Sterner, O. A meroterpenoid NF-kappaB inhibitor and drimane sesquiterpenoids from Asafetida. J Nat Prod. 2006;69(7):1101-1104. View abstract.
  • Duan, H., Takaishi, Y., Tori, M., Takaoka, S., Honda, G., Ito, M., Takeda, Y., Kodzhimatov, O. K., Kodzhimatov, K., and Ashurmetov, O. Polysulfide derivatives from Ferula foetida. J Nat Prod. 2002;65(11):1667-1669. View abstract.
  • Fatehi, M., Farifteh, F., and Fatehi-Hassanabad, Z. Antispasmodic and hypotensive effects of Ferula asafoetida gum extract. J Ethnopharmacol 2004;91(2-3):321-324. View abstract.
  • Singh, U. P., Singh, D. P., Maurya, S., Maheshwari, R., Singh, M., Dubey, R. S., and Singh, R. B. Investigation on the phenolics of some spices having pharmacotherapeuthic properties. J Herb.Pharmacother. 2004;4(4):27-42. View abstract.
  • Electronic Code of Federal Regulations. Title 21. Part 182 -- Substances Generally Recognized As Safe. Available at: https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?CFRPart=182

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CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version.
© Therapeutic Research Faculty 2018.