MARJORAM

OTHER NAME(S):

Essence de Marjolaine, Garden Marjoram, Gartenmajoran, Huile de Marjolaine, Knotted Marjoram, Maggiorana, Majoran, Majorana Aetheroleum Oil, Majorana Herb, Majorana hortensis, Majorana majorana, Marjolaine, Marjolaine des Jardins, Marjolaine Ordinaire, Marjolein, Marjoram Essential Oil, Marjoram Oil, Marubaka, Marwa, Mejorana, Mejram, Origan des Jardins, Origan Marjolaine, Origanum majorana, Sweet Marjoram.<br/><br/>

Overview

Overview Information

Marjoram is an herb. People make medicine from marjoram’s flowers, leaves, and oil.

Marjoram is commonly used for runny nose, coughs, colds, infections, and various digestion problems, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these or any other uses.

In foods, marjoram herb and oil are used as flavorings.

In manufacturing, the oil is used as a fragrance in soaps, cosmetics, lotions, and perfumes.

Don't confuse marjoram with winter marjoram or oregano (Origanum vulgare), which is also referred to as wild marjoram.

How does it work?

There isn't enough information to know how marjoram might work.

Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Insufficient Evidence for

  • Asthma. Early research shows that taking 2 drops of marjoram oil daily along with asthma medication for 3 months might improve lung function in people with asthma better than taking asthma medication alone.
  • Painful menstrual cramps (dysmenorrhea). Early research suggests that massaging a cream containing lavender, clary sage, and marjoram essential oils to the abdomen may reduce pain in some women with painful menstrual cramps. The effect of marjoram essential oil alone on menstrual cramps is unclear.
  • A condition of the ovaries known as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Early research suggests that drinking marjoram leaf tea might improve some chemical markers of PCOS, but overall it does not seem to improve body weight, blood sugar, or levels of certain hormones in women with PCOS.
  • Coughs.
  • Colds.
  • Stomach cramps.
  • Liver problems.
  • Gallstones.
  • Headache.
  • Diabetes.
  • Menopause symptoms.
  • Nerve pain.
  • Muscle pain.
  • Sprains.
  • Improving appetite and digestion.
  • Improving sleep.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of marjoram for these uses.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

Marjoram is LIKELY SAFE in food amounts and POSSIBLY SAFE for most adults when taken by mouth in medicinal amounts for short periods of time.

Marjoram is POSSIBLY UNSAFE when used long-term. There is some concern that marjoram could harm the liver and kidneys orcause cancer if used long-term.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: It is POSSIBLY UNSAFE to use marjoram in medicinal amounts if you are pregnant. It might start your period, and that could threaten the pregnancy.

Not enough is known about the safety of using marjoram in medicinal amounts if you are breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Children: Do not give marjoram to children in medicinal amounts. It is POSSIBLY UNSAFE for them.

Bleeding disorders: Taking medicinal amounts of marjoram might slow clotting and increase the chances of bruising and bleeding in people with bleeding disorders.

Allergy to basil, hyssop, lavender, mint, oregano, and sage: Marjoram can cause allergic reactions in people allergic to these plants and other members of the Lamiaceae family of plants.

Surgery: Taking medicinal amounts of marjoram might increase the risk of bleeding during and after surgery. Stop using marjoram medicinally at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Interactions

Interactions?

Moderate Interaction

Be cautious with this combination

!
  • Lithium interacts with MARJORAM

    Marjoram might have an effect like a water pill or "diuretic." Taking marjoram might decrease how well the body gets rid of lithium. This could increase how much lithium is in the body and result in serious side effects. Talk with your healthcare provider before using this product if you are taking lithium. Your lithium dose might need to be changed.

Dosing

Dosing

The appropriate dose of marjoram depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for marjoram. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

View References

REFERENCES:

