ANISE

OTHER NAME(S):

Anis, Anís, Anis Vert, Aniseed, Anise Essential Oil, Anise Oil, Anisi Fructus, Dohn-e-Anisoon, Graine d'Anis Vert, Green Anise, Huile Essentielle d'Anis, Phytoestrogen, Phyto-Œstrogène, Pimpinella anisum, Pinella, Semen Anisi, Shatpushpa, Sweet Cumin, Velaiti Saunf.

Overview

Overview Information

Anise is an herb. The seed and oil are used to make medicine. Less commonly, the root and leaf are used to make medicine as well. Do not confuse anise with other herbs called star anise or fennel. These are sometimes called anise.

Anise is most commonly used for indigestion (dyspepsia) and a long-term disorder of the large intestines that causes stomach pain (irritable bowel syndrome or IBS). It is also used for many other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support most of these uses.

In foods, anise is used as a flavoring agent. It has a sweet, aromatic taste that resembles the taste of black licorice. It is commonly used in alcohols and liqueurs, such as anisette and ouzo. Anise is also used in dairy products, gelatins, meats, candies, and breath fresheners.

In manufacturing, anise is often used as a fragrance in soap, creams, perfumes, and sachets.

How does it work?

There are chemicals in anise that may have estrogen-like effects. Chemicals in anise may also act as insecticides and decrease swelling or inflammation.

Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Possibly Effective for

  • Indigestion (dyspepsia). Some research shows that taking anise powder daily for 4 weeks reduces stomach discomfort, bloating, and pain following a meal in people who have indigestion after eating.
  • A long-term disorder of the large intestines that causes stomach pain (irritable bowel syndrome or IBS). Some research shows that taking a capsule containing anise oil daily reduces pain and bloating in people with IBS.

Insufficient Evidence for

  • Asthma. Early research shows that drinking one cup of a tea containing anise and multiple other ingredients reduces coughing and sleep discomfort in people with allergic asthma.
  • Constipation. Early research shows that drinking an herbal tea containing anise, fennel, elderberry, and senna daily for 5 days improves constipation in some people.
  • Depression. Some research shows that taking a capsule containing anise oil daily for 4 weeks improves feelings of depression in people with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).
  • Diabetes. Early research shows that taking anise seed powder daily for 2 months lowers blood sugar levels in people with diabetes.
  • Lice. Early research shows that applying a spray containing anise oil, coconut oil, and ylang ylang oil to the scalp helps to get rid of head lice. The effect of this combination spray appears to be comparable to a spray containing the chemicals permethrin, malathion, piperonyl, butoxide, and isododecane.
  • Symptoms of menopause. Early research shows that taking anise seed extract daily for 4 weeks reduces how often menopausal women get hot flashes.
  • Migraine. Some early evidence shows that applying a cream containing anise oil to the forehead area at the start of a migraine might improve the headache by a small amount. But people in this study could smell the anise cream. It is not clear if this effect is due to applying the cream to the forehead, to the smell of the cream, or to a "placebo effect."
  • Starting menstrual periods.
  • Increasing breast milk.
  • Increasing sex drive.
  • Scabies.
  • Psoriasis.
  • Coughs.
  • Spasms.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of anise for these uses.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

When taken by mouth: Anise is LIKELY SAFE for most adults when taken in amounts typically found in foods. Anise powder and oil are POSSIBLY SAFE when taken as medicine for up to 4 weeks.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Anise is LIKELY SAFE for pregnant and breast-feeding women when used as part of a normal diet. There isn't enough reliable information to know if anise is safe to use in larger medicinal amounts when pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and stick to food amounts.

Children: Anise is LIKELY SAFE for most children when taken by mouth in amounts typically found in foods. There isn't enough reliable information to know if anise is safe for children to use in medicinal amounts.

Allergies: Anise might cause allergic reactions in some people who are allergic to other plants that are similar to anise. Plants that are similar to anise include asparagus, caraway, celery, coriander, cumin, dill, and fennel.

Diabetes: Anise might lower blood sugar. Watch for signs of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and monitor your blood sugar carefully if you have diabetes and use anise.

Hormone-sensitive condition such as breast cancer, uterine cancer, ovarian cancer, endometriosis, or uterine fibroids: Anise might act like estrogen. If you have any condition that might be made worse by exposure to estrogen, don't use anise.

Surgery: Anise might lower blood sugar levels. There is some concern that it might interfere with blood sugar control during and after surgery. Stop using anise at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Interactions

Interactions?

Moderate Interaction

Be cautious with this combination

!
  • Birth control pills (Contraceptive drugs) interacts with ANISE

    Some birth control pills contain estrogen. Anise might have some of the same effects as estrogen. But anise isn't as strong as the estrogen in birth control pills. Taking anise along with birth control pills might decrease the effectiveness of birth control pills. If you take birth control pills along with anise, use an additional form of birth control such as a condom.
    Some birth control pills include ethinyl estradiol and levonorgestrel (Triphasil), ethinyl estradiol and norethindrone (Ortho-Novum 1/35, Ortho-Novum 7/7/7), and others.

  • Estrogens interacts with ANISE

    Large amounts of anise might have some of the same effects as estrogen. But large amounts of anise aren't as strong as estrogen pills. Taking anise along with estrogen pills might decrease the effects of estrogen pills.
    Some estrogen pills include conjugated equine estrogens (Premarin), ethinyl estradiol, estradiol, and others.

  • Tamoxifen (Nolvadex) interacts with ANISE

    Some types of cancer are affected by hormones in the body. Estrogen-sensitive cancers are cancers that are affected by estrogen levels in the body. Tamoxifen (Nolvadex) is used to help treat and prevent these types of cancer. Anise seems to also affect estrogen levels in the body. By affecting estrogen in the body, anise might decrease the effectiveness of tamoxifen (Nolvadex). Do not take anise if you are taking tamoxifen (Nolvadex).

Dosing

Dosing

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY MOUTH:

  • For indigestion (dyspepsia): 9 grams of anise powder daily for 4 weeks.
  • For a long-term disorder of the large intestines that causes stomach pain (irritable bowel syndrome or IBS): 200 mg of anise oil in a special, coated capsule, taken three times daily for 4 weeks.

View References

REFERENCES:

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CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

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