Overview

Bupleurum is a plant. People use the root for medicine. Bupleurum is included in many Chinese and Japanese traditional herbal formulas.

People use bupleurum for liver infections, respiratory infections, digestion problems, menstrual problems, and many other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these uses.

How does it work ?

Bupleurum might stimulate the cells of the immune system to work harder. It might also have other effects, but none of these are proven in humans.

Uses & Effectiveness ?

Insufficient Evidence for

More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of bupleurum for these uses.

Side Effects

When taken by mouth: Bupleurum is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken in medicinal amounts for up to 5 years. In combination with other herbs, such as in the Japanese herbal formula called Sho-saiko-to, it has caused increased bowel movements, intestinal gas, and drowsiness. It has also been reported to cause serious lung and breathing problems, as well as liver problems.

Special Precautions and Warnings

When taken by mouth: Bupleurum is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken in medicinal amounts for up to 5 years. In combination with other herbs, such as in the Japanese herbal formula called Sho-saiko-to, it has caused increased bowel movements, intestinal gas, and drowsiness. It has also been reported to cause serious lung and breathing problems, as well as liver problems. Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There isn't enough reliable information to know if bupleurum is safe to use when pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

"Auto-immune diseases" such as multiple sclerosis (MS), lupus (systemic lupus erythematosus, SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), or other conditions: Bupleurum might cause the immune system to become more active, and this could increase the symptoms of auto-immune diseases. If you have one of these conditions, it's best to avoid using bupleurum.

Bleeding disorders: Chemicals in bupleurum, called saikosaponins, might slow blood clotting. In theory, taking bupleurum might make bleeding disorders worse.

Diabetes: Chemicals in bupleurum, called saikosaponins, might slow blood clotting. Monitor your blood sugar carefully if you have diabetes and use bupleurum. The dose of your diabetes medication may need to be changed.

Surgery: Chemicals in bupleurum called saikosaponins might prolong bleeding. Stop taking saikosaponins at least two weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Interactions ?

    Moderate Interaction

    Be cautious with this combination

  • Medications that decrease the immune system (Immunosuppressants) interacts with BUPLEURUM

    Bupleurum might increase the immune system. By increasing the immune system, bupleurum might decrease the effectiveness of medications that are used to decrease the immune system.

    Some medications that decrease the immune system include azathioprine (Imuran), basiliximab (Simulect), cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune), daclizumab (Zenapax), muromonab-CD3 (OKT3, Orthoclone OKT3), mycophenolate (CellCept), tacrolimus (FK506, Prograf), sirolimus (Rapamune), prednisone (Deltasone, Orasone), corticosteroids (glucocorticoids), and others.

  • Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs) interacts with BUPLEURUM

    Chemicals in bupleurum, called saikosaponins, might increase blood sugar. Diabetes medications are used to lower blood sugar. Taking bupleurum along with diabetes medications might interfere with blood sugar control. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your diabetes medication might need to be changed.

    Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), glipizide (Glucotrol), tolbutamide (Orinase), and others.

  • Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs) interacts with BUPLEURUM

    Chemicals in bupleurum, called saikosaponins, might slow blood clotting. Taking bupleurum along with medications that also slow blood clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding.

    Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin; clopidogrel (Plavix); nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen (Anaprox, Naprosyn, others); dalteparin (Fragmin); enoxaparin (Lovenox); heparin; warfarin (Coumadin); and others.

Dosing

The appropriate dose of bupleurum depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for bupleurum. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

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CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version.
© Therapeutic Research Faculty 2020.