BUTTERNUT

OTHER NAME(S):

Butternussbaum, Douberre, Juglans cinerea, Lemon Walnut, Nogal Blanco Americano, Nogal Ceniciento, Noyer à Beurre, Noyer de Beurre, Noyer Blanc, Noyer Cendré, Oil Nut, White Walnut.<br/><br/>

Overview

Overview Information

Butternut is a plant. People use the bark for medicine.

People take butternut for constipation, gallbladder disorders, hemorrhoids, and skin diseases. It is also used for cancer and infections caused by bacteria and parasites. Some people use butternut as “a tonic.”

How does it work?

Butternut bark might work as a laxative to help stool move through the intestine.

Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Insufficient Evidence for

More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of butternut for these uses.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

Butternut appears to be safe for most people, but it can cause diarrhea and irritation of the stomach and intestines.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: It’s UNSAFE to use butternut in large amounts if you are pregnant. It might stimulate the bowels too much. Avoid use.

Interactions

Interactions?

Moderate Interaction

Be cautious with this combination

!
  • Digoxin (Lanoxin) interacts with BUTTERNUT

    Butternut is a type of laxative called a stimulant laxative. Stimulant laxatives can decrease potassium levels in the body. Low potassium levels can increase the risk of side effects of digoxin (Lanoxin).

  • Medications for inflammation (Corticosteroids) interacts with BUTTERNUT

    Some medications for inflammation can decrease potassium in the body. Butternut is a type of laxative that might also decrease potassium in the body. Taking butternut along with some medications for inflammation might decrease potassium in the body too much.<br/><br/> Some medications for inflammation include dexamethasone (Decadron), hydrocortisone (Cortef), methylprednisolone (Medrol), prednisone (Deltasone), and others.

  • Medications taken by mouth (Oral drugs) interacts with BUTTERNUT

    Butternut is a laxative. Laxatives can decrease how much medicine your body absorbs. Decreasing how much medicine your body absorbs can decrease the effectiveness of your medication.

  • Stimulant laxatives interacts with BUTTERNUT

    Butternut is a type of laxative called a stimulant laxative. Stimulant laxatives speed up the bowels. Taking butternut along with other stimulant laxatives could speed up the bowels too much and cause dehydration and low minerals in the body.<br/><nb>Some stimulant laxatives include bisacodyl (Correctol, Dulcolax), cascara, castor oil (Purge), senna (Senokot), and others.

  • Warfarin (Coumadin) interacts with BUTTERNUT

    Butternut can work as a laxative. In some people butternut can cause diarrhea. Diarrhea can increase the effects of warfarin and increase the risk of bleeding. If you take warfarin do not take excessive amounts of butternut.

  • Water pills (Diuretic drugs) interacts with BUTTERNUT

    Butternut is a laxative. Some laxatives can decrease potassium in the body. "Water pills" can also decrease potassium in the body. Taking butternut along with "water pills" might decrease potassium in the body too much.<br/><nb>Some "water pills" that can decrease potassium include chlorothiazide (Diuril), chlorthalidone (Thalitone), furosemide (Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, HydroDiuril, Microzide), and others.

Dosing

Dosing

The appropriate dose of butternut depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for butternut. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

View References

REFERENCES:

  • Blumenthal M, ed. The Complete German Commission E Monographs: Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines. Trans. S. Klein. Boston, MA: American Botanical Council, 1998.
  • Brinker F. Herb Contraindications and Drug Interactions. 2nd ed. Sandy, OR: Eclectic Medical Publications, 1998.
  • Gruenwald J, Brendler T, Jaenicke C. PDR for Herbal Medicines. 1st ed. Montvale, NJ: Medical Economics Company, Inc., 1998.
  • McGuffin M, Hobbs C, Upton R, Goldberg A, eds. American Herbal Products Association's Botanical Safety Handbook. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, LLC 1997.

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CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version.
© Therapeutic Research Faculty 2018.