IBOGA

OTHER NAME(S):

Bois Sacré, Eboka, Tabernanthe iboga.<br/><br/>

Overview

Overview Information

Iboga is an herb. It is used for ritual and ceremonial purposes in some African cultures. The root of the plant is also used as medicine.

People take iboga for fever, influenza (the flu), swine flu, high blood pressure, HIV/AIDS, and nerve disorders. They also take it for preventing fatigue and drowsiness, for increasing sex drive, for fighting substance abuse and addictions, and as a general tonic.

How does it work?

Iboga contains chemicals that can cause brain stimulation.

Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Insufficient Evidence for

More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of iboga for these uses.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

There isn’t enough information to know if iboga is safe for use. Iboga can cause side effects such as low blood pressure, slow heart rate, seizures, paralysis, difficulty breathing, anxiety, and hallucinations.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of iboga during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Interactions

Interactions?

Moderate Interaction

Be cautious with this combination

!
  • Drying medications (Anticholinergic drugs) interacts with IBOGA

    Iboga contains chemicals that can affect the brain and heart. Some of these drying medications called anticholinergic drugs can also affect the brain and heart. But iboga works differently than drying medications. Iboga might decrease the effects of drying medications.<br><nb>Some of these drying medications include atropine, scopolamine, and some medications used for allergies (antihistamines), and for depression (antidepressants).

  • Various medications used for glaucoma, Alzheimer's disease, and other conditions (Cholinergic drugs) interacts with IBOGA

    Iboga contains a chemical that affects the body. This chemical is similar to some medications used for glaucoma, Alzheimer's disease, and other conditions. Taking iboga with these medications might increase the chance of side effects.<br><nb>Some of these medications used for glaucoma, Alzheimer's disease, and other conditions include pilocarpine (Pilocar and others), donepezil (Aricept), tacrine (Cognex), and others.

Dosing

Dosing

The appropriate dose of iboga depends on several factors such as the user’s age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for iboga. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

View References

REFERENCES:

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  • Glue P, Winter H, Garbe K, et al. Influence of CYP2D6 activity on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of a single 20?mg dose of ibogaine in healthy volunteers. J Clin Pharmacol. 2015;55(6):680-7. View abstract.
  • Henstra M, Wong L, Chahbouni A, et al. Toxicokinetics of ibogaine and noribogaine in a patient with prolonged multiple cardiac arrhythmias after ingestion of internet purchased ibogaine. Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2017;55(6):600-602. View abstract.
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  • Mazoyer C, Carlier J, Boucher A, Péoc'h M, Lemeur C, Gaillard Y. Fatal case of a 27-year-old male after taking iboga in withdrawal treatment: GC-MS/MS determination of ibogaine and ibogamine in iboga roots and postmortem biological material. J Forensic Sci. 2013;58(6):1666-72. View abstract.
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  • Sheppard SG. A preliminary investigation of ibogaine: case reports and recommendations for further study. J Subst Abuse Treat. 1994 Jul-Aug;11(4):379-85. View abstract.
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More Resources for IBOGA

CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

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