Overview

Marjoram is an herb. People make medicine from the flowers, leaves, and oil.

Marjoram is commonly used for runny nose, cough, common cold, other infections, and various digestion problems, but there is no good scientific evidence to support any use.

In foods, marjoram herb and oil are used as flavorings. In manufacturing, the oil is used as a fragrance in soaps, cosmetics, lotions, and perfumes.

Don't confuse marjoram with oregano (Origanum vulgare), which is also referred to as winter marjoram or wild marjoram.

How does it work ?

There isn't enough information to know how marjoram might work.

Uses & Effectiveness ?

We currently have no information for MARJORAM overview.

Side Effects

When taken by mouth: Marjoram is LIKELY SAFE in food amounts. It is POSSIBLY SAFE for most adults when taken in larger amounts as medicine for short periods of time. Marjoram is POSSIBLY UNSAFE when used long-term. There is some concern that marjoram could harm the liver and kidneys or cause cancer if used long-term.

When applied to the skin: There isn't enough reliable information to know if marjoram is safe. Some people are allergic to marjoram.

Special Precautions and Warnings

When taken by mouth: Marjoram is LIKELY SAFE in food amounts. It is POSSIBLY SAFE for most adults when taken in larger amounts as medicine for short periods of time. Marjoram is POSSIBLY UNSAFE when used long-term. There is some concern that marjoram could harm the liver and kidneys or cause cancer if used long-term.

When applied to the skin: There isn't enough reliable information to know if marjoram is safe. Some people are allergic to marjoram. Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Marjoram is POSSIBLY UNSAFE in medicinal amounts when pregnant. It might start your period, and that could threaten the pregnancy. There isn't enough reliable information to know if marjoram is safe to use when breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and stick to food amounts.

Bleeding disorders: Taking medicinal amounts of marjoram might slow clotting and increase the chances of bruising and bleeding in people with bleeding disorders.

Slow heart rate: Marjoram might slow the heart rate. This might be a problem for people who already have a slow heart rate. If you have this condition, use marjoram cautiously.

Allergy to basil, hyssop, lavender, mint, oregano, and sage: Marjoram can cause allergic reactions in people allergic to these plants and other members of the Lamiaceae family of plants.

Gastrointestinal (GI) tract blockage: There is a concern that using marjoram might make GI blockage worse. That is because marjoram can increase mucous and fluid secretions in the intestine, causing "congestion". If you have a GI tract blockage, check with your healthcare provider before you use marjoram.

Stomach ulcers: There is a concern that using marjoram might make stomach ulcers worse. That is because marjoram can increase mucous and fluid secretions in the stomach and intestine, causing "congestion". If you have stomach ulcers, check with your healthcare provider before you use marjoram.

Lung conditions such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): There is a concern that using marjoram might make asthma or COPD worse. That is because marjoram can increase mucous and fluid secretions in the lung, causing "congestion". If you have asthma or COPD, check with your healthcare provider before you use marjoram.

Seizure disorder (epilepsy): Since marjoram seems to affect brain chemicals, there is concern that it might make epilepsy worse. If you have a seizure disorder such as epilepsy, use marjoram cautiously.

Surgery: Taking medicinal amounts of marjoram might increase the risk of bleeding during and after surgery. Stop using marjoram medicinally at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Urinary tract or reproductive system blockage: There is a concern that using marjoram might make blockage of the urinary or reproductive system worse. That is because marjoram can increase mucous and fluid secretions in these organs, causing "congestion". If you have a urinary tract or reproductive system blockage, check with your healthcare provider before you use marjoram.

Interactions ?

    Moderate Interaction

    Be cautious with this combination

  • Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs) interacts with MARJORAM

    When taken in medicinal amounts, marjoram might slow blood clotting. Taking marjoram along with medications that also slow clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding.

    Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen (Anaprox, Naprosyn, others), dalteparin (Fragmin), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin, warfarin (Coumadin), and others.

  • Drying medications (Anticholinergic drugs) interacts with MARJORAM

    Marjoram might affect the brain and heart. Some drying medications called anticholinergic drugs can also affect the brain and heart. Marjoram might decrease the effects of drying medications.

    Some drying medications include atropine, benztropine (Cogentin), biperiden (Akineton), procyclidine (Kemadrin), scopolamine, trihexyphenidyl (Artane), and some medications used for allergies (antihistamines), and for depression (antidepressants).

  • Various medications used for glaucoma, Alzheimer disease, and other conditions (Cholinergic drugs) interacts with MARJORAM

    When taken in medicinal amounts, marjoram might increase certain chemicals in the brain, heart, and elsewhere in the body. Some medications used for Alzheimer disease and other conditions also affect these chemicals. Taking marjoram along with these medications might increase the chance of side effects.

    Some medications used for glaucoma, Alzheimer disease and other conditions, include bethanechol (Urecholine), donepezil (Aricept), echothiophate (Phospholine Iodide), edrophonium (Enlon, Reversol, Tensilon), neostigmine (Prostigmin), physostigmine (Antilirium), pyridostigmine (Mestinon, Regonol), succinylcholine (Anectine, Quelicin), and tacrine (Cognex).

Dosing

The appropriate dose of marjoram depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for marjoram. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.
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CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version.
© Therapeutic Research Faculty 2020.