CUMIN

OTHER NAME(S):

Anis Âcre, Comino, Cumin de Malte, Cuminum cyminum, Cuminum odorum, Cummin, Green Cumin, Jeeraka, Svetajiraka, Zira.

Overview

Overview Information

Cumin is an herb. The seeds of the plant are used to make medicine.

People use cumin for many conditions, including abnormal levels of cholesterol or blood fats (dyslipidemia), obesity, and many others, but there is little scientific evidence to support these uses.

In spices, foods, and beverages, cumin is used as a flavoring component.

In other manufacturing processes, cumin oil is used as a fragrance in cosmetics.

How does it work?

It's not known how cumin might work on the conditions for which people use it.

Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Insufficient Evidence for

  • Abnormal levels of cholesterol or blood fats (dyslipidemia). Some research shows that taking cumin might help to lower levels of cholesterol or blood fats. However, since most research has been done in people with normal levels of cholesterol or blood fats, it is not clear if cumin would be helpful for people with dyslipidemia.
  • High levels of fats called triglycerides in the blood (hypertriglyceridemia). Some research shows that taking cumin might lower levels of cholesterol in people with hypertriglyceridemia. However, it doesn't seem to lower levels of triglycerides.
  • Obesity. Some research suggests that taking cumin might improve weight loss by a small amount in obese adults.
  • Diarrhea.
  • Colic.
  • Gas.
  • Bowel spasms.
  • Fluid retention.
  • Menstrual problems.
  • Increasing sexual desire.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of cumin for these uses.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

When taken by mouth: Cumin is LIKELY SAFE when taken in food amounts. It is POSSIBLY SAFE to take cumin powder and cumin essential oil in appropriate medicinal amounts. The side effects of cumin are not known, although some people can be allergic to it.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There isn't enough reliable information to know if cumin is safe to use as a medicine when pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and stick to food amounts.

Bleeding disorders. Cumin might slow blood clotting. In theory, cumin might make bleeding disorders worse.

Diabetes. Cumin might lower blood sugar levels in some people. Watch for signs of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and monitor your blood sugar carefully if you have diabetes and use cumin.

Surgery: Cumin might lower blood sugar levels. Some experts worry that it might interfere with blood sugar control during and after surgery. Stop using cumin at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Interactions

Interactions?

Moderate Interaction

Be cautious with this combination

!
  • Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs) interacts with CUMIN

    Cumin might decrease blood sugar. Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar. Taking cumin along with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to go too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your diabetes medication might need to be changed.
    Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), glipizide (Glucotrol), tolbutamide (Orinase), and others.

Dosing

Dosing

The appropriate dose of cumin depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for cumin. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

View References

REFERENCES:

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  • Boxer, M., Roberts, M., and Grammer, L. Cumin anaphylaxis: a case report. J.Allergy Clin.Immunol. 1997;99(5):722-723. View abstract.
  • Clarke, D. B., Barnes, K. A., and Lloyd, A. S. Determination of unusual soya and non-soya phytoestrogen sources in beer, fish products and other foods. Food Addit.Contam 2004;21(10):949-962. View abstract.
  • Derakhshan, S., Sattari, M., and Bigdeli, M. Effect of subinhibitory concentrations of cumin (Cuminum cyminum L.) seed essential oil and alcoholic extract on the morphology, capsule expression and urease activity of Klebsiella pneumoniae. Int.J.Antimicrob.Agents 2008;32(5):432-436. View abstract.
  • Desage, M., Schaal, B., Soubeyrand, J., Orgeur, P., and Brazier, J. L. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric method to characterise the transfer of dietary odorous compounds into plasma and milk. J Chromatogr.B Biomed.Appl. 4-12-1996;678(2):205-210. View abstract.
  • Dhandapani, S., Subramanian, V. R., Rajagopal, S., and Namasivayam, N. Hypolipidemic effect of Cuminum cyminum L. on alloxan-induced diabetic rats. Pharmacol.Res 2002;46(3):251-255. View abstract.
  • Esiyok, D., Otles, S., and Akcicek, E. Herbs as a food source in Turkey. Asian Pac.J Cancer Prev. 2004;5(3):334-339. View abstract.
  • Futrell, J. M. and Rietschel, R. L. Spice allergy evaluated by results of patch tests. Cutis 1993;52(5):288-290. View abstract.
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  • Iacobellis, N. S., Lo, Cantore P., Capasso, F., and Senatore, F. Antibacterial activity of Cuminum cyminum L. and Carum carvi L. essential oils. J Agric.Food Chem 1-12-2005;53(1):57-61. View abstract.
  • Jagtap, A. G. and Patil, P. B. Antihyperglycemic activity and inhibition of advanced glycation end product formation by Cuminum cyminum in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. Food Chem.Toxicol. 5-6-2010; View abstract.
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  • Kamble VA and Patil SD. Spice derived essential oils: effective antifungal and possible therapeutic agents. Journal of Herbs, Spices & Medicinal Plants (J HERBS SPICES MEDICINAL PLANT) 2008;14(3-4):129-143.
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  • Nair, S., Nagar, R., and Gupta, R. Antioxidant phenolics and flavonoids in common Indian foods. J Assoc Physicians India 1998;46(8):708-710. View abstract.
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  • Nostro, A., Cellini, L., Di Bartolomeo, S., Di Campli, E., Grande, R., Cannatelli, M. A., Marzio, L., and Alonzo, V. Antibacterial effect of plant extracts against Helicobacter pylori. Phytother.Res. 2005;19(3):198-202. View abstract.
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  • Electronic Code of Federal Regulations. Title 21. Part 182 -- Substances Generally Recognized As Safe. Available at: https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?CFRPart=182
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CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

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