Overview

Burning bush is a plant. People use the leaves and roots to make medicine.

Burning bush is used for digestive tract disorders including cramps, stomach problems, and worms in the intestines. It is also used for urinary tract and genital tract disorders.

Women take burning bush to start menstruation, as birth control, and to help force out the placenta after childbirth.

Other uses include treating epilepsy, spasms, fluid retention, and baldness; liver disease (hepatitis); and use as a stimulant or tonic.

Some people apply burning bush directly to the affected area (topically) for treating skin disorders such as wounds, eczema, bacterial infection (impetigo), swelling (inflammation), and an infection (scabies) caused by tiny lice-like insects; as well as for painful conditions such as joint pain caused by arthritis or rheumatism. Other topical uses include treatment of fever; excessive uterine bleeding; use as a sedative for adults and children; and use as a tonic.

Don’t confuse this plant with wahoo, which is also referred to as burning bush. One of the ways to tell the difference is that this burning bush has a distinctive lemon or cinnamon scent, and its oil burns easily.

How does it work ?

There isn’t enough information about burning bush to know how it might work.

View References

CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version.
© Therapeutic Research Faculty 2020.