LOVAGE

OTHER NAME(S):

Ache des Montagnes, Angelica levisticum, Angélique de Montagne, Apio de Monte, Céleri Perpétuel, Herbe à Maggi, Hipposelinum levisticum, Lavose, Levistici Radix, Levístico, Levisticum officinale, Lévistique Officinale, Ligusticum levisticum, Liv&egrave;che, Love Parsley, Maggi Plant, Persil d’Amour, Sea Parsley, Smallage, Smellage, Szechuan Lovage.<br/><br/>

Overview

Overview Information

Lovage is a plant. The root and underground stem (rhizome) are used to make medicine.

Lovage is used as “irrigation therapy” for pain and swelling (inflammation) of the lower urinary tract, for prevention of kidney stones, and to increase the flow of urine when urinary tract infections or fluid retention is present.

Lovage is also used for indigestion, heartburn, stomachbloating, intestinal gas, irregular menstrual periods, sore throat, boils, yellowed skin (jaundice), malaria, fluid around the lung (pleurisy), gout, joint pain (rheumatism), and migraine headaches. It is also used as an expectorant to loosen phlegm in respiratory conditions.

In foods and beverages, lovage is used as a flavor component.

In manufacturing, lovage is used as a fragrance in soaps and cosmetics.

How does it work?

The chemicals in lovage might increase water loss through urination, decrease spasms, and help fight infections.

Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Insufficient Evidence for

  • Indigestion.
  • Heartburn.
  • Intestinal gas.
  • Irregular menstrual periods.
  • Sore throat.
  • Boils.
  • Jaundice.
  • Gout.
  • Migraines.
  • Use as “irrigation therapy” for urinary tract inflammation and kidney stones.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of lovage for these uses.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

Lovage is POSSIBLY SAFE for most people. It might increase sensitivity to the sun, especially with long-term use. This might put you at greater risk for rashes from the sun, sunburns, and skin cancer. Wear sunblock and protective clothing outside, especially if you are light-skinned.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Lovage is LIKELY UNSAFE during pregnancy. There are some reports that it might cause the uterus to contract or start the menstrual period. This could cause a miscarriage.

Not enough is known about the safety of using lovage during breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Fluid retention (edema): Don’t try “irrigation therapy,” which is the use of a mild diuretic such as lovage with lots of fluids to increase urine flow, if you retain fluid because of heart disease or kidney disease.

High blood pressure: There is a concern that lovage might increase the amount of sodium in the body, and that might increase blood pressure.

Kidney problems: Do not use lovage if you have inflamed or painful kidneys or damaged kidney function.

Interactions

Interactions?

Moderate Interaction

Be cautious with this combination

!
  • Water pills (Diuretic drugs) interacts with LOVAGE

    Lovage seems to work like "water pills" by causing the body to lose water. Taking lovage along with other "water pills" might cause the body to lose too much water. Losing too much water can cause you to be dizzy and your blood pressure to go too low.<br /> Some "water pills" include chlorothiazide (Diuril), chlorthalidone (Thalitone), furosemide (Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, Hydrodiuril, Microzide), and others.

Dosing

Dosing

The appropriate dose of lovage depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for lovage. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

View References

REFERENCES:

  • Ashwood-Smith MJ, Ceska O, Yeoman A, et al. Photosensitivity from harvesting lovage (Levisticum officinale). Contact Dermatitis 1992;26(5):356-357. View abstract.
  • Bylaite E, Roozen JP, Legger A, et al. Dynamic deadspace-gas chromatography-olfactometry analysis of different anatomical parts of lovage (Levisticum officinale Koch.) at eight growing stages. J Agric Food Chem 2000;48(12):6183-6190. View abstract.
  • Podebrad, F., Heil, M., Reichert, S., Mosandl, A., Sewell, A. C., and Bohles, H. 4,5-dimethyl-3-hydroxy-2[5H]-furanone (sotolone)--the odour of maple syrup urine disease. J Inherit.Metab Dis. 1999;22(2):107-114. View abstract.
  • Simon JE, Chadwick.A.F., Craker E. Herbs: An Indexed Bibliography. 1971-1980. The Scientific Literature on Selected Herbs, and Aromatic and Medicinal Plants of the Temperate Zone. 1984.
  • Electronic Code of Federal Regulations. Title 21. Part 182 -- Substances Generally Recognized As Safe. Available at: https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?CFRPart=182
  • Heck AM, DeWitt BA, Lukes AL. Potential interactions between alternative therapies and warfarin. Am J Health Syst Pharm 2000;57:1221-7. View abstract.
  • Robbers JE, Tyler VE. Tyler's Herbs of Choice: The Therapeutic Use of Phytomedicinals. New York, NY: The Haworth Herbal Press, 1999.

More Resources for LOVAGE

CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version. © Therapeutic Research Faculty 2009.