  • Al Howiriny, T., Alsheikh, A., Alqasoumi, S., Al Yahya, M., ElTahir, K., and Rafatullah, S. Protective Effect of Origanum majorana L. 'Marjoram' on various models of gastric mucosal injury in rats. Am.J.Chin Med. 2009;37(3):531-545. View abstract.
  • Chung, Y. K., Heo, H. J., Kim, E. K., Kim, H. K., Huh, T. L., Lim, Y., Kim, S. K., and Shin, D. H. Inhibitory effect of ursolic acid purified from Origanum majorana L on the acetylcholinesterase. Mol.Cells 4-30-2001;11(2):137-143. View abstract.
  • Etienne JJ. Putting oils to the test. Soap, Perfumery and Cosmetics (England). 1997;70:45-46.
  • Farkas, J. Perioral dermatitis from marjoram, bay leaf and cinnamon. Contact Dermatitis 1981;7(2):121. View abstract.
  • Lamien-Meda, A., Lukas, B., Schmiderer, C., Franz, C., and Novak, J. Validation of a quantitative assay of arbutin using gas chromatography in Origanum majorana and Arctostaphylos uva-ursi extracts. Phytochem.Anal. 2009;20(5):416-420. View abstract.
  • Leeja, L. and Thoppil, J. E. Antimicrobial activity of methanol extract of Origanum majorana L. (Sweet marjoram). J Environ.Biol 2007;28(1):145-146. View abstract.
  • Mohamed MS, Saad HH, and Abd El Khalek MG. Daily consumption of marjoram oil improve the health status of patients with asthma. Pakistan Journal of Nutrition. 2008;7(2):312-316.
  • Orhan, I., Kartal, M., Kan, Y., and Sener, B. Activity of essential oils and individual components against acetyl- and butyrylcholinesterase. Z.Naturforsch.C. 2008;63(7-8):547-553. View abstract.
  • Ou, M. C., Hsu, T. F., Lai, A. C., Lin, Y. T., and Lin, C. C. Pain relief assessment by aromatic essential oil massage on outpatients with primary dysmenorrhea: a randomized, double-blind clinical trial. J Obstet.Gynaecol.Res 2012;38(5):817-822. View abstract.
  • Ozbayer, C., Degirmenci, I., and Kurt, H. Antioxidant and free radical-scavenging properties of Stevia rebaudiana (Bertoni) extracts and L-NNA in streptozotocine-nicotinamide induced diabetic rat liver [Turkish]. Turkiye Klinikleri Journal of Medical Sciences 2011;31(1):51-60.
  • Petr, J., Vitkova, K., Ranc, V., Znaleziona, J., Maier, V., Knob, R., and Sevcik, J. Determination of some phenolic acids in Majorana hortensis by capillary electrophoresis with online electrokinetic preconcentration. J.Agric.Food Chem. 6-11-2008;56(11):3940-3944. View abstract.
  • Rau, O., Wurglics, M., Dingermann, T., Abdel-Tawab, M., and Schubert-Zsilavecz, M. Screening of herbal extracts for activation of the human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor. Pharmazie 2006;61(11):952-956. View abstract.
  • Rodrigues, M. R., Caramao, E. B., Arce, L., Rios, A., and Valcarcel, M. Determination of monoterpene hydrocarbons and alcohols in Majorana hortensis Moench by micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatographic. J Agric Food Chem 7-17-2002;50(15):4215-4220. View abstract.
  • Sarer, E., Scheffer, J. J., and Baerheim, Svendsen A. Monoterpenes in the Essential Oil of Origanum majorana. Planta Med 1982;46(12):236-239. View abstract.
  • Vagi, E., Rapavi, E., Hadolin, M., Vasarhelyine, Peredi K., Balazs, A., Blazovics, A., and Simandi, B. Phenolic and triterpenoid antioxidants from Origanum majorana L. herb and extracts obtained with different solvents. J Agric Food Chem 1-12-2005;53(1):17-21. View abstract.
  • Yazdanparast, R. and Shahriyary, L. Comparative effects of Artemisia dracunculus, Satureja hortensis and Origanum majorana on inhibition of blood platelet adhesion, aggregation and secretion. Vascul.Pharmacol 2008;48(1):32-37. View abstract.
  • Anderson C, Lis-Balchin M, Kirk-Smith M. Evaluation of massage with essential oils on childhood atopic eczema. Phytother Res 2000;14(6):452-6. View abstract.
  • Benito M, Jorro G, Morales C, et al. Labiatae allergy: systemic reactions due to ingestion of oregano and thyme. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 1996;76:416-8. View abstract.
  • Bina F, Rahimi R. Sweet marjoram: a review of ethnopharmacology, phytochemistry, and biological activities. J Evid Based Complementary Altern Med 2017;22(1):175-85. View abstract.
  • Electronic Code of Federal Regulations. Title 21. Part 182 -- Substances Generally Recognized As Safe. Available at: https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?CFRPart=182
  • Fetrow CW, Avila JR. Professional's Handbook of Complementary & Alternative Medicines. 1st ed. Springhouse, PA: Springhouse Corp., 1999.
  • Haj-Husein I, Tukan S, Alkazaleh F. The effect of marjoram (Origanum majorana) tea on the hormonal profile of women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a randomized controlled pilot study. J Hum Nutr Diet 2016;29(1):105-11. View abstract.
  • Klekamp BG, Bodager D, Matthews SD. Use of surveillance systems in detection of a ciguatera fish poisoning outbreak - Orange cCounty, Florida, 2014. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2015;64(40):1142-4. View abstract.
  • Okazaki, K., Nakayama, S., Kawazoe, K., Takaishi, Y. 1998. Antiaggregant effects on human platelets of culinary herbs. Phytother Res 1998;12(8):603-5.
  • Waller SB, Madrid IM, Hoffmann JF, et al. Chemical composition and cytotoxicity of extracts of marjoram and rosemary and their activity against Sporothrix brasiliensis. J Med Microbiol 2017;66(7):1076-83. View abstract.

More Resources for MARJORAM

CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version.
